Past Meetup

Happy Birthday to us! Ethiopian Cuisine

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"What the Pho!" is 6 years old on June 13th. Let's celebrate!

Ethiopian food was probably the catalyst that made me start this group. No one would go with me to eat it - friends, coworkers... I ate alone holding a book. Do you have any idea how hard it is to eat Ethiopian food while trying to read a book?

Since the first time I tried Ethiopian food at the age of 17 (20++ years ago, shhh - a lady never tells her age) in Washington DC, I fell in LOVE. It was a combination of my mother's Southern/"soul food" cooking mixed with Indian spices.

Ethiopian food is VEGETARIAN friendly.

Rules for eating Ethiopian food:

1. Wash your hands.

2. Injera is the staple bread and is used as your utensil. It is a flat, spongy, slightly sour bread (think giant crepe, made from teff flour). Use small pieces to scoop up your food and enjoy.

3. You can ask for a fork but not as much fun.

4. You can order individual dishes or multiple people can join together and share sampler platters (my suggestion), that's the concept of Ethiopian food "sharing" - thus, wash your hands. Share your food and enjoy!

5. Wash your hands again (see a pattern here). They will smell like cardamom for days.

They do accept debit and credit cards and will split our bills.

Directions:

Just south of the I-24 & Harding Place behind Sam’s Club on Antioch Pike at Perimeter Hill Drive intersect. If you are unsure how to get there, call me #[masked].

Look forward to seeing you there!

Rose

Mesob’s website: http://www.mesobcuisine.com/

Mesob’s Menu: http://www.mesobcuisine.com/menu.htm (http://www.mesobcuisine.com/revisedMenu.pdf)

More about Ethiopian Cuisine: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethiopian_cuisine

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Mesob-Ethiopian-Restaurant-Nashville/165539140205444

Basics:

Hello: selam

Welcome: merhaba

Good morning: dehaando hadrika (m) / hadirkee (f)

Good afternoon: dehaando weelka (m) / weelkee (f)

Good evening: dehaando amsika (m) / amsikee (f)

Goodbye: dehaan kun

Yes: u-we

No: aykonen

Please: bejaka (m) bejakee (f)

Thank you: yekanyeley

Excuse me: yikrie-ta

I'm sorry: aytehazeley

How are you?: kemay aleka (m)/ alekee (f)

My name is.: shemey. iyu

I don't understand: ayeterede-anen