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Windy City Skaters Message Board › Where to buy inline skates

Where to buy inline skates

Kirsten
KirstenML
Group Organizer
Chicago, IL
Post #: 162
This question keeps coming up. I wish I could point to a store in Chicago but the sad truth is there aren't really any skate stores left. Londo Mondo may have a few K2 Skates, Sport Authority may have too but the selection is usually very limited. Most of us order skates online at:

www.inlinewarehouse.com

If you are just starting out and don't know what to get we usually recommend buying K2 or Rollerblade brands. Both are good skates and are in the lower price range.

If you want to go a little more high end, consider buying SEBA skates.

Whatever you do, do not get skates at Wal-mart or Target. Most of them have a plastic brake (instead of rubber) and the boots give very little stability. They will make it very hard for a beginner to learn in them.

If you have more specific goals, i.e. speed skating, aggressive skating or slalom skating, shoot me an e-mail and I can point you in the right direction or get you in touch with the right people.

Happy Skating!

Kirsten
Dan
user 159524812
Chicago, IL
Post #: 2
If I may I would like to recommend this company in Seattle called SHOP TASK. They carry SEBA Skates. I find these skates to be very high quality.
http://shop-task.com/...­

Also when measuring your foot for SEBA skates this is the method that should be used. https://www.youtube.c...­

here are the charts I found very useful after measuring your foot.
http://www.theskateno...­

http://skatecrazy.net...­
Kwang
user 163118532
Chicago, IL
Post #: 1
Londo Mondo still sells a full line of K2 skates and updates their stock every year. You just don't really know it from the store front. I've had many questionable looks skating into what looks to be female apparel (including beach and yoga wear) :).
David
user 184382031
Chicago, IL
Post #: 1
This is a small family owned skate shop in South Suburbs. They are a font of good information although don't keep a lot of inventory on hand, they are very willing to bring in your selections and let you try them on before you purchase. http://www.thehomewoo...­
A former member
Post #: 1
Yesterday after lots of disappointments with my first pair of K2 boots and a complete failure of my rollerblade frames.. I combined the two... Now I got a good hybrid pair of rollerblade boots wit K2 frames.... Only walk-in place in Chicago that I know, as Kwang pointed out, got only K2's but the boots are universally reviled because your feet shift in them. The rollerblade boots I got are not that great but they work.... I am happier now but I have had it much better in the past.
David C.
chartier
Chicago, IL
Post #: 1
I've been a member for a while but haven't got off my duff to attend, so I'm going to shoot for the road rave on the 18th. It'll be good to finally meet this group!

Could I ask a favor thougH? I'm thinking about getting new skates. I have a good pair of K2 Motos that serve me well, but I wonder if they aren't quite suited to my skate interests anymore. If anyone has advice I would be very thankful. I like to:

- skate 5-10 miles on the lakefront trail at a brisk pace, but
- stop in a few spots and practice some basic rollerhockey moves like quick stops, spins, skating backwards, etc. No park skating or rail grinding though
- get off the trail sometimes and explore the city, especially the loop, printer's row, McCormick, etc.
- have some kind of a lace assist/cinching system in addition to the plastic/velcro bands to make suiting up easier

I just bought a pair of Seba FRX 84s but I'm returning them because I missed they had a fully manual lace system. If anyone has ideas on something else to try, thanks a lot in advance!
Kirsten
KirstenML
Group Organizer
Chicago, IL
Post #: 167
My first suggestion would have been SEBA but sounds like you already tried them. Although I think the SEBA Trix are a little easier to lace up since they don't have an inside liner but I am unaware of any skates with a lace assist system. My experience with that from snowboard boots is that nothing stays as tight as regular old laces.
A former member
Post #: 1
Hi Kirsten,

It was nice to meet you and the other skaters last Friday night. It was a great skate and I hope to continue skating with the group.

I was also pleased to see the suggestions about skates. I do plan to upgrade and have been looking at some of the Rollerblade and K2 skates with 90mm wheels. Does anyone have any specific suggestions about models to consider? Thanks for any advice.

The next rave I do, I plan to wear some protection pads so I don't feel so vulnerable on the road. :)
Kirsten
KirstenML
Group Organizer
Chicago, IL
Post #: 168
Hi Bill,

Nice meeting you too. I am glad you enjoyed the skate! Yes, pads will definitely help :).
What skates to get will depend on what you intend to do. Do you just want to skate along the path, road raves etc.? Or do you plan to do any freestyle skating or speed skating? K2 and Rollerblade are both good skates. Generally smaller wheels and a shorter frame will make turning easier and in my opinion they are just more fun. If you are looking for speed, go for a longer frame and bigger wheels. I personally use 80mm wheels on a pretty short frame. Look into SEBA as well but note that they do not come with a heel break, but I believe it can be ordered seperately. http://www.inlineware...­

Hope this helps.
Kirsten
Ryan
paintingjack1
Aurora, IL
Post #: 2
As someone who inline skates on 90mm wheels and spends (way too much) time at the roller rinks around speed skaters I can tell you that 90's are a speed wheel. They're the starting point of speed wheels and are for going fast. They reside in the awkward position between the big boy wheels (100's, 110's) and the medium sized wheels (80's, 84's) and are often mistakingly considered medium sized and thus easier to skate in than larger ones. They are actually difficult to learn to do things in, even learning a proper and efficient stride, and on slight downhills your speed can get out of control quickly. They're for people with good skating skills and great braking ability that want to fly. If that's you, get them. If on the other hand you consider yourself someone who has a lot of learning to do then get medium sized wheels otherwise you'll struggle. As for me, I can handle the 90's well but I can't do the things I can do with my roller skates so I'm ready to downsize to 80mm so that I can learn more easily.
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