Past Meetup

Pick a Spot & Shoot III

This Meetup is past

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Details

This meet up is based on the exercise "Change" I found in Freeman Patterson's "Photography and the Art of Seeing". The goal of this exercise is to challenge and expand how we see and photograph the world.

The Walk-About

We'll meet at the Globe Statue in the roundabout that is located at Keefer Place right by the Stadium-Chinatown Skytrain Station. Click here for a Google maps street view of the statue (http://goo.gl/maps/FmNul).

From there we will take turns using a random method to find spots to photograph and shoot throughout this area. Details of Patterson's actual exercise is noted below. In this meetup we will work within confined physical space at every spot and try to shoot at least 20 photos in each location. This is to help us work through the classic "there is nothing to shoot" or on days when you are not "seeing the photo" or feeling the inspiration.

You can take the approach of being open to the inspiration that arises, the emergent opportunities that arise in being patient or you can I focusing on a style or approach to photography to help you see the photography in each spot. For example, abstract, macro, street, b&w, motion, etc. Either approach works. The key is to be present at each spot and challenge your comfort zone.

At the end we'll have a coffee/tea/dessert at Save-on-Meats Diner (http://goo.gl/maps/FXDZT) (next to 43 W Hastings in between Carrall & Abbott) to talk and share photos.

Exercise 1
Pick a spot and mark the spot. Take seven more steps from the spot you marked. The seven steps from your original stopping point form the radius of a circle, in which you should proceed to shoot at least 20 images. Don't set a limit of two or three pictures, because that will not be enough to start you seeing. You should feel desperation during this exercise. You will only start to make visual breakthroughs when you've exhausted the obvious picture possibilities. If you want to challenge yourself, make 30 or 40 or 50 images instead.

Additional Information & Background
Chance
One thing you'll notice, when you view your results, is a number of happy accidents. You'll probably find several if you have been generous in your shooting. it's false economy to be stingy with film or with space on your memory card when experimenting with new ideas, so don't limit yourself to just a few photographs; make at least ten pictures for each exercise. Give many happy accidents a chance to happen.
Photographers who want to see in new ways should be sensitive to chance. They should encourage and cultivate it, because it is only through chance that many new opportunities for visual development will ever occur.

When reviewing your photographs look for new approaches in the photographs: new ideas or unusual departure s, regardless of techincal merit. Please try and post a minimum of 5 photographs from each spot from today's meetup so that we can all appreciate each other's "point of view"

Let's be inspired by be new ideas and stimulate our creativity.

The Aim

The function of the group is to learn and practice the techniques of photography. For our group, this involves learning photography not only from your guides but also from your group-mates. Another important aspect is getting to know other members of the group.

Meets

The attendant size of the meets will be kept small, about twenty. This is to keep the meet more intimate, where participants can have the opportunity to get to know all their group-mates and spend time with a guide.

If you select to attend a meet and then cannot make it, please be courteous to others in the group and change your RSVP status as soon as possible to allow others who might be on the waiting list the chance to participate.

After

What will be appreciated are ratings and, especially, comments to individual meets and the group dynamic as a whole. This is important because it will ultimately add value to our meetings and improve our experience.

As well, feel comfortable in posting your photographs and advising others; critical appraisal is encouraged.