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FREE CONCERT: MONTGOMERY PHILHARMONIC at Watkins Mill High School

  • Feb 27, 2014 · 7:00 PM
  • This location is shown only to members

 

Montgomery Philharmonic

Reinventing the Community Orchestra

                             A Confluence of Culture

Using the words confluence and culture in the same phrase brings out the essence of music in numerous ways. During its 2013‒2014 concert season, the Montgomery Philharmonic will explore the confluence of culture that exists in music. We will delve into the structure, harmonies, melodies, and rhythms that create music. From region to region, genre to genre, and style to style around the world, music contains confluences that make it magical, fascinating, and enchanting.

Our third concert takes a look at the music of North America. This exciting concert celebrates youth in our community, linking both old and young musicians. The Montgomery Philharmonic and music students from Watkins Mill High School will host the annual Bernie Rappaport Young Musician Competition for Middle School Students for talented flutists this year. We will also play music by two Mexican composers, Silvestre Revueltas and Arturo Marquez, and American composers Morton Gould and Aaron Copland, as well as the premiere of a commissioned work for strings composed by Doris Gazda, a former Montgomery County Schools music teacher.

Montgomery Philharmonic 2013 - 2014 Concert Season – A Confluence of Culture  Music of North America – February 27, 2014

Márquez | Hanson | Gazda | Copland | Gould

Arturo Márquez  – Danzón No. 2 (1994)  This piece puts Márquez in a group of the four most important composers from Mexico – José Pablo Moncayo, Carlos Chávez, Silvestre Revueltas, and, of course, Arturo Márquez. The work was commissioned for the National Autonomous University of Mexico’s Philharmonic Orchestra and was debuted in 1994. It features solo sections for piano, violin, trumpet, and clarinet. The rhythmic quality of the piece is at the center of the composition; accents shift throughout the piece making it feel as if the tempo is shifting when, in reality, the accents are doing this work.
The danzón has its roots in a Cuban dance form and is also a very important part of folklore in the Mexican state of Veracruz. The Golden Age of the danzón was the 1940’s, when it was very popular in the ballrooms and dance halls of Mexico.
In 2009, a movie was made using this piece as the background for the subject of danzón. In the movie, Márquez makes a cameo appearance as the pianist in the dance hall orchestra.
Márquez’ danzóns are now being used not only in film, but also on stage with ballets.

Howard Hanson – Serenade for Flute, Harp, and Strings, Opus 35
This piece is unique in that it was a marriage proposal gift from Howard Hanson to his wife, Margaret Elizabeth Nelson. He said that he could not find the words to express his love for her, so he wrote the piece. It is described as the perfect wedding present – ardent, romantic, and lovely. Along with these wonderful attributes, the piece has a strong rhythmic pulse and also a beautiful flowing scale that Hanson created especially for it.
The piece was premiered in 1945 by Georges Laurent and the Boston Symphony Orchestra with Serge Koussevitzky conducting. This serenade, along with Griffes’ Poem and Kennan’s Night Soliloquy, are now the major American contributions to literature for classical flute with orchestra.

Doris Gazda – The Miller’s Fiddler (2014)This piece is unique in that it was a marriage proposal gift from Howard Hanson to his wife, Margaret Elizabeth Nelson. He said that he could not find the words to express his love for her, so he wrote the piece. It is described as the perfect wedding present – ardent, romantic, and lovely. Along with these wonderful attributes, the piece has a strong rhythmic pulse and also a beautiful flowing scale that Hanson created especially for it.
The piece was premiered in 1945 by Georges Laurent and the Boston Symphony Orchestra with Serge Koussevitzky conducting. This serenade, along with Griffes’ Poem and Kennan’s Night Soliloquy, are now the major American contributions to literature for classical flute with orchestra.

Aaron Copland – An Outdoor Overture (1938)An Outdoor Overture came about as the result of a request by Alexander Richter, a high school orchestra director. Richter was beginning a long-term plan to study “American music for American youth,” and took the chance of asking Copland to compose for his school. He chose Copland because he had recently altered his style from one of austere dissonance to one of folkish simplicity, which appealed to Richter, who felt it was the most American-like music that he had ever heard. Copland delivered four pieces during this period of time – El Salón México in 1936, the high school opera The Second Hurricane in 1937, and then two works—An Outdoor Overture and the first of his Americana ballets, Billy the Kid—in 1938. Richter premiered An Outdoor Overture with the orchestra of The High School of Music & Art in New York City. The Second Hurricane—Copland’s first attempt at composing opera—was commissioned by the Henry Street Settlement School, also in New York City, and performed by students at its music school; it premiered on April 21, 1937 at the school’s playhouse. The premiere production was designed by Orson Welles and conducted by Lehman Engel.
When composing An Outdoor Overture, Copland took into account the fact that the school’s orchestra was a very fine one, so he included many features that a professional orchestra would be capable of playing. Copland was careful to limit the technical difficulties, while, at the same time, creating a piece that had melodic simplicity and beauty as well as rhythmic syncopation, and which gave the musical world some of its first glimpses of a harmonic language that would later be called “quartal harmony.”

Morton Gould – American Salute (1943)
American Salute by Morton Gould is a fantasy based on the song When Johnny Comes Marching Home Again. The work was originally written for orchestra but Gould quickly transcribed it for concert band. The piece was written for a radio broadcast on the Mutual Radio Network for Lincoln’s birthday. Gould’s producer asked him to write a patriotic piece in the wake of the Pearl Harbor invasion; it was written in one night and performed the following day (he actually began the composition after dinner and finished it just in time for the 9:00 a.m. broadcast).
In this set of fantasy-variations, the simple melody was written in both major and minor keys, with Gould giving it rhythmic and harmonic treatment to help to bring out his vision for the fantasy. Written during World War II, the emotional content of the piece is sentimental without being excessively so. In the fantasy-variations, Gould used the entire orchestra, casting the woodwind, brass, strings, and percussion in the melody at various times while using the extremes of very soft to very loud dynamics and a variety of accompaniment figures to create excitement.
The piece was played at a United States Military Academy Concert Band concert that he attended on the last day of his life, and it has proved to be the most popular piece that he wrote.

Hoping we can get together for a nibble and a drink nearby after the concert if it's not too late.

 

All aboard, Mates!   

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  • Lillian W.

    Thanks to Carol for braving the cold and winds. I am glad I went and stayed.

    Except for some minor interruptions to get the young musicians on and off the stage, the philharmonc sounded wonderful. The Serenade featured 3 middle school flutists who won a county-wide competition performing an original fiddle work (by a local music educator?), Marquez's Danzon was upbeat and dramatic, Copland's Outdoor Overture was grand, and we finale'd with American Salute (based on the familiar When Johnny Comes Marching Home Again).

    February 28, 2014

  • Lillian W.

    I'm in the theater lobby with just to the right of the auditorium I'm in a black coat and blue scarf there is a $10 donation expected at the door

    February 27, 2014

  • Penny Jones R.

    I have had an upset stomach for several days and just don't feel up to attending, and since Julie had to cancal I am sorry but I am too. I had trouble getting onto the web site for some reason. See ya at the MC concert hopefully.

    February 27, 2014

  • Julie R.

    Sorry had something with my son come up so have to cancel. Looking forward to mc concert

    February 27, 2014

2 went

  • Lillian W.
    First Mate, Co-Organizer,
    Event Host
  • A former member

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