• The Inner Citadel: Finale

    Atrium of 60 Wall Street

    [Cross-posted by NYC Stoics: https://www.meetup.com/New-York-City-Stoics/events/257094260/] At this meetup, we will complete our year of Marcus Aurelius by finishing our discussion of the one of the most important and influential modern expositions of The Meditations (as well as Stoicism more generally): The Inner Citadel by Pierre Hadot. To prepare, please read Chapter 9 (Virtue and Joy) through the conclusion. Also, keep in mind any passages or concepts that you'd like to bring up to the group for discussion while you read, and bring your copy of the book along with you.

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  • Rome Stoic School on Seneca's Letters

    Hotel Mediterraneo

    $150.00

    [The handbook for this edition of the Rome Stoic School can be donwloaded here: https://tinyurl.com/y8grkllq; also, a short list of practical exercises to be discussed at the School can be found here: https://tinyurl.com/yc8l4hgd] [note: 1/3 discount on enrollment fee if you are a woman or minority, to be applied as partial reimbursement of full fee, after the School has taken place] What Spend three days in Rome studying ancient and modern Stoicism! Join Massimo and a small group of proficientes (students of Stoicism) to dig into Seneca's Letters to Lucilius, learn about practical Stoicism and how to apply it to your life. While there, walk through the Roman Fori or visit the National Roman Museum, and of course enjoy traditional Roman cuisine and local wines (don't worry, we won't accuse you of being an Epicurean...)! When & Where Thursday 1/10 (8pm) to Sunday 1/13 (6pm) Sala Tirreno of Hotel Mediterraneo, Via Cavour 15 (Near Termini train station, Cavour subway stop on the B line) Logistics Registration (at this site, required to reserve your spot): $150, covers only expenses for the meeting room. Refundable until 30 days before event. The two hotels below are just convenient suggestions, it is possible to find cheaper accommodations in Rome, just make sure you can make it to the meeting place, the Hotel Mediterraneo at Via Cavour 15. Hotel Mediterraneo (http://www.romehotelmediterraneo.it/) or Hotel Atlantico (http://www.romehotelatlantico.it/) Single €95.00 – Double €115.00 Including buffet breakfast, wifi and standard taxes Room cancellation up to 48hr before Discount code: Summer Stoic School (for phone or email reservations only) Textbooks Letters on Ethics, by Lucius Annaeus Seneca, University of Chicago Press. (http://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/L/bo20612233.html) How to Be a Stoic, by Massimo Pigliucci, Basic Books. (https://www.basicbooks.com/titles/massimo-pigliucci/how-to-be-a-stoic/9780465097951/) Program Thursday, January 10 Arrival at the hotels in the afternoon, early dinner on your own First session (8-10pm): Introduction to Stoicism. What is it? How did it come about? What is it good for? (Chapter 2 and Appendix of How to Be a Stoic, henceforth HTBAS) Friday, January 11 Morning (9am-1pm, coffee, tea & snacks provided): Seneca’s Letters to Lucilius Lunch in small groups, local eateries Afternoon (3-7pm, coffee, tea & snacks provided): practical Stoic exercises from Seneca, then more Letters to Lucilius Group dinner at a Roman traditional restaurant (optional, cost of dinner not included in School's fee) Saturday, January 12 Morning (9am-1pm, coffee, tea & snacks provided): Seneca’s Letters to Lucilius Lunch in small groups, local eateries Afternoon (3-7pm, coffee, tea & snacks provided): practical Stoic exercises from Seneca, then more Letters to Lucilius Dinner in small groups, local eateries Sunday, January 13 Morning (9am-12pm): general discussion about Stoicism as a philosophy of life; advice on how to keep your training going; overview of the next Rome Stoic School Lunch in small groups, local eateries Afternoon (2-6pm): visit to an ancient Roman site (optional, cost not included in School's fee)

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  • Should Stoics be feminists?

    New York Society for Ethical Culture

    The ancient Stoics had very progressive ideas about women. Zeno of Citium and Seneca explicitly say that women have the same mental faculties as men, and they therefore should be taught philosophy. But were the early Stoics feminist in the modern sense of the word? More importantly, should modern Stoics be feminists? Suggested reading: https://howtobeastoic.wordpress.com/2018/06/29/were-the-ancient-stoics-feminist-should-the-modern-ones-be/ Admission: $5 suggested donation, free for members of the Society for Ethical Culture.

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  • The Inner Citadel II

    Atrium of 60 Wall Street

    [Cross-posted by NYC Stoics: https://www.meetup.com/New-York-City-Stoics/events/256532096/] At this meetup, we will continue our year of Marcus Aurelius by carrying on with our discussion of the one of the most important and influential modern expositions of The Meditations (as well as Stoicism more generally): The Inner Citadel by Pierre Hadot. To prepare, please read Chapter 6 (The Inner Citadel, or the Discipline of Assent) through chapter 8 (The Discipline of Action, or Action in the Service of Mankind). Also, keep in mind any passages or concepts that you'd like to bring up to the group for discussion while you read, and bring your copy of the book along with you.

  • Should Stoics be vegetarians?

    New York Society for Ethical Culture

    Some of the ancient Stoics were vegetarians, but not all. Does Stoic philosophy entail vegetarianism, regardless of what individual Stoics may think or do? Suggested reading: https://howtobeastoic.wordpress.com/2018/07/17/stoics-should-be-vegetarian/ Admission: $5 suggested donation, free for members of the Society for Ethical Culture.

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  • The Inner Citadel I

    Atrium of 60 Wall Street

    [Cross-posted by NYC Stoics: https://www.meetup.com/New-York-City-Stoics/events/254540802/] At this meetup, we will continue our year of Marcus Aurelius by discussing the first third of one of the most important and influential modern expositions of The Meditations (as well as Stoicism more generally): The Inner Citadel by Pierre Hadot. To prepare, please read the Preface through Chapter 5 (The Stoicism of Epictetus) and bring your copy of the book with you for the discussion.

  • More from Epictetus' manual for the good life

    New York Society for Ethical Culture

    Time to continue our study of one of the primary sources of Stoicism: Epictetus' Enchiridion, a short manual to live life the Stoic way. We will resume from section 34, where the slave-turned-teacher tells us how to deal with pleasures... Admission: $5 suggested donation, free for members of the Society for Ethical Culture.

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  • Recap of Stoic Week & Stoicon 2018

    550 Madison Ave

    1) If you participated in Stoic Week, or practiced Massimo’s daily practice, share your experience, and hear others’ experiences. 2) If you attended Stoicon 2018, please come share your experiences with those who could not make it this year. Hear attendees speak about the Stoicon Conference. 3) You are welcome to attend if you are interested in Stoicism, even if you did not participate in Stoic Week or Stoicon 2018. ******* Stoic Week is an free online, self-guided one-week course introducing people to the practice of Stoicism in the modern world. The event is organized by Modern Stoicism (https://modernstoicism.com). It's great for people new to Stoicism, as well as people looking for guidance to actually put it into practice. The course starts on October 1. (https://modernstoicism.com/enroll-now-for-stoic-week-2018/) You can get a flavor of the event by checking out the Stoic Week Handbook from 2016 (http://modernstoicism.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/Stoic-Week-2016-Handbook-Stoicism-Today.pdf). Stoicon 2018 Modern Stoicism Conference https://modernstoicism.com/stoicon2018/

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  • Special meetup on Stoic Practice to Celebrate Stoic Week

    Join us to learn about Stoic practice. 2. The meeting will start with a chance for everyone to talk about their own experience with Stoicism for 2-4 minutes, as well as hear about others’ experience. 2. I will then give an informal talk about Stoic practice, to celebrate the upcoming Stoic Week. 3. We will discuss Stoic Week and meet others who will sign up for it. Stoic Week is an free online, self-guided one-week course introducing people to the practice of Stoicism in the modern world. The event is organized by Modern Stoicism (https://modernstoicism.com). It's great for people new to Stoicism, as well as people looking for guidance to actually put it into practice. The course starts on October 1 (https://modernstoicism.com/enroll-now-for-stoic-week-2018/). You can get a flavor of the event by checking out the Stoic Week Handbook from 2016 (http://modernstoicism.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/Stoic-Week-2016-Handbook-Stoicism-Today.pdf). Anyone who wishes to find out more about Stoicism is welcome!

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  • Meditations: Books XI and XII

    Atrium of 60 Wall Street

    [Cross-posted from NYC Stoics: https://www.meetup.com/New-York-City-Stoics/events/253738711/] At this meetup, we will continue our year of Marcus Aurelius by concluding our reading of Meditations. To prepare for the meetup, please read books 11 and 12 of the Meditations, and mark at least one passage which you would like to bring up for discussion. I will personally be working from Robin Hard's translation of the Meditations. This non-public domain translation is my favorite for study purposes. However, there are two other translations that I also recommend: * Gregory Hays' non-public domain translation is a downright beautiful read. I recommend it if you're looking for an inspiring and engrossing read. However, Hays does take liberties in translating from the original Greek in my opinion, which makes this translation sometimes difficult to use in comparing Marcus' thought in the context of Stoic theory at times. * If you're looking for a free public domain translation, I strongly recommend GA Rendall's translation: https://archive.org/details/marcusaureliusa01rendgoog * Another third good public domain translation is George Long's. It uses thees and thous, though: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_Thoughts_of_the_Emperor_Marcus_Aurelius_Antoninus

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