• Walkabout, casual length based on willingness

    Location visible to members

    Humber Arboretum walkabout from 850 Humberwood Boulevard, Etobicoke, ON M9W 7A6, Canada

  • Weekly Ravine Walks to Evergreen Brick Works

    Taylor Creek

    Part of a weekly hiking series through Toronto's Ravines and from one greenspace to the next. We meet in a patch of green somewhere in Toronto and walk to the Brick Works. Walks start at 10am every Saturday.

  • Last minute: Exploring the Rosedale Ravine - Plan future ravine walks

    Location visible to members

    Okay, so this is very last minute. In any event, the weather is great today and is looking great for tomorrow. So, I thought I would put this up. But, also I would to get these ravine walks going on a regular basis and would like your feedback/thoughts on where you would like to explore. Although, this is NOT in Toronto, I would like to suggest a day trip to Inglis Falls. I was there last year and it was really incredible. Even if you can't make "short notice for tomorrow" please leave comment with your thoughts. Here is a link to Inglis Falls: http://ontarioconservationareas.ca/component/mtree/conservation-authorities-of-ontario/grey-sauble/inglis-falls-conservation-area Anyway, we can talk about this while exploring (my favorite) the Rosedale ravine tomorrow April 18. The benefits of the ravine are described as follows (http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2009/03/23/the_walk_of_the_town_torontos_best_trails.html): "He was looking for a job and feeling tense. He needed to walk. A friend suggested he take the stairs from Heath St. E., near St. Clair subway station, into a southbound trail along Yellow Creek. "Suddenly, I felt transported out of the city," he recalls. "I was walking beside a stream in a forest. I heard the birds, it was so quiet. "I thought, `If somebody hadn't told me about this, I would never have known.'" __________________________________ Two hour walk, stop for Coffee at the end. Note that we will end at a different location from where we begin. You may want to bring money for a coffee at the end a subway token to return. Make sure you have appropriate footware! http://www.ontariotrails.on.ca/trails-a-z/rosedale-ravine-trail The Rosedale Ravine is amazing because it's right in the centre of Toronto (http://www.ontariotrails.on.ca/trails-a-z/rosedale-ravine-trail). It starts right at Yonge and St. Clair. You've got the hustle and bustle, then you just duck down that sidestreet, Heath Street East, go down the staircase and suddenly you're immersed in the forest walking along a creek. You feel like you're transported miles away from the city. The Rosedale Ravine is a loop. To the south it takes you down to the Bayview Extension, north up to Moore Avenue or you can take it to Mount Pleasant Cemetery (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Pleasant_Cemetery,_Toronto), across that old railway bridge that's now a foot bridge across Yonge Street. Farther north, you can take it to the old Belt Line trail, the old railway that went through Forest Hill. You emerge from this forest and you're at a subway station. Some of the trees in Toronto's ravines are now more than 150 years old. They survived the urbanization of Toronto, and are part of our living history. Ravines are highly sensitive areas. They are storehouses of water and vegetation. When the topography, water flow or the natural plant community is altered in any way, the ecology and function of the ravine are also affected. Information provided by the Toronto (http://www.toronto.ca/) website.

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  • Last minute: Exploring the Rosedale Ravine

    Location visible to members

    Let's continue exploring this great ravine. The benefits of the ravine are described as follows (http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2009/03/23/the_walk_of_the_town_torontos_best_trails.html): "He was looking for a job and feeling tense. He needed to walk. A friend suggested he take the stairs from Heath St. E., near St. Clair subway station, into a southbound trail along Yellow Creek. "Suddenly, I felt transported out of the city," he recalls. "I was walking beside a stream in a forest. I heard the birds, it was so quiet. "I thought, `If somebody hadn't told me about this, I would never have known.'" __________________________________ Two hour walk, stop for Coffee at the end. Note that we will end at a different location from where we begin. You may want to bring money for a coffee at the end a subway token to return. Make sure you have appropriate footware! http://www.ontariotrails.on.ca/trails-a-z/rosedale-ravine-trail The Rosedale Ravine is amazing because it's right in the centre of Toronto (http://www.ontariotrails.on.ca/trails-a-z/rosedale-ravine-trail). It starts right at Yonge and St. Clair. You've got the hustle and bustle, then you just duck down that sidestreet, Heath Street East, go down the staircase and suddenly you're immersed in the forest walking along a creek. You feel like you're transported miles away from the city. The Rosedale Ravine is a loop. To the south it takes you down to the Bayview Extension, north up to Moore Avenue or you can take it to Mount Pleasant Cemetery (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Pleasant_Cemetery,_Toronto), across that old railway bridge that's now a foot bridge across Yonge Street. Farther north, you can take it to the old Belt Line trail, the old railway that went through Forest Hill. You emerge from this forest and you're at a subway station. Some of the trees in Toronto's ravines are now more than 150 years old. They survived the urbanization of Toronto, and are part of our living history. Ravines are highly sensitive areas. They are storehouses of water and vegetation. When the topography, water flow or the natural plant community is altered in any way, the ecology and function of the ravine are also affected. Information provided by the Toronto (http://www.toronto.ca/) website.

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  • Let's explore Maxome Park!

    Maxome Park

    Bayview & Finch area has this hidden ravine within a park/field I used to always take photographs in when I was in high-school. I really think that if we go around fall time it would be best because the leaves are just sooo gorgeous!

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  • Let's explore Maxome Park!

    Maxome Park

    As per the suggestion of our newest member Samantha: "Bayview & Finch area has this hidden ravine within a park/field I used to always take photographs in when I was in high-school. I really think that if we go around fall time it would be best because the leaves are just sooo gorgeous!" http://www1.toronto.ca/parks/prd/facilities/complex/1868/index.htm

  • Another chance: Let's Continue exploring the Rosedale Ravine

    Location visible to members

    Let's continue exploring this great ravine. The benefits of the ravine are described as follows (http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2009/03/23/the_walk_of_the_town_torontos_best_trails.html): "He was looking for a job and feeling tense. He needed to walk. A friend suggested he take the stairs from Heath St. E., near St. Clair subway station, into a southbound trail along Yellow Creek. "Suddenly, I felt transported out of the city," he recalls. "I was walking beside a stream in a forest. I heard the birds, it was so quiet. "I thought, `If somebody hadn't told me about this, I would never have known.'" __________________________________ Two hour walk, stop for Coffee at the end. Bring your dog. Note that we will end at a different location from where we begin. You may want to bring money for a coffee at the end a subway token to return. Make sure you have appropriate footware! http://www.ontariotrails.on.ca/trails-a-z/rosedale-ravine-trail The Rosedale Ravine is amazing because it's right in the centre of Toronto (http://www.ontariotrails.on.ca/trails-a-z/rosedale-ravine-trail). It starts right at Yonge and St. Clair. You've got the hustle and bustle, then you just duck down that sidestreet, Heath Street East, go down the staircase and suddenly you're immersed in the forest walking along a creek. You feel like you're transported miles away from the city. The Rosedale Ravine is a loop. To the south it takes you down to the Bayview Extension, north up to Moore Avenue or you can take it to Mount Pleasant Cemetery (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Pleasant_Cemetery,_Toronto), across that old railway bridge that's now a foot bridge across Yonge Street. Farther north, you can take it to the old Belt Line trail, the old railway that went through Forest Hill. You emerge from this forest and you're at a subway station. Some of the trees in Toronto's ravines are now more than 150 years old. They survived the urbanization of Toronto, and are part of our living history. Ravines are highly sensitive areas. They are storehouses of water and vegetation. When the topography, water flow or the natural plant community is altered in any way, the ecology and function of the ravine are also affected. Information provided by the Toronto (http://www.toronto.ca/) website.

  • Taylor Creek Park Ravine Walk

    cullen bryant park

    This will be an interesting walk - have cycled this route many times. I will update the information in the next day or so. But for some descriptions see: https://torontoravines.wordpress.com/2014/06/27/walkabout-in-taylor-creek/ and http://www.ontariotrails.on.ca/trails/view/taylor-creek-trail Look forward to seeing you on this long weekend.

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  • Let's Continue exploring the Rosedale Ravine

    Location visible to members

    Let's continue exploring this great ravine. The benefits of the ravine are described as follows (http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2009/03/23/the_walk_of_the_town_torontos_best_trails.html): "He was looking for a job and feeling tense. He needed to walk. A friend suggested he take the stairs from Heath St. E., near St. Clair subway station, into a southbound trail along Yellow Creek. "Suddenly, I felt transported out of the city," he recalls. "I was walking beside a stream in a forest. I heard the birds, it was so quiet. "I thought, `If somebody hadn't told me about this, I would never have known.'" __________________________________ Two hour walk, stop for Coffee at the end. Bring your dog. Note that we will end at a different location from where we begin. You may want to bring money for a coffee at the end a subway token to return. Make sure you have appropriate footware! http://www.ontariotrails.on.ca/trails-a-z/rosedale-ravine-trail The Rosedale Ravine is amazing because it's right in the centre of Toronto (http://www.ontariotrails.on.ca/trails-a-z/rosedale-ravine-trail). It starts right at Yonge and St. Clair. You've got the hustle and bustle, then you just duck down that sidestreet, Heath Street East, go down the staircase and suddenly you're immersed in the forest walking along a creek. You feel like you're transported miles away from the city. The Rosedale Ravine is a loop. To the south it takes you down to the Bayview Extension, north up to Moore Avenue or you can take it to Mount Pleasant Cemetery (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Pleasant_Cemetery,_Toronto), across that old railway bridge that's now a foot bridge across Yonge Street. Farther north, you can take it to the old Belt Line trail, the old railway that went through Forest Hill. You emerge from this forest and you're at a subway station. Some of the trees in Toronto's ravines are now more than 150 years old. They survived the urbanization of Toronto, and are part of our living history. Ravines are highly sensitive areas. They are storehouses of water and vegetation. When the topography, water flow or the natural plant community is altered in any way, the ecology and function of the ravine are also affected. Information provided by the Toronto (http://www.toronto.ca/) website.

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  • Let's begin with the Rosedale Ravine

    Location visible to members

    After our failed attempts in the winter - great weather has arrived. Two hour walk, stop for Coffee at the end. Bring your dog. Note that we will end at a different location from where we begin. You may want to bring money for a coffee at the end a subway token to return. Make sure you have appropriate footware! http://www.ontariotrails.on.ca/trails-a-z/rosedale-ravine-trail The Rosedale Ravine is amazing because it's right in the centre of Toronto (http://www.ontariotrails.on.ca/trails-a-z/rosedale-ravine-trail). It starts right at Yonge and St. Clair. You've got the hustle and bustle, then you just duck down that sidestreet, Heath Street East, go down the staircase and suddenly you're immersed in the forest walking along a creek. You feel like you're transported miles away from the city. The Rosedale Ravine is a loop. To the south it takes you down to the Bayview Extension, north up to Moore Avenue or you can take it to Mount Pleasant Cemetery (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Pleasant_Cemetery,_Toronto), across that old railway bridge that's now a foot bridge across Yonge Street. Farther north, you can take it to the old Belt Line trail, the old railway that went through Forest Hill. You emerge from this forest and you're at a subway station. Some of the trees in Toronto's ravines are now more than 150 years old. They survived the urbanization of Toronto, and are part of our living history. Ravines are highly sensitive areas. They are storehouses of water and vegetation. When the topography, water flow or the natural plant community is altered in any way, the ecology and function of the ravine are also affected. Information provided by the Toronto (http://www.toronto.ca/) website.

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