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April 5, 2009 - 9 went

Alexandria PhotoWalk

Fairfax St. Down Spout

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Added by A former member
on Apr 5, 2009.
 

Comments

  • A former member

    As I mentioned to Earnest - I really like patinated (or naturally oxidized) metals. (Think of how sweet Richard Serra's core-10 sculptures look: the cadillac of "rust.") There were a couple of downspouts that caught a couple of our attention. This one did not look half as good in real life as it does here. Love that post-production.

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  • A former member

    Looks great, but I thought it had moved on toward surreal...glad you mentioned Richard Serra and COR-TEN steel. I've always like it myself. For anyone who doesn't know, COR-TEN is a variety of steel that rusts just enough to provide a protective coating, so it's self protecting.

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  • A former member

    Thanks for the posts and remarks Ern. Re "surreal," you think this treatment of the spout looks surreal? One of the liabilities/conceits of digital post is the extreme to which values and hues can be pushed. And in my case, when I see those beautiful chroma coming out, I hardly care if this is even recognizable to someone who might perhaps walk by that downspout every day, and imagine that they know it very well! One question esthetically speaking, is if the treatment looks completely removed from everyday sensual experience - like HDR for instance. (HDR looks surreal to me, but also, the more common it's employment, it looks gimmicky.) When I look at this, I kinda worry, but the artwork still seems fairly well located in a naturally observable optical experience - (though it may not be an objectively faithful rendering of a specific known object.) See you.

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  • A former member

    The color may be a little surreal, but I find it pleasing. Nice detail.

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  • A former member

    Hey. I'm not saying "surreal" is a bad thing. Art isn't about representing objects as much as it is about evoking emotions in the viewer.

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  • A former member

    Ernest: I gathered nothing from your remarks that suggested that "surreal" might be a "bad thing." (I am critically interested in the space between artistic intent and viewer comprehension, however!) I just thought I'd take you up on the theme of surrealism in photography. I do think there's a range in which a photo operates on us emotionally: between a "naturalistic" photojournalistic capture at one end of the spectrum, to effectively, a vision that has no regard for sustaining a grasp on objective physical reality (in composition or color) at the other end. I think substantial tweaking of color, as I've referred to, leads down that path (though fine art photography has long enjoyed this liberty while maintaining a distance from the transgressive and psychological aspects of surrealism). My opinion is that HDR really pushes this to a point of hyper/sur/realism/psychedelia, and I gather that the (unintended) result of jacking the colors up on the downspout, I elicited from you an esthetic experience that was at least off-center, and a bit toward that latter end of the spectrum. This is good for me to know, cuz I LOVES me some color, and I love the notion of heightened states of optical/visual awareness. It's a scientific fact that we all experience colors in remarkably subjective ways - imagine, there's a vast field of scientists at places like ISO that help us out in standardizing our definitions, etc. So what might be a gut-wrenching, mind-altering chroma shift for one person might simply be an "extra yellow" daisy to another. (We also have to be a little predisposed to having our psyches wrenched around a bit by art too!) Thanks for reading, and See you next week.

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  • A former member

    Here's a link on surrealism in photography from the Metropolitan Museum in NY: http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/phsr/hd_phsr.htm But I think it refers mainly to B&W photography within the earliest streams of early 20th C surrealism. If anyone is interested in taking up this theme as a creative challenge in their shooting/processing, that might be fun. I know for me, it's kinda accidental. I am less interested in pursuing the intellectual/esthetic "project" of surrealism, than in knowing when "normal" color imagery edges into that weird in-between space. I think by paying attention to this sort of thing we learn to control our art.

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