• Cicero and Stoicism: the Stoic "paradoxes"

    New York Society for Ethical Culture

    Cicero was a great Roman orator, lawyer, and philosopher. While not a Stoic, he wrote quite a bit about Stoicism, usually sympathetically. In this case, we'll look at his "Stoic Paradoxes," a booklet that goes through six Stoic notions that defy common sense. You can find the full text of Paradoxa Stoicorum, free, here: https://archive.org/details/StoicParadoxesParadoxaStoicorumMarcusTulliusCicero You can also get a commentary on the text (and on several other Stoic-related writings by Cicero) for $0.99 here: https://www.amazon.com/Cicero-Stoicism-Introductions-Paradoxes-Disputations-ebook/dp/B07V5JVS1K/ Admission: $5 suggested donation, free for members of the Society for Ethical Culture. Learn more about our host organization, the New York Society for Ethical Culture, at http://www.ethical.nyc

  • Stoicism and Emotion I

    Atrium of 60 Wall Street

    [Cross-posted from NYC Stoics: https://www.meetup.com/New-York-City-Stoics/events/263736390/] In modern parlance, being a "stoic" means sucking it up, keeping a stiff upper lip, and suppressing your emotions. That's a far cry from how the ancient Stoics understood both Stoic practice and emotions themselves. But how did the ancient Stoics understand emotions? How does a practicing Stoic work with them? And what are emotions according to the Stoics, anyway? We'll be exploring these questions and more by working through Margaret Graver's excellent book "Stoicism and Emotion" to cap off this year's theme of reading through modern sources. To prepare for the meetup, please read from the Introduction through Chapter 3 (Vigor and Responsibility) and mark any concepts that you'd like to bring up for discussion. Massimo Pigliucci has summaries of each chapter we're covering, which you can find at the following links: https://howtobeastoic.wordpress.com/2018/01/02/stoicism-and-emotions-i-a-science-of-the-mind/ https://howtobeastoic.wordpress.com/2018/01/10/stoicism-and-emotion-ii-the-pathetic-syllogism/ https://howtobeastoic.wordpress.com/2018/01/26/stoicism-and-emotion-iii-vigor-and-responsibility/

  • Arête: on the nature of human excellence

    New York Society for Ethical Culture

    The point of Stoic training is to become more virtuous. But what does "virtue" mean? Definitely not what Christians refer to by that term. We'll discuss not just the canonical four virtues of practical wisdom, courage, justice, and temperance, but more broadly what it means to strive to be an excellent (i.e., virtuous) human being. Suggested reading: https://www.patreon.com/posts/arete-on-nature-27612323 Admission: $5 suggested donation, free for members of the Society for Ethical Culture. Learn more about our host organization, the New York Society for Ethical Culture, at http://www.ethical.nyc

  • Paris Stoic School

    La Villa des Créateurs

    $120.00

    Spend two days in Paris studying ancient and modern Stoicism! Join Massimo and a small group of proficientes (students of Stoicism) to dig into Epictetus’ famous manual for a happy life, learn about practical Stoicism and how to apply it to your life. While there, seek out Roman antiquities at the Louvre and enjoy French cuisine and wines (don't worry, we won't accuse you of being an Epicurean...)! Registration (at this site, required to reserve your spot): $120, covers only expenses for organizing the event. Refundable until 30 days before event, or if event is cancelled. Textbooks: Enchiridion, translation by W.A. Oldfather, in: Delphi Complete Works of Epictetus (https://www.amazon.com/Complete-Epictetus-Illustrated-Ancient-Classics-ebook/dp/B07B81HYWL/) A Handbook for New Stoics: How to Thrive in a World Out of Your Control, by Massimo Pigliucci & Gregory Lopez (https://www.amazon.com/Handbook-New-Stoics-Week-Week/dp/1615195335/) Program: Friday, 3 January 9am - 1pm: introduction to Stoicism and Epictetus, reading and discussion of sections of the Enchiridion 1pm - 3pm: lunch break, small independent groups 3pm - 7pm: reading and discussion of sections of the Enchiridion, practical exercises concerning the discipline of desire and aversion 8pm: group dinner at a nearby venue Saturday, 4 January 9am - 1pm: reading and discussion of sections of the Enchiridion, practical exercises concerning the discipline of action 1pm - 3pm: lunch break, small independent groups 3pm - 7pm: reading and discussion of sections of the Enchiridion, practical exercises concerning the discipline of assent