What we're about

Welcome to a free group for Stoicism in CT: Zenonians. Originally, the Stoics were called “Zenonians.” Stoicism was the dominant philosophy of life in Greece and Rome, spanning some 500 years. It remains relevant to life today.

The gesture of holding a clenched fist with the left hand was used by Zeno of Citium — the founder of Stoicism — to represent knowledge (Cicero, The Academics, 2.145); this gesture is the logo of our group.

“Zenonians” is open to the public, and no prior knowledge of Stoicism is required. A variety of events is offered, including seminars, literature reviews, practicums, and philosophical walks. This group is a wonderful way to connect with others interested in this philosophy of life, of living in accord with nature.

Welcome aboard.

Best,

Ron

Sponsored by https://www.StoicTherapy.com

Upcoming events (4)

According to Nature Walk

Woodtick Recreation Area

Welcome to one of our "According to Nature" Walk events, a philosophical walk for Stoics. As we walk along a trail, we will casually discuss a Stoic topic. What topics would you like to discuss? Any participation in a philosophical discussion is optional; nobody will be put on the spot and asked to participate if, instead, they prefer to listen. The main idea is to enjoy ourselves, nature, and hopefully be enriched by contemplating Stoicism. Location: Scoville Reservoir in Wolcott — Mill Pond Way (3.5 miles, gravel) Topic: “If to sail well is good and to sail badly is bad, then to sail is neither good nor bad. And if to live well is good, and to live badly is bad, then to live is neither good nor bad.” — Chrysippus. Why Philosophical Walks? There is a long history of association between philosophizing and walking. Aristotle’s school was called Peripatetic, which means “of walking” or “given to walking about.” He was known for walking and philosophizing until dark. Friedrich Nietzsche claimed to do his best thinking while walking alone in nature. Immanuel Kant walked alone as a means of escape. There are several official and unofficial philosophical walks around the world, such as the “Philosopher's Walk” in Toronto, Heidelberg, and Kyoto. Well, we're walking Stoics! Of course, philosophical walks have other practical benefits, such as connecting with nature, relieving stress, improving bloodflow, strengthening the heart, and burning calories. Example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nk2IaizL1e0 Difficulty "According to Nature" Walk events are limited to leisurely strolls or introductory hikes, so that neither the discussion nor the walk detracts from the other. The pace will be slow to moderate, with a goal that nobody is left behind. Weather Permitting Any "According to Nature" Walk event may be rescheduled due to rain or other weather conditions. Poll Please vote in a poll for where you would like to go for walks. https://www.meetup.com/Zenonians-Stoics-of-CT/polls/

Seminar: Katalepsis

Bristol Public Library

Welcome to one of our seminar events, which consists of the presentation of a topic in Stoicism. The topic of this seminar is: Katalepsis. Katalepsis means grasping, and is the criterion for knowledge in Stoic epistemology. We will present our interpretation of the method of katalepsis, the method of grasping knowledge from impressions; this method builds on the material in our previous seminar on Stoic definitions. This information is isn't just important, it is necessary for the practice of Stoicism, so that we can separate knowledge from mere opinion. We just "know" you're going to love it.

According to Nature Walk

Farmington Valley Greenway Parking

Welcome to one of our "According to Nature" Walk events, a philosophical walk for Stoics. As we walk along a trail, we will casually discuss a Stoic topic. What topics would you like to discuss? Any participation in a philosophical discussion is optional; nobody will be put on the spot and asked to participate if, instead, they prefer to listen. The main idea is to enjoy ourselves, nature, and hopefully be enriched by contemplating Stoicism. Location: Farmington Valley Greenway — Rail Trail (Southbound) Topic: “Zeno’s definition, then, is this: ‘A perturbation’ (which he calls a [Greek: pathos]) ‘is a commotion of the mind repugnant to reason, and against nature.’” — Zeno of Citium, cited by Cicero in Tusculan Disputations, 4.6. www.stoictherapy.com/resources-tusculan#book04chapter06 Latin: Est igitur Zenonis haec definitio, ut perturbatio sit, quod ‘pathos’ ille dicit, aversa a recta ratione contra naturam animi commotio. Note: Cicero translated ‘pathos’ as a perturbation. Why Philosophical Walks? There is a long history of association between philosophizing and walking. Aristotle’s school was called Peripatetic, which means “of walking” or “given to walking about.” He was known for walking and philosophizing until dark. Friedrich Nietzsche claimed to do his best thinking while walking alone in nature. Immanuel Kant walked alone as a means of escape. There are several official and unofficial philosophical walks around the world, such as the “Philosopher's Walk” in Toronto, Heidelberg, and Kyoto. Well, we're walking Stoics! Of course, philosophical walks have other practical benefits, such as connecting with nature, relieving stress, improving bloodflow, strengthening the heart, and burning calories. Example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nk2IaizL1e0 Difficulty "According to Nature" Walk events are limited to leisurely strolls or introductory hikes, so that neither the discussion nor the walk detracts from the other. The pace will be slow to moderate, with a goal that nobody is left behind. Weather Permitting Any "According to Nature" Walk event may be rescheduled due to rain or other weather conditions. Poll Please vote in a poll for where you would like to go for walks. https://www.meetup.com/Zenonians-Stoics-of-CT/polls/

Cosmic Perspective Night

Van Vleck Observatory

Join your fellow citizens of the cosmos at Van Vleck Observatory in Middletown during their monthly public viewing night. The Astronomical Society of Greater Hartford will be hosting this free event, which includes access to Wesleyan's 20 inch refracting telescope. Marcus Aurelius was especially fond of what's been called "physics as a spiritual exercise," a contemplation of the wider universe and our tiny place within it: "To watch the courses of the stars as if you revolved with them. To keep constantly in mind how the elements alter into one another. Thoughts like this wash off the mud of life below." (Meditations 7.47) Seneca was also a friend of the cosmic perspective: "For this body of ours is a weight upon the soul and its penance; as the load presses down the soul is crushed and is in bondage, unless philosophy has come to its assistance and has bid it take fresh courage by contemplating the cosmos, and has turned it from things earthly to things divine." (Letter 99) More details of what may be on view from the Astronomical Society: http://asgh.org/august-10-2019/ Things earthly: ...Parking details can be found here: http://asgh.org/public-observing/vvo-directions/ ...Weather permitting - Too much cloud cover and event will be cancelled by 6:30pm.

Past events (11)

Lit. Review: Epictetus' Discourses

Farmington Library

Photos (22)