What we're about

Do you have an interest in becoming better acquainted with the Bible? Let's read it together and share in the discovery! As we think together through the scriptures our goal will be to discover the original intent of the inspired writers. We will not be interested in what the scriptures mean to me in 2019, but what they meant when they were first written. For what they meant at that time is what they still mean today! The very nature of this approach will make the study completely undenominational.

• Are you ready to stop trading opinions about the scriptures to start a real Bible study?

• Would you like to know how the whole book fits together?

• Would you like to read the Bible with more confidence?

• Do you wish the Bible was more useful in your daily life?

If you’re interested in such a meetup, then please visit us. If you have further questions, don't hesitate to contact us. We look forward to meeting you.

Upcoming events (5+)

West Philly Assembly of Christ - An Invitation to Worship

This is a meetup with a difference -- to worship God and to be attentive to his word. When you visit our Sunday assembly here is what you should expect: 1. Since the Scriptures are our only rule of faith and practice (cf., 2 Timothy 3:16-17; Acts 17:11), expect us to conduct our congregational meetings in accordance to what we read in the Bible, specifically the New Testament writings which are the only infallible source anyone has of the teaching of Jesus. We endeavor to worship God as he instructed the early Christians to worship. We avoid things not authorized in Scripture and things that could distract from the spiritual purpose of our assemblies. 2. Prayer to God in the name of Jesus Christ (1 Timothy 2:1; Philippians 4:6) 3. Singing praises to God that teach and encourage each member to grow in their faith and their faithfulness(Ephesians 5:19; Colossians 3:16) 4. Teaching from the Bible that convicts us, challenges us, and helps us to grow into the image of Christ (Acts 2:42; 2 Timothy 4:1-5) 5. The Lord’s Supper (Sundays). This weekly memorial is both a reminder and public proclamation of the death of Jesus Christ (Acts 20:7; 1 Corinthians 11:23-29). Because His sacrificial death paid the penalty for our sins, we can be forgiven and have peace with God. 6. Voluntarily giving by the members each Sunday to help needy brethren and promote the spread of the Gospel (1 Corinthians 16:1-2; Philippians 4:14-16). PLEASE NOTE: Visitors are not expected to participate in this giving. We do not pass a basket or otherwise solicit funds from our visitors through donations, fundraisers, love-offerings for the speaker, etc. If you have any questions about what we do (or don’t do), please email us: [masked]

The Wrath of the Lamb: Thinking Through the Book of Revelation

Come and share in a discussion of the scriptures and the camaraderie of this group. Since our beginning, we have read and thought ourselves through the gospel of Luke and the book of Acts, the first and second epistles of Peter and the gospel of John. Now we are tackling the book of Revelation. In Revelation 1:1 we learn that the revelation was given by God through His angel who "signified it" to John. (KJV, NKJV) The ESV and NIV say that God "made it know" to John and the NASB says that it was "communicated" to him. In all of these cases, the idea from the Greek is that this revelation was made known to John through SIGNS (cf., 12:1, 3; 13:13, 14; 15:1; 16:14; 19:20). This begs the question: What framework shall we use to interpret these signs? Four of the most popular ways are 1. FUTURIST (PRE-MILLENNIAL: the majority of Revelation -- everything after chapter 3 -- to be fulfilled in our future), 2. CONTINUOUS HISTORICAL (ADVENTISTS & OTHERS: the blueprint of world history), 3. PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY (Pictorial Victory of Good Over Evil) and 4. PARTIAL PRETERIST (The book was mostly fulfilled in the first century with the fall of Jerusalem in A.D. 70 or several centuries later with the fall of the Roman Empire.) How will we determine our course when thinking through this book? Come and see. We look forward to having you join our motley crew.

Thinking Through the Wisdom of Solomon: The Book of Proverbs

This meetup will be conducted in the dining area on the 2nd floor. If you have any questions about this series and/or if you would like more information about who we are, please do not hesitate to contact us. We look forward to meeting you.

Thinking Through Jeremiah and Lamentations

Croydon Hall Apartments (Basement)

Josiah, the last of righteous kings of Judah, reigned from 641/40-609 B.C. Jeremiah began his work in the thirteenth year of his reign (Jeremiah 1:2). The historical background relevant to Jeremiah's work is found at 2 Kings 21-25 and 2 Chronicles 33-36. After the death of the good king Hezekiah, Manasseh corrupted Judah to a point from which there would be no return (2 Kings 21; 2 Chronicles 33). His repentance and reformation at the end (2 Chronicles 33:10-20) had no deep or permanent effect on the nation. (This was likely the reason why it is not even mentioned in Kings.) Amon, his son, reigned for only two years and returned to idolatry. Even with Josiah's reforms (2 Kings 22-23; 2 Chron 34-35), the nation could not be saved. For though they were genuine with Josiah, they were superficial with the people who were never really converted (cf., Jeremiah 3:10). Destruction was decreed in spite of the reforms because of the sins of Manasseh which remained in the hearts of the people and had not really been effectively eradicated from the nation (2 Kings 23.26; cf. 24.3-4; Jer 15.4). Josiah, the last of righteous kings of Judah, reigned from 641/40-609 B.C. Jeremiah began his work in the thirteenth year of his reign (Jeremiah 1:2). The historical background relevant to Jeremiah's work is found at 2 Kings 21-25 and 2 Chronicles 33-36. After the death of the good king Hezekiah, Manasseh corrupted Judah to a point from which there would be no return (2 Kings 21; 2 Chron 33). His repentance and reformation at the end (2 Chronicles 33:10-20) had no deep or permanent effect on the nation. (This was likely the reason why it is not even mentioned in Kings.) Amon, his son, reigned for only two years and returned to idolatry. Even with Josiah's reforms (2 Kings 22-23; 2 Chron 34-35), the nation could not be saved. For though they were genuine with Josiah, they were superficial with the people who were never really converted (cf., Jeremiah 3:10). Destruction was decreed in spite of the reforms because of the sins of Manasseh which remained in the hearts of the people and had not really been effectively eradicated from the nation (2 Kings 23.26; cf. 24.3-4; Jer 15.4). The first twenty chapters of Jeremiah report the preaching of the prophet during the time of Josiah and expose the weakness of Josiah's reformation (cf. esp. 3.6-10). When the evil Jehoiakim came to the throne, the floodgates were opened, and the apostasy which had been outwardly restrained under Josiah burst forth to fill the land. Judgment day was just ahead. Jeremiah was to be God's spokesman in Judah's darkest days.

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