• Designing for the planet and its people

    Idean UK

    £5.00

    This month we are focusing on designing for our planet and its people. We'll cover topics from financial inclusion, prototyping future energy policies to tackling the climate crisis as a community. We'll discuss what we're currently doing, good practices in designing for the planet & what's our role as service designers in dealing with #ClimateCrisis. We bring you fabulous talks from Ofgem, Idean and Snook! Ofgem Last year Ofgem received grant funding from the Regulators’ Pioneer Fund to try something new in regulation. At the same time, Ofgem teamed up with the Department of Business and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) to run a 'Future Energy Retail Market Review'. They explored 2 burning questions: 1. As the energy market evolves, we need to ensure that people are appropriately protected. How can we involve consumers in this design process? 2. Can methods that are typically used to design new products and services bring value to a regulatory policy-making project? How do they need to be adapted? The team will share their approach to inclusive design and research in this regulatory policy design project. -------- Idean It is estimated that in total 25.6 million people (half of UK adults) display one or more characteristics of being potentially vulnerable (Financial Lives Survey 2017). All these people could be better supported and protected by more inclusive services that provide further guidance and access to relevant products. An inclusively designed financial service is one that enables everyone to use and enjoy the experience, no matter what their situation or background. Financial inclusivity enables people to better understand and manage money. Katie will share how we can enable financial organisations to better support vulnerable customers through inclusive design. She’ll also be sharing some resources and tools that we are working on to support organisations to design inclusively. Bio Katie Wyburd is Strategy & Growth Director at idean. Katie has a keen passion for inclusive design and has been working to support various financial organisations to be further inclusive. Katie has also helped to drive the creation of inclusive design resources for organisations to use to help create inclusive impact. -------- Snook Our current system is broken, both environmentally & socially. We need a collective rethink about what it means to be a human living on Earth, and how we treat our planet and each other. It is our collective responsibility as citizens and designers to do our part to spark urgency and influence conversations, commissioning, design, and delivery towards addressing the climate crisis head on, through the development of our practice. Together, Lucy & Becky will talk about the growing #designandclimate community that works to figure out how we as designers can adapt our existing tools and processes to make them more sustainable. Do they need to be replaced with new ways of working altogether? What might this look like and how can we prototype them? This is a rallying call to join the movement. The planet can't wait. Bio Lucy is a service designer at Snook where she works to make the world more human by designing sustainable services that value people & planet. Together with her colleagues Ness, Zoë and Izzy, Lucy founded the #designandclimate community that aims to incorporate the environment at every stage of everything that is 'designed’ and collectively shift our design practice to one that is more conscious and inherently sustainable. Becky is Policy Lab's service & communications designer. Studying at the Royal College of Art in 2017 she co-founded SustainLab RCA to provide a cross-disciplinary space to encourage critical and ethical thinking about the role of artists and designers into the 21st Century. This theme has always guided her work, which she is now seeking to thread into her role in government and the design community. See you all soon! Peace & love from the service lab team!

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  • Designing for Policy

    Idean UK

    £5.00

    Aloha! This month we're very excited to bring you three fantastic talks focussed on designing for policy. Join us at this event to explore how service design can support policymaking, how to make policy further people-centred and the role of evidence in the policy design process. Arguing against yourself: my experiences in policy design and digital delivery of government services Department of Work and Pensions - Jacob Browning --- How service design is helping policy teams to design for people in crisis? Ministry of Justice - Lauren Abraham @laurenjma, Carolina Pizatto @carolpizatto, Mia Kos @miakos Policy is often described as something that is thrown over the wall to delivery teams. To change this paradigm, teams in the public sector are developing new ways of working. For the past two years at the Ministry of Justice, we have been embedding user-centred design in policymaking. Our session will showcase work that the User Centred Policy Design team (UCPD) has been developing. We will also share what approaches we are using to tackle complex policy spaces and where service design fits within this context. --- Design in policy - lessons from five years of experiments Policy Lab UK - Vasant Chari @VasChari Vasant will reflect on some lessons Policy Lab have learnt from five years of experimenting in policy. He will share examples of design approaches to projects spanning policy on Private Rented Sector, Maritime Autonomy, youth engagement and job seekers. Is there a role for design in the way we develop policy and advise ministers? How can we make policy more open and more people centred? ------------ Speakers bio Jacob Browning Over his five years at the Department for work and pensions, Jacob Browning has been providing evidence and insight to support policy design, service design and the digital transformation of the Department's services. --- Lauren Abraham Lauren Abraham is a Senior Service Designer working to bring user-centred design practices to the UK justice system covering areas such as Youth Justice, Victims Policy, and Probation Services. Carolina Pizatto Carolina is a service designer at the Ministry of Justice, currently encouraging policy teams to embed user-centred design into their processes. She has previous experience at the Cabinet Office’s Policy Lab experimenting with new ways of working in the UK Government, and has also worked with Design Thinking and Design Research for the private sector. Mia Kos Mia is an independent service designer working with the User-centred Policy Design Team at the Ministry of Justice. Currently, she’s working in the prisoners’ rehabilitation space. Throughout her career Mia’s focus has been on helping organisations understand people who use their products or services and design solutions that match their needs. --- Vasant Chari Vasant Chari leads the Policy Lab team at the UK government's Cabinet Office. The Policy Lab work across UK government departments to develop and demonstrate new approaches to policy design. Vasant isn't a designer, his background is in Home Office policy - as well as taking a sabbatical to work with youth development charities in India and Tanzania. His role in Policy Lab is about creating permission, space and opportunities for people to try new methods. This has included leading on over 20 projects, hiring the UK government's first 'policy designer' and working with hundreds of civil servants. ------------ The evening is being hosted by the great folk over at Idean UK. They build products, services and Beta Businesses – that launch and grow faster, and behave bolder. Creating a new environment to behave differently lets them and their clients tackle new opportunities with a fresh start, and learn along the way. They're hiring! Check out their open roles here: https://www.idean.com/careers?offices=26238&departments=all Hope to see you there! Love & Peace The Service Lab Team Afsa, Charley, Jenni & Rupert

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  • Service Design & Ethics

    The Guardian

    £5.00

    Aloha! One of the key challenges that we, as service designers, face today is managing user needs and stakeholders' requirements which may be at odds with each other. This has an implication on how we design services, as every design decision we make has a significant impact on the quality of people's lives. With this in mind, how do we ensure that we design services ethically? What does it mean to design ethically? We've got two great talks lined up for you to explore the relationship between design and ethics: 1. ISSA TRAP: the future isn’t just a connected fridge Alex Fefegha and Akil Benjamin @fxfegha @akilbenjamin @Comuzi_lab Technology is shaping our society and culture - but what kind of future do we want to build? The driving force of the future isn’t about connected fridges or fancy home technologies, but the seemingly invisible technologies powering the things you don’t see. New but invisible technologies like automated decisions and machine learning are influencing industries like banking, advertising, healthcare and security. Understanding the impact of these technologies will be crucial to helping people navigate society in the future. Chatbots are being called THE next interface for communicating with young people. But there are still big questions around who owns the data shared with a chatbot and how chatbots handle privacy. So Projects by IF and Comuzi worked together to answer the question: how can we expose the seams of a mental health chatbot to make its actions explainable? 2. Design for Humanity, not humans Hollie Lubbock, @hollielubbock Humanity is feeling the effects of huge changes due to design and technology but often is left out of the considerations when we create that world. What does it mean to design ethically, and how can we do it? Hollie will explore how and why we should switch from a focus on individuals to focus on humanity. Hollie is a freelance experience design director, she focuses on helping clients create products and services that excite audiences and drive engagement. Over the last ten years, she has worked in the luxury, culture, publishing & tech sectors, collaborating closely with clients to create user-centered designs for a wide range of digital products, from large-scale collections systems to small innovative app projects. Her passion projects are around trends, ethics and how technology affects society. We can't wait to see you all there! :D Love and peace The Service Lab Team Afsa, Charley, Jenni and Rupert

  • Designing for Impact

    Idean UK

    £5.00

    Aloha! We're back! We're super excited to bring you two great talks for this event. Join us at this event to explore measuring impact from the beginning and key considerations to keep in mind when designing with a focus on outcome. 1. Designing for impact Ursule Kajokaite, Beez Fedia - Super Being Labs Every product or service we release into the world aims to deliver certain impact. While many companies measure this impact once the product is launched, we can think about impact as something that should be built into the product from the very start rather than come as an afterthought. In this talk, we will be discussing how embedding the framework for measuring impact from the start of the design process can help us deliver better products and services, and how we can do that. Coming from an interdisciplinary background, Ursule Kajokaite is a Product Consultant at a social innovation agency Super Being Labs, where she helps charities and other great people to design and build products and services that help accelerate social change. Beez Fedia is the founder of Lyra where he is reimagining the employee experience by empowering organisations to take a data-driven approach to designing inclusive cultures that increase employee performance, retention, wellbeing and loyalty. Previously, he was Product & Design Director at Super Being Labs. 2. Deliverables die in drawers Charlie Cosham, Charley Pothecary - Idean UK Charlie Cosham and Charley Pothecary from Idean will be talking about how to deliver impact by shifting focus from outputs to outcomes. There’s an ever-growing risk of Service Design being seen as a theoretical exercise rather than a practical methodology for delivery. Whilst blueprints, personas and journeys can appear to be the result of our work, they’re just tools to help us achieve an outcome. But how much of our day do we focus on a deliverable, rather than an outcome? We believe that deliverables die in drawers; outcomes are the stories that live on. Charlie Cosham is an engagement lead at Idean with a specialism in facilitation and a passion for using research and insight as to the basis for every design decision. Previously she has worked with the C-suite of 40+ companies to design solutions for their mission-critical challenges. Her approach will always be to weigh equally the business, user and employee needs in her design - believing a sustainable solution balances all three. Charley Pothercary is a Senior Service Designer at Idean with a passion for creating and improving services that can enhance lives. She has expertise in user research and inclusive design. She has experience in building services from scratch, improving existing services and creating a user-focused mindset across public, private and third sector organisations. The evening is being hosted by the great folk over at Idean UK. Idean was formerly Adaptive Lab, and are now part of the Idean global design studio network. They build products, services and Beta Businesses – that launch and grow faster, and behave bolder. Creating a new environment to behave differently lets them and their clients tackle new opportunities with a fresh start, and learn along the way. Their team is a hybrid bunch of early-stage proposition designers and go-to-market builders. And they're hiring! Check out their open roles here: https://www.idean.com/careers?offices=26238&departments=all Hope to see you there! Love & Peace The Service Lab Team Afsa, Charley, Jenni & Rupert

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  • Designing for cognitive diversity

    The Guardian

    £5.00

    Hi there This month we're focusing on cognitive diversity and how to design services that work for everyone. Cognitive diversity is a fascinating field that covers everything from learning disabilities to short-term cognitive impairments like being drunk or being a sleep deprived parent. Understanding the cognitive needs of your audience is a prerequisite to designing services that actually work! This month there will be three talks: How to design for cognitive diversity Christine Hemphill from Open Inclusion will be providing a broad introduction to the subject to help us understand what cognitive diversity means and what types of approaches work best. Inclusive content in service design and delivery Jenni Parker and Ali Fawkes from Humanly will talk about how to create truly inclusive content that can be used in the design process. They will provide practical information on how to create workshops, research stimulus and more for a wide range of stakeholders. Designing for Aphasia: Eva Park Steph Wilson is a Professor in Human-Computer Interaction at City University London. She'll be talking specifically about designing for people with aphasia. We look forward to seeing you there. Love and peace The Service Lab Team Afsa, Charley, Jenni and Rupert -------------------------------- More details How to Design for Cognitive Diversity, Christine Hemphill Christine is co-founder and Managing Director of Open Inclusion. She ensures that the client’s business objectives are understood, managed and fully met through great collaboration, clear focus, prioritisation and an uncompromising eye for quality and practical usability of work produced. Christine has a background of over 20 years in designing and making products, services, teams or businesses, or making them better. The last 5 years have been solely focussed on customer and workplace inclusion, digital design and inclusive brand experiences. --------------------------------------- Inclusive content in service design and delivery, Jenni Parker + Ali Fawkes During the service design process we need to convey complex information to participants of research and co-creation activities, such as the problem we're trying to solve; our process for tackling it; and the insights we've gained from research. The need to create inclusive content continues as we go on to build our solutions for implementation. Humanly has a wide range of experience of creating accessible information in a variety of circumstances. We have created materials, tools and content for people with dementia, neurodiverse people and people with learning disabilities. We will share practical techniques for creating engaging and inclusive communications on a tight budget and timescale. This will include methods for producing materials without any specialist equipment - for example, creating plain English video information using mobile phones or illustrated cards. @jenniparker57 @ali_fawkes --------------------------------------- Design for Aphasia, Steph Wilson Steph researches and teaches the design of usable and accessible interactive technologies and experiences. She is Professor of Human-Computer Interaction at City, University of London where she is also Co-Director of the Centre for HCI Design. Steph's recent research has been concerned with innovative UX design for people with aphasia, a language impairment that affects one third of people who survive a stroke. This has included GeST, a computer-based gesture therapy tool, and the award-winning virtual world of EVA Park. She has published widely in this area. Along with colleagues, she is developing and promoting UX design guidelines for aphasia known as "Language-Light UX". @stephwilsoncity @EVAphasia

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  • Service Design and Voice Interfaces

    Adaptive Lab

    £5.00

    Hello there! This month we're talking about voice interfaces. Voice assistant technology is rapidly improving, and voice interfaces are transforming the way that users access and interact with services. This technology poses exciting opportunities for service design, however designing for voice interactions comes with challenges as well as possibilities. Moreover, the development of services delivered via voice interfaces is mainly tech-driven at present rather than the result of human-centred design. Join us at this event to explore key considerations when designing for interactions with voice technology, and the role of service designers in designing for voice interactions today and in the future. There will be two talks. 1. "This is not what we wanted": Talking with and around voice agents Stuart Reeves Design is increasingly said to be about constructing 'conversations' with end users. Advances in speech technologies and the spread of speech-enabled agents are pushing this idea literally. Devices like the Amazon Echo, Google Home and Siri connect users with services and are providing platforms for designers to interact with users in new ways. In spite of this (often hyped) anticipation of an AI-powered future, it is not always clear how the vision measures up to lived reality of 'having a conversation' with machines. Designing for voice-driven interactions also means understanding how they sit within social environments saturated with everyday conversation. Stuart will present work being done at University of Nottingham that examines exactly how voice interfaces like the Amazon Echo come to be used in the home to fulfil a variety of activities: managing shopping lists, listening to music, playing games or asking for information. By capturing 'naturalistic' recordings of Echo use in participants' homes we can start to build a very rich picture of how users 'get stuff done' with voice interfaces. The aim of the talk is to present a range of practical implications as well as conceptual challenges for designers and user researchers tackling voice interfaces. 2 Physiology and Psychology of the Human Voice Professor Carolyn McGettigan On the physiology of the human voice, the information we can get from it, and how we study it as cognitive scientists. Carolyn is a Professor of Speech and Hearing Sciences at UCL. Her research focuses on the neural and behavioural aspects of human vocal communication, including speech perception and perceptual learning (and individual differences in these processes), audiovisual speech, voice identity processing, perception and production of emotional vocalizations, and social cues in spoken communication. The evening is being hosted by the great folk over at Idean UK. Idean was formerly Adaptive Lab, and are now part of the Idean global design studio network. They build products, services and Beta Businesses – that launch and grow faster, and behave bolder. Creating a new environment to behave differently lets them and their clients tackle new opportunities with a fresh start, and learn along the way. Their team is a hybrid bunch of early-stage proposition designers and go-to-market builders. And they're hiring! Check out their open roles here: https://www.idean.com/careers?offices=26238&departments=all Hope to see you there! Love & Peace The Service Lab Team Afsa, Jenni & Rupert

  • Designing services for the Deaf

    Adaptive Lab

    £5.00

    Hello Service Lab This month we're focusing on designing for deaf people. Roughly 9 million people in the UK have a hearing loss. This is 1 in every 7 people. With the number of people with hearing loss rising, how might we design our services to be inclusive for deaf people? 1. Designed by and with Ness and Pete from Snook @wearesnook Ness and Pete are service designers working at Snook’s Glasgow studio. They are keen to share learnings about services designed by and with BSL Users, and excited to join this meetup from 400 miles away. Ness specialises in user-centred design and research, and has worked to involve people in the design of cities, transport, energy, healthcare, finance and telecoms services. Ness is studying for an MSc in Sustainability and Adaptation, with the aim of creating more sustainable services and using design to rapidly experiment with ways of adapting to climate change. Having worked as everything from a user researcher to a videographer, commercial carpenter, and even a windsurfing instructor; Peter is a designer with a wide set of skills. He enjoys thinking about the big picture and what the future can hold. He believes that design can help change the way we view the world and can have a positive impact on how we tackle big, complex challenges. 2. Engaging with Deaf people to develop communication methods Edward Richards from Cutting Edge Design @edwardCED Edward is Director of Cutting Edge Design and Founder and Director of bookONE. Originally, he worked as an IT software programmer before moving to design. He has a passion for inclusion, and loves looking at issues and thinking about how to resolve them through design and technology. As a native Deaf British Sign Language (BSL) user Edward can view a potential barrier from a deaf perspective and suggest solutions. Edward is a strong advocate for equality and sits on various forums, committees and access advisory panels within the Health, Council, Museums and Galleries sectors. He has also sat on a major NHS procurement panel with his expertise as a deaf service user. He enjoys sports and ten years ago, returned to playing his favourite sport, hockey and became a qualified Level 1 Umpire earlier in 2016. After a stint as the Captain of Wapping Hockey Club MX (known as the X-Men) team, he is now the Umpire Liaison Officer dealing with over 100 umpires! He regularly puts himself forward to challenge his own abilities which has allowed him to do things he never thought he would, including being part of the London Paralympics Opening Ceremony aerial team in 2012. He regularly gives talks using BSL in museums and galleries across London. *Please note we will have a BSL interpreter for this event.* We'll be hosted by the lovely people from Adaptive Lab who have had some exciting news recently! They're joining forces with Idean, a global design studio. Together, they set out to design a bolder future. Read more about it here: https://www.adaptivelab.com/thoughts/business/going-global-joining-idean/ Looking forward to see you all there! ❤️✌️ The Service Lab Team Afsa, Jenni + Rupert

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  • What makes a good service and why are we so afraid to talk about it?

    Aloha! We talk about "What is Service Design" a lot but what does good service design look like? We're excited to have Lou Downe with us this month to explore "What makes a good service and why are we so afraid to talk about it?" With almost 80% of the UK GDP generated from services, and an industry that’s between 15-20 years old (depending on who you ask) it’s becoming increasingly hard to justify why service design has no discernible standards for what we mean by a ‘good service’. Ask a graphic designer to tell you what makes ‘good’ graphic design and you will get a different answer each time, but they’ll give you an answer. Ask most service designers this question though, and they’re likely to say something like ‘it depends on the service’ or ‘it’s hard to generalise’. Lou Downe [@LouiseDowne] is on a personal mission to get the industry to discuss (and maybe even agree on!) some standards for what we mean collectively by ‘good services’. Lou is Director of Design and Service Standards for the UK Government at the Government Digital Service (GDS). They joined the UK Government in 2014 and founded the discipline of service design in government. 4 years later they now lead a community of over 3,000 designers, user researchers and content designers across government - and the direction of a £5m programme of design standards, products, and activities focussed on enabling government to transform services to meet user needs. They are a passionate believer in the responsibility of design to create a world which benefits everyone, and are a prominent protagonist for transparency and ethics in the design industry. Book your tickets quick! See you soon! Love + Peace The Service Lab Team

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  • Can hardware enable better services?

    Aviva Digital Garage

    £5.00

    Hola amigos From video doorbells to Alexa, hardware is taking over. But for many of us hardware design feels like an alien concept and something that we've never designed for. That's why we're delighted to have Mat Hunter from the MD of Central Research Laboratory come and talk to us. He'll be asking the question: Can hardware enable better services? It's undeniable that software remains a driver of great change in the world, leading to a revolution in digitally-enabled services. But we humans still live in the real world and this means that, for us to create effective services, we must consider physical touch-points. Hardware is still dominated by the multinationals with their multi-million pound budgets (Apple, Amazon, Google, Samsung) but we are seeing a rise in boot-strapped startups - even in London! This talk will help you understand what's going on in the world of hardware and how you might use it to create better services. Mat is awesome. He runs an accelerator and co-working space for hardware startups. He is also visiting tutor at the RCA for Service Design. Prior to that, Mat studied Industrial Design and Interaction Design, spent 15 years with IDEO and was Chief Design Officer at the Design Council. See you there Love + Peace The Service Lab Team

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  • Brand x Service Design with Wolff Olins

    Wolff Olins

    £5.00

    Hello This month we're diving into the fascinating territory of service design and brand! And who better than to lead us in the conversation than the global brand company Wollf Olins? We'll be posing three important questions: - What is brand? - Why is it relevant to service designers? - How do you incorporate it into your design practise? Wolff Olins will share thoughts and spark discussion around this emerging aspect of brand in service design. Part 1 What is brand? Claire Berthet As Strategy director at Wolff Olins, Claire helps organisations define and realise their strategy for growth. She's worked across property and urban development, media and telecoms, product design, and finance. This has included helping Orange change the way they engage customers and present their products, across 32 different markets. She loves unlocking thorny business challenges with an approach founded on rigorous analysis, guided by an understanding of human behaviour, and motivated by a belief that the right answer will be right for people, right for business, and right for society. She brings experience working on projects around the globe, both client side and agency. Part 2 Why is it relevant to service designers? Colin Greenwood Colin has more than 17 years’ experience in assessing and optimising customer experience. He leads cross-functional teams, equips them with the frameworks and processes to create meaningful and lasting experiences. He specialises in tech and retail with recent collaborations including: Dixons Carphone (new service creation), EE (employee experience programme to improve CX) and Canon (CX excellence).Before his time with Wolff Olins, Colin was Head of UX for the digital agency POSSIBLE and spent an enlightening few years working for aid agencies in the UK, Honduras, Kenya and Sudan. He also holds a Master’s degree in social anthropology. Part 3 How you can incorporate it into your design practice? Kartik Poria As a Senior Experience Strategist, Kartik helps organisations to conceptualise, plan and deliver memorable experiences for customers and employees. He's especially interested in the impact brand experiences have on the way people think and feel about organisations, and how this impacts people's behaviour. Kartik recently helped a disruptive global tech company to understand services in different markets. Kartik's also experienced in the cultural sector, having worked with the British Museum to imagine the future of exhibitions, and facilitated Historic Royal Palaces as it thinks about the lasting impression it wants to leave visitors with. It promises to be a fascinating evening on a great topic. Love and Peace The Service Lab Team

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