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Olive Oil Class & Potluck

Have you ever tasted freshly pressed olive oil? Do you know the difference between a Tuscan and a Ligurian style oil? Can you detect rancidity simply by smelling an oil? Would you like to better understand what extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) signifies?

All these questions and more will be answered during our Olive Oil 101 class to take place at the Fort Point Arts Community on June 24th from 4-5:30pm.

Instructor Lina Smith who trained to become a professional olive oil taster in Italy, will begin with a 10-15min lecture on olive oil (history, production, what EVOO means), followed by a lesson on how to taste it. We will work our way through a guided tasting of 8 oils selected from different olive varieties, regions and producers, two of them featuring defects so commonly found in supermarket oils that most people are completely oblivious to them. Lina will also bring a surprise oil in a category all its own!

You will come away with a renewed perspective on olive oil, better aware of the styles and varieties that you prefer and armed with the necessary knowledge to stay away from stale oils.

We encourage participants who would like to stay for a bit after the class to bring favorite dishes, recipes and tricks that feature olive oil to share (of course, non-olive oil dishes are welcome too!).

Please note, the gallery space and store do not have a kitchen or running water, so please bring easy-to-clean up dishes that don't don't require refrigeration or to be heated up. Also, don't forget serving utensils.

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  • TomM

    Hello Lina - I would love to take part in your activities, and count on being in Boston before the end of the year. I'll give plenty of warning, and do hope to meet you and your group soon. Meantime have a look at my plan to start a grass-roots movement for olive oil quality (http://www.truthinoliveoil.com/2012/07/olive-oil-activism) which shares much with the Slow Food philosophy.
    All best,
    Tom

    July 28, 2012

  • TomM

    Sorry I missed this event - so great to see educational events taking place around olive oil! This is just the kind of grassroots quality revolulution that I hope my book (Extra Virginity) and website (www.truthinoliveoil.com) will help to encourage. Kudos to Slow Food Boston for pushing this agenda. All best, Tom Mueller

    June 30, 2012

  • Ben G.

    great presentation and really interesting information. It was exactly what I was looking for: learn some interesting facts about oil and taste a bunch of really good ones. GREAT!

    June 25, 2012

  • orna f.

    Good

    June 25, 2012

  • Slow Food B.

    Thank you all for your comments. Ben, just so you are aware one of the missions of Slow Food is to preserve and also learn about culinary traditions. The term "Slow" also refers to slowing down, enjoying your food and those with whom you are sharing a meal. On behalf of the Slow Food Boston events committee, I know all of us like to share our knowledge of foods we learn about so were really happy to be able to offer this olive oil class. Look forward to seeing any of you who plan on attending!

    June 24, 2012

  • orna f.

    i agree with you both: OO in New England isnt exactly slow, but what would life be like without EVOO?

    June 23, 2012

  • A former member
    A former member

    Hi Benjamin - I am new to this convivium so only speak on behalf of myself. Your points are valid. However, I don't see the harm in furthering our knowledge of a product that, I assume, most of us use on a fairly regular basis. In my view, I think these types of events are fine as long as we are also holding events to support local farmers and producers.

    June 23, 2012

  • Benjamin Raphael S.

    Slow food: might you consider having classes, workshops or gatherings on food we can actually concieve of producing in this bioregion? When was the last time someone from new England harvested olives without taking a 4000 dollar plane ride first? What happened to local? Where is the slow in this event?

    June 23, 2012

26 went

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