• The Art of Living: Part II

    Atrium of 60 Wall Street

    (Cross-posted from NYC Stoics: https://www.meetup.com/New-York-City-Stoics/events/261002514/) Philosophy ain't what it used to be. Nowadays, it is practiced in universities as something somewhat akin to science -- its function is conceived as something that is supposed to describe aspects of the world in some sense through philosophical theories. But ancient philosophy's goal was different; it was said to be more of an art of living. But how could philosophy affect one's way of life, exactly? This is the question that John Sellars explores in his book "The Art of Living", which examines the Socratic and Stoic conceptions of philosophy as a way of life. The NYC Stoics will continue their year of modern sources at this meetup by tackling the second half of Sellars' book, which examines the relationship between theory/reasoning/words (logos) and practice/training (askesis). To prepare, please read from the introduction through all of Part II (Logos and askesis, Chapters 5-7) and the conclusion. While reading, please note at least one concept per chapter you'd like to discuss with the group, either because you find it interesting, want clarification on it, or disagree with it.

  • Can Stoics be billionaires?

    New York Society for Ethical Culture

    Seneca was, by modern standards, a billionaire. And yet, he claimed that great wealth gets in the way of practicing virtue. Some people say that modern billionaires like Jeff Bezos of Amazon use "Stoic techniques" to increase their wealth. But does that make them Stoic? What, exactly, is the relationship between wealth and Stoicism? Suggested reading: https://www.patreon.com/posts/nope-jeff-bezos-24707722 Admission: $5 suggested donation, free for members of the Society for Ethical Culture. Learn more about our host organization, the New York Society for Ethical Culture, at http://www.ethical.nyc

  • RNY Summer Solstice Party

    Ellington in the Park

    Celebrate our hemisphere's longest and sunniest day with friends and fellow Reasonable New Yorkers at Ellington In The Park in lovely Riverside Park. Enjoy delicious food and thirst quenching drinks from Ellington’s grill menu and full bar. Play on the traveling rings and other park amenities, and have fun in the sun! Ellington in the Park is in Riverside Park around 105th street. The closest park entrance is at Riverside Drive and 103rd Street.

  • Rome Stoic School on Cicero and the Stoics

    Hotel Mediterraneo

    $150.00

    [The handbook for this edition of the Rome Stoic School can be donwloaded here: https://tinyurl.com/yaydft3q] Spend three days in Rome studying ancient and modern Stoicism! Join Massimo and a small group of proficientes (students of Stoicism) to dig into Cicero's writings about the Stoics, learn about practical Stoicism and how to apply it to your life. While there, walk through the Roman Fori or visit the National Roman Museum, and of course enjoy traditional Roman cuisine and local wines (don't worry, we won't accuse you of being an Epicurean...)! Where: Sala Tirreno of Hotel Mediterraneo, Via Cavour 15 (near Termini train station, Termini subway stops on the A and B lines) Registration (at this site, required to reserve your spot): $150, covers only expenses for the meeting room. Refundable until 30 days before event. The two hotels below are just convenient suggestions, it is possible to find cheaper accommodations in Rome, just make sure you can make it to the meeting place. Hotel Mediterraneo (http://www.romehotelmediterraneo.it/) or Hotel Atlantico (https://www.romehotelatlantico.it) Single €100.00 – Double €120.00 Including buffet breakfast, wifi and standard taxes Room cancellation up to 48hr before Discount code: Summer Stoic School (for phone or email reservations only). Note that rooms are locked for our use until February 4st, after which it will be first-come first-serve Textbooks: Delphi Complete Works of Cicero, Delphi Ancient Classics Book 23 (https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/complete-works-of-cicero-delphi-classics-1) Cicero: The Life and Times of Rome's Greatest Politician, by Anthony Everitt, Random House (https://www.amazon.com/Cicero-Times-Romes-Greatest-Politician-ebook/dp/B003E8AJ2E/) How to Be a Stoic, by Massimo Pigliucci, Basic Books (https://www.indiebound.org/book/9781541644533) A Handbook for New Stoics: How to Thrive in a World Out of Your Control, by Massimo Pigliucci & Gregory Lopez, The Experiment (https://www.indiebound.org/book/9781615195336) Program: Thursday, July 18 Arrival at the hotels in the afternoon. Suggestion: dinner after the first session, when restaurants will be open and actually serve food... First session (7-9pm): Introduction to Stoicism. What is it? How did it come about? What is it good for? (Chapter 2 and Appendix of How to Be a Stoic) Cicero, his time, and his relationship to Stoicism (pretty much all of Everitt’s book) Friday, July 19 Morning session (9am-1pm, coffee, tea & snacks provided): Cicero’s De Finibus, book III: the argument in favor of Stoicism (Delphi Complete Works of Cicero) Live like a Stoic: the discipline of desire & aversion (part I of Pigliucci & Lopez) Lunch in small groups, local eateries (1-3pm) Afternoon session (3-7pm, coffee, tea & snacks provided): Cicero’s De Finibus, book IV: the argument against Stoicism (Delphi Complete Works of Cicero) Live like a Stoic: the discipline of action (part II of Pigliucci & Lopez) Group dinner at a Roman traditional restaurant (optional, cost of dinner not included in School's fee) Saturday, July 20 Morning session (9am-1pm, coffee, tea & snacks provided): Cicero’s Stoic Paradoxes (Delphi Complete Works of Cicero) Live like a Stoic: the discipline of assent (part III of Pigliucci & Lopez) Lunch in small groups, local eateries (1-3pm) Afternoon session (3-7pm, coffee, tea & snacks provided): Cicero’s Tusculan Disputations (Delphi Complete Works of Cicero) Live like a Stoic: putting together your own set of Stoic practices (Epilogue of Pigliucci & Lopez) Dinner in small groups, local eateries Sunday, July 21 Morning session (9am-12pm): general discussion about Stoicism as a philosophy of life; advice on how to keep your training going; overview of the next Rome Stoic School Lunch in small groups, local eateries Afternoon session (2-5pm): visit to Marcus Aurelius’ statue and Capitoline Museums (optional, cost not included in School's fee)

  • Epic battles in practical ethics: Stoicism vs Epicureanism

    New York Society for Ethical Culture

    Okay, folks, time to take on our cousins, the Epicureans! This meeting will explore the differences between Stoicism (Zeno there on the left in the photo) and Epicureanism (Epicurus on the right). We'll explore the two schools' take on metaphysics (how the world hangs together, epistemology (theory of knowledge), and -- of course -- ethics (how to live in the world). I'll be really disappointed if by the end of the discussion you will turn Epicurean, but of course I have no control over that, and it's a dispreferred indifferent to me... Suggested reading: https://www.patreon.com/posts/great-rivalries-20659585 Admission: $5 suggested donation, free for members of the Society for Ethical Culture. Learn more about our host organization, the New York Society for Ethical Culture, at http://www.ethical.nyc

  • How to practice Stoicism in 9 easy exercises

    New York Society for Ethical Culture

    Stoicism is a practical philosophy, so let's practice! At this meeting we'll explore nine simple exercises to make you a better Stoic. Some of them are to be done daily, some weekly, some occasionally. All of them will help you on your way to become a sage. Well, hopefully. Suggested reading: https://www.patreon.com/posts/how-i-practice-9-25137060 Admission: $5 suggested donation, free for members of the Society for Ethical Culture. Learn more about our host organization, the New York Society for Ethical Culture, at http://www.ethical.nyc

  • Stoicon-X New York!

    New York Society for Ethical Culture

    What? You can't make it to the annual Stoicon in Athens, on October 5th? (https://modernstoicism.com/save-the-date-stoicon-2019-in-athens/) Well, that's a dispreferred indifferent, of course. But you do have an alternative, if you live in New York City: Stoicon-X New York will take place on Thursday, September 19th, at the Society for Ethical Culture. Join Massimo Pigliucci, author of the new "A Handbook for New Stoics: How to Thrive in a World Out of Your Control" (https://www.amazon.com/Handbook-New-Stoics-Week-Week-ebook/dp/B07H12FP42/), Don Robertson, author of the new "How to Think Like a Roman Emperor: The Stoic Philosophy of Marcus Aurelius" (https://www.amazon.com/How-Think-Like-Roman-Emperor-ebook/dp/B07D2C5NNV/), and Bill Irvine, author of the new "The Stoic Challenge: A Philosopher's Guide to Becoming Tougher, Calmer, and More Resilient" (https://www.amazon.com/Stoic-Challenge-Philosophers-Becoming-Resilient-ebook/dp/B07P9DC6TY/) for an exceptional triple feature event beginning at 6pm. Program: 6:00pm - Welcome to Stoicon-X New York (Massimo Pigliucci) 6:15pm - Don Robertson: How to think like a Roman emperor 6:45pm: Q&A with Don 7:00pm - Bill Irvine: The Stoic challenge 7:30pm - Q&A with Bill 7:45pm - Massimo Pigliucci: How to thrive in a world out of your control 8:15 - Q&A with Massimo (Event over by 8:30pm) About the books: “In an age that equates virtue with frenzies of outrage and denunciations of others’ failings, A Handbook for New Stoics serves as an inspired self-help cure that, with insight and sympathy, will nudge you in the direction of the happiness and equanimity born of strength of character and wisdom.”—Rebecca Newberger Goldstein, author of Plato at the Googleplex "Robertson distills the emperor’s philosophy into useful mental habits...[he] displays a sound knowledge of Marcus' life and thought...[his] accessible prose style contributes to its appeal...[the] book succeeds on its own terms, presenting a convincing case for the continuing relevance of an archetypal philosopher-king." ―The Wall Street Journal "Irvine is a warm and friendly Stoic, and one of the great guides through the subject. His congenial writing offers strategies for the anxiety-free, supple kind of sturdiness with which we should all be greeting ourselves and the world." ―Derren Brown, mentalist, illusionist, and author of Happy