• 3 Keys to Unlock the Power of Trust to Build the Perfect Agile Team

    Loyola U. Water Tower Campus Beane Hall (13th fl Lewis Towers): red line to Chicago/State or parking: http://bit.ly/wtcpark

    Join us as Danielle D. Pollard, Founder of 7 Wolves Consulting, talks about 3 Keys to Unlock the Power of Trust to Build the Perfect Agile Team. This is a joint meeting hosted by Chicago Chapter ACM / Loyola University Computer Science Department. 5:45 pm Doors open Refreshments provided 6:30 pm Presentation 7:30-7:45 pm Q&A 8:00 PM Closing We will return back to our regular location at Beane Hall, 13th floor on the Loyola Water Tower campus. Admission: Free, General Admission, open to the public 17 percent of large IT projects go so badly they can threaten the very existence of the company, according to a recent McKinsey & Associates study on large scale IT Projects. Even more terrifying is that 75% of business and IT teams believe their projects will fail right at the start before one requirement is gathered. With these kinds of statistics it’s no wonder why companies are scrambling to do things different. In today’s market the pressure to remain competitive and anticipate customer needs is felt way beyond the IT department. To dominate the competition you have to outwork or outthink them; many companies turn to Agile. Yet only about 50% of Agile projects are successful. What good is having better ideas if your time to market is dictated by disconnected & underperforming teams? In this highly energetic and interactive discussion participants will learn three proven strategies that create a culture that supports Agility including: - The #1 enemy that can derail any Agile workshop or transformation - Three key elements that will transform your current Agile transformation - A one question assessment to tell if your company promotes or prevents Agile ABOUT THE SPEAKER (DANIELLE POLLARD): With an Industrial and Systems engineering background and more than two decades of training, executive coaching, and most importantly, real-life, in-the-trenches leadership experience, Danielle believes that we are all connected and that success only happens with the cooperation of others. Danielle, referred to as “the transformer” for her innate ability to bring the best out in others to consistently drive results and deliver value. Founder of 7 Wolves Consulting, LLC. and author of the upcoming book “How to Succeed at Agile in a Waterfall World”, Pollard is passionate about making work fun and cultivating peak performance for teams and companies across the globe. . Danielle has delivered unprecedented bottom-line results as a project/program management consultant and Lean/Agile transformation coach for best in class companies within multiple industries including Transportation, eCommerce, and Banking. When she is not hard at work Danielle can be found serving her community by impacting the lives of hundreds of inner city youth and aspiring women entrepreneurs through her nonprofit performing arts and empowerment programs or serving long term clients as a personal barber. RSVP on this meetup or send an e-mail to [masked]

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  • The Origins of Silicon Valley: Why and How It Happened

    Engineering Research Facility (ERF), UIC

    Note: This meeting is an IEEE Vehicular Technology Society Chicago chapter meeting, of which the Chicago chapter of ACM is co-sponsoring along with IEEE Computer Society Chicago chapter, IEEE APS/MTT Chicago chapter, Stanford Historical Society and SAE Chicago chapter. 5:45 pm Doors open Food and drink provided and sponsored by: Stanford Historical Society and IEEE APS/MTT Chicago chapter 6:30 pm Introduction (Dr. Alvin Chin, Chair, IEEE VTS Chicago and Vice-Chair, ACM Chicago) 6:35 PM Talk by Paul Wesling (IEEE Life Fellow and Distinguished Lecturer) 7:30 PM Q&A 7:45 PM Concluding remarks Note location change: Room 1043 ERF UIC Engineering Research Facility 842 W Taylor St. Chicago, IL 60607 Admission: Free, General Admission, open to the public Please see this web page for public transit and driving/parking options: http://uic.edu/about/visit-directions The Halsted St Parking Structure is directly across S. Halsted Street from the Engineering Research Facility building, at the corner of Halsted and Taylor. After 3 PM, parking is $9 for the evening. Why did Silicon Valley come into being? The story goes back to local Hams (amateur radio operators) trying to break RCA's tube patents, “angel” investors, the sinking of the Titanic, Fred Terman and Stanford University, local invention of high-power tubes, WW II and radar, William Shockley's mother living in Palo Alto, and the SF Bay Area infrastructure that developed -- these factors pretty much determined that the semiconductor and IC industries would be located in the Santa Clara Valley, and that the Valley would remain the world’s innovation center as new technologies emerged -- computers, then software, mobile, biotech, Big Data, VR, and now autonomous vehicles -- and it would become the model for innovation worldwide. Paul Wesling, an IEEE Life Fellow and Distinguished Lecturer, has observed the Valley for decades as an engineer, executive, resident, and educator, and has presented this talk world-wide. He gives an exciting and colorful history of device technology development and innovation that began in Palo Alto, then spread across the Santa Clara Valley during and following World War II. You'll meet some of the colorful characters – Leonard Fuller, Lee De Forest, Bill Eitel, Charles Litton, Fred Terman, David Packard, Bill Hewlett, Russ Varian and others -- who came to define the worldwide electronics industries through their inventions and process development. You’ll understand some of the novel management approaches that have become the hallmarks of tech startups and high-tech firms, and the kinds of engineers/developers who thrive in this work environment. He’ll end by telling us about some current local organizations that keep alive the spirit of the Hams, the Homebrew Computer Club, and the other entrepreneurial groups where geeks gather to invent the future. As vice president of publications for the IEEE Electronics Packaging Society for 22 years, Paul supervised four archival journals and a newsletter. He received the IEEE’s Centennial Medal, the Board's Distinguished Service award, the Society Contribution Award, and the IEEE's Third Millennium Medal. RSVP is at http://bit.ly/vtschimay19 , not on this meetup. If you RSVP on this meetup and not on the website, you may not be guaranteed entry into the meetup.

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  • Intelligent Software Engineering: Synergy between AI and Software Engineering

    Join us as Tao Xie, Professor and Willett Faculty Scholar in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and ACM Distinguished Speaker, talks about Intelligent Software Engineering: Synergy between AI and Software Engineering. This is a joint meeting hosted by Chicago Chapter ACM / Loyola University Computer Science Department. 5:45 pm Doors open Food and drink provided and sponsored by: GOTO Chicago 2019 Conference APRIL 28 - MAY 2, 2019 https://gotochgo.com https://twitter.com/gotochgo 6:30 pm Presentation 7:40-8:00 pm Q&A Note location change: Loyola University Lake Shore Campus Cudahy Science Hall, Room 202 https://www.luc.edu/campus_reservations/cudahyscience.shtml Admission: Free, General Admission, open to the public As an example of exploiting the synergy between AI and software engineering, the field of intelligent software engineering has emerged with various advances in recent years. Such field broadly addresses issues on intelligent [software engineering] and [intelligence software] engineering. The former, intelligent [software engineering], focuses on instilling intelligence in approaches developed to address various software engineering tasks to accomplish high effectiveness and efficiency. The latter, [intelligence software] engineering, focuses on addressing various software engineering tasks for intelligence software, e.g., AI software. This talk will discuss recent research and future directions in the field of intelligent software engineering. Tao Xie is a Professor and Willett Faculty Scholar in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA. He received an NSF CAREER Award, a Microsoft Research Outstanding Collaborator Award, a Microsoft Research Software Engineering Innovation Foundation (SEIF) Award, a Google Faculty Research Award, a Facebook Testing and Verification Research Award, an IBM Jazz Innovation Award, and three-time IBM Faculty Awards. He served as the ISSTA 2015 Program Chair and the Tapia 2017/2018 Program/General Chair, and will serve as an ICSE 2021 Program Co-Chair. He was named an ACM Distinguished Scientist in 2015 and an IEEE Fellow in 2018. His homepage is at http://taoxie.cs.illinois.edu. RSVP on this meetup or send an e-mail to [masked] Campus Map: https://www.luc.edu/media/lucedu/pdfs-campusmaps/lsc.pdf Additional travel information: https://www.luc.edu/campustransportation/generalinformation/visitorsandguests/ Public transportation is a good option. The Loyola Red Line CTA L stop is right on Loyola Ave, and several buses serve the area.

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  • Bringing Hyperledger Fabric to the Enterprise

    Loyola University Water Tower Campus(Chicago/Michigan Area)

    5:45 pm (Social Hour, food and refreshments provided and sponsored by Oracle) 6:30 pm Presentation Bringing Hyperledger Fabric to the Enterprise Todd Little, Architect, Oracle Blockchain Platform Oracle released a managed Blockchain as a Service offering in July 2018. This session will cover the enhancements that Oracle has made to Fabric to simplify development and deployment of consortium style blockchains. These enhancements include providing management tooling to ease the burden of configuration and deployment, integration with Oracle's Identity Cloud Service (IDCS), performance and usability enhancements made to the state database including providing SQL based rich queries that can be safely used to query the ledger, as well as other enhancements such as a REST Proxy to provide REST interfaces to the blockchain. About the speaker: Todd Little has over 40 years of software architecture and software development experience in everything from microcode in hardware interfaces to enterprise software and middleware. He is particularly interested in distributed systems achieving high performance and availability. His modus operendi is to help organizations pragmatically introduce new technologies and processes into their enterprise solutions. He is not interested in cryptocurrencies, bitcoin, or especially ICOs. He would not look good in an orange jumpsuit. Todd is currently a member of the Hyperledger Privacy and Confidentiality Working Group, and the Hyperledger Performance and Scale Working Group. Prior to diving into blockchain, Todd was and still is the Chief Architect for the Oracle Tuxedo product family. While there will be light refreshments available, feel free to "brown bag" it and bring in food from the outside to eat during the social hour.

  • Trends and Applications of Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare

    Loyola University Water Tower Campus(Chicago/Michigan Area)

    5:45 pm (Social Hour, light refreshments) 6:30 pm Presentation Note: Due to travel, Plamen Petrov will not be able to speak, but we will have his colleague Mark Shapiro to speak in his absence. Abstract: The talk will cover trends and interesting applications of Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare. Physicians are the key group that determine how AI is adopted in medical practice, and as AI methods and technologies are rapidly moving from research labs to commercial implementations it is important to understand the perspective of physicians. Mark will provide a survey of views and expectations of physicians expressed in published literature over the last year and give examples of successful applications of AI technology in medicine. About the speaker: Mark Shapiro is Principal AI engineer at Anthem Inc. - one of the nation’s leading health benefits companies with over 73 million people served by its affiliated companies, including nearly 40 million within its family of health plans. Mark will play a critical leadership role contributing to the journey Anthem is on transforming healthcare with trusted and caring solutions giving members access to the care they need. Prior to joining Anthem, Mark worked as a data scientist at Deloitte and later at Kogentix, a machine learning startup recently acquired by Accenture. Mark has a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Illinois at Chicago. Prior to moving to the industry as a data scientist, for over ten years Mark conducted neuroscience research in neural control of human movement in healthy individuals and patients with movement disorders at UIC and Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago. While there will be light refreshments available, feel free to "brown bag" it and bring in food from the outside to eat during the social hour.

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  • Designing Distributed Systems with TLA+

    Loyola University Water Tower Campus(Chicago/Michigan Area)

    Join us for our last ACM Chicago meeting of 2018 as Hillel Wayne, Software Consultant, talks about designing distributed systems with the TLA+ specification system. 5:30-6:30 pm Networking 6:30-8:00 pm Presentation and Q&A 8:00-8:30 pm Networking Admission: Free, General Admission, open to the public Abstract: Distributed systems are hard. How do you test your system when it's spread across three services and four languages? Unit testing and type systems only take us so far. At some point, we need new tools. Enter TLA+. TLA+ is a specification language that describes your system and the properties you want. This makes it a fantastic complement to testing: not only can you check your code, you can check your design, too! TLA+ is especially effective for testing concurrency problems, like crashes, race conditions, and dropped messages. TLA+ is so effective for this that both AWS and Azure teams consider it essential to their work. It keeps subtle, serious bugs out of their code and helps them optimize without losing correctness. And it's not just for the cloud: engineers have used TLA+ to verify everything from business workflows to video games. This talk will introduce the ideas behind TLA+ and how it works, with a focus on practical examples and how you can apply it to your own work. Bio: Hillel is a software consultant in Chicago who specializes in formal methods. He is the author of Learn TLA+ (learntla.com) and Practical TLA+, is on the Alloy board, and teaches workshops on both of these languages. In his free time, he juggles and makes candy. He probably brought enough for everyone. RSVP on this meetup or send an e-mail to [masked].

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  • Automated Machine Learning Model Retraining Using AWS SageMaker

    Loyola University Water Tower Campus (Chicago/Michigan Area) Corboy Law Center (CLC) Room 0211

    Speaker: Stuart Takiar Jenkins Ph.D., Head of Business and Portfolio Forecasting, Enova International Title: Automated Machine Learning Model Retraining Using AWS SageMaker Abstract: Predictive models degrade over time for many reasons including variation in customers' preferences, competitors' behaviors, product changes and macroeconomic conditions. One way to mitigate model degradation is retraining at weekly and monthly frequencies. Stuart will describe how Enova International uses AWS SageMaker to automatically retrain machine learning models within an inexpensive, flexible and efficient framework. Agenda: 5:30-6:30 pm Networking 6:30 - 7:45 pm Presentation 7:45 -8:30 pm Networking Location: Loyola University Water Tower Campus Corboy Law Center 25 E Pearson St., Chicago, IL Room 211 Admission: Free, General Admission, open to the public Bio: Stuart earned his undergraduate degree at Stanford University, Ph.D. at Northwestern University and is currently an adjunct at Northwestern University. At Enova International, he manages two teams: one that builds machine learning models and a second that maintains infrastructure for automatically retraining machine learning models using AWS SageMaker. RSVP on this meetup or send an e-mail to [masked].

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  • Avoiding Privacy and Security Pitfalls in Analytics of Anonymized Data

    Join us as Dr. Mike Chapple, Academic Director for MS in Business Analytics, Notre Dame shares stories centered on privacy and security within analytics. Please note that the location will be hosted not at Loyola but at Strive Consulting. 5:30-6:00 pm Open forum. FOOD AND DRINKS will be provided. 6:00 - 7:15 pm Presentation 7:15 -8:00 pm Open forum Note location change: Strive Consulting 222 N. Lasalle St, Suite 200, Chicago, IL, 60601 Admission: Free, General Admission, open to the public Dr. Mike Chapple joins us at Strive Consulting to share stories centered on privacy and security within analytics. With a background as an intelligence officer at the NSA and currently the MS in Business Analytics academic director at Notre Dame, Dr. Chapple will provide insights into pitfalls of doing analytics that can violate privacy and security and how best to avoid these pitfalls. Accompanying these best practices are stories of how these violations can occur unintentionally, and how obfuscated data can be reversed. Dr. Chapple will also be providing a tour of analytics at ND and the programs he is involved in. Dr Chapple was previously the Chief Information Officer of the Brand Institute as well as formerly an active-duty intelligence officer in the US Air Force, where he worked in infosec research for the National Security Agency (NSA). He is a technical editor for Information Security Magazine and has written over a dozen books, including the CISSP Prep Guide (now in its sixth edition) and the Security+ Training Kit. Dr. Chapple has served as chair of the Common Solutions Group Cloud Strategy Working Group. He also serves as the chair of the EDUCAUSE Recognition Committee, Co-Chair of the EDUCAUSE Center for Applied Research Cloud Working Group, and a member of the EDUCAUSE Governance, Risk and Compliance Advisory Board. In 2014, he was selected as a Fellow of the Leading Change Institute. Dr. Chapple earned both his bachelor’s and doctoral degrees in computer science from the University of Notre Dame. He also holds a MS in computer science from the University of Idaho and an MBA from Auburn University. About Strive Consulting: Strive Consulting is a national business and technology firm helping industry-leading companies transform their organization by solving complex challenges through our deep expertise in Management Consulting, Technology Enablement and Data & Analytics. Our unique blend of strategic advisory, project delivery and staffing services, enables our clients to scale and grow. Founded in 2006, with offices across the U.S., Strive Consulting has continually been recognized as a great place to work. We’ve earned various accolades in all of our markets and we have been nationally named a Best Place to Work by Glassdoor. RSVP on this meetup or send an e-mail to [masked].

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  • Live Streaming in 2018: An Overview of Modern Streaming Workflows

    Loyola University Water Tower Campus(Chicago/Michigan Area)

    5:45 pm (Social Hour, light refreshments) 6:30 pm Presentation Drawing from experience streaming hundreds of events to millions of viewers around the globe, Nick Bacon will explain the entire live streaming workflow from signal acquisition through content distribution, with a comprehensive look at best practices for Facebook, YouTube, and Instagram. Nick Bacon is a Chicago-based video producer. Over the last decade, he has developed live video content for Fortune 500s, educational institutions, and the world's biggest media companies. Driven by an interest in real-time communication, he co-founded Mainstream Media in 2014. Mainstream Media crafts live digital experiences that engage, enrich, and activate global audiences. He is most likely to be found at the intersection of people, technology, and content creation. While there will be light refreshments available, feel free to "brown bag" it and bring in food from the outside to eat during the social hour.

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  • You Can't Do Data Science in a GUI w/ Hadley Wickham

    Crown Center Auditorium

    Join us as Hadley Wickham, Chief Scientist at RStudio, shares why you can't do data science in a GUI. This is a joint meeting hosted by Chicago Chapter ACM / Loyola University Computer Science Department. 5:45 pm Doors open 6:30 pm Presentation Note location Loyola University Lake Shore Campus Crown Center Auditorium[masked] W Loyola Ave, Chicago, IL 60626 (Campus Map Building #11) Admission: Free, General Admission, open to the public In this provocatively titled talk I'll attempt to convince you of the truth of four ideas central to my work: * Data science requires programming; a GUI does not provide the power necessary to tackle the creative challenges that data science requires. There are huge advantages to code, particularly when you see it as a medium of communication. * R is a terrific environment for writing data analysis code. It has some quirky features as a programming language, but many of the quirks are well tailored to the problems of data science. * Code should be primary artifact of any analysis, but you might generate the code in ways apart from typing it on a keyboard. Hadley Wickham is Chief Scientist at RStudio, a member of the R Foundation, and Adjunct Professor at Stanford University and the University of Auckland. He builds tools (both computational and cognitive) to make data science easier, faster, and more fun. His work includes packages for data science (the tidyverse: including ggplot2, dplyr, tidyr, purrr, and readr) and principled software development (roxygen2, testthat, devtools). He is also a writer, educator, and speaker promoting the use of R for data science. Learn more on his website, hadley.nz RSVP on this meetup or send an e-mail to [masked] Additional travel information: Loyola's web page about transportation: https://www.luc.edu/campustransportation/generalinformation/visitorsandguests/ Campus Map: (building #11) https://www.luc.edu/media/lucedu/pdfs-campusmaps/lsc.pdf The Crown Center Auditorium is at the east end of Loyola Avenue. Just before getting to the building, turn south down the driveway along the west side of the building. The main entrance is on the south side of the building, not directly on Loyola Ave. There will likely not be street parking in this area, you may use one of the two Loyola parking lots, cost is $7. Public transportation is a good option. The Loyola Red Line CTA L stop is right on Loyola Ave, and several buses serve the area.

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