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The London Expat American Meetup Group Message Board › Bradley Manning, WikiLeaks and Afghanistan - US Citizen in Guantanamo

Bradley Manning, WikiLeaks and Afghanistan - US Citizen in Guantanamo

Wilber W.
WilberWebb
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 4,908
Bradley Manning Tells Court Public Have the Right to Know About US War Crimes
American Attorney for Julian Assange, Michael Ratner, reports he was in the courtroom and witnessed Manning speak with confidence and intelligence as he detailed the outrages that drove him to upload the documents to Wikileaks
http://therealnews.co...­



Con....

At the same time, he's then in, of course, correspondence of some sort with WikiLeaks. He doesn't know who's at the other end of the computer. He says at some point, maybe it's Julian Assange, maybe it's someone named Daniel Schmitt, who was the German guy who was at least with WikiLeaks for a while—Domscheit/Schmitt. He doesn't know who it is. He says, it might be other people in WikiLeaks' organization; I don't really know who I was communicating with; it's anonymous.

And then he also says during the course of this day that I was not pressured at all by anybody from WikiLeaks; this was a decision I made on my own.

So the first set of documents, you already see he's very politicized and thinking about people ought to see what the government is doing.

The next big event that happens is the "Collateral Murder" video. People are in his Iraq office, and they're discussing, you know, these videos and did it comply with the rules of engagement or not. And so he decides to go look at it himself. And he sees it, and he's really upset by it, 'cause first he sees what looks like you could argue was a mistake when the two Reuters journalists are killed from what he calls a—whatever it is, an aerial gunship. And then—and he says, well, they mistakenly shot them. And, of course, there's a dispute about whether that was a mistake or whether they should have killed those two Reuters people.

But then a van comes to try and rescue people, and the people in the helicopter fire on the van. And at that point, that's—he thinks that's just outside of the rules of engagement. These people were coming to rescue them. They had no weapons. And then he hears the bloodlust of the people in the helicopter—and that's the word he used, bloodlust. When they saw a guy crawling along the ground who apparently was wounded, they said in the helicopter, we hope he picks up a gun—essentially so they can shoot him.

And he gets very disturbed by this, very disturbed by the fact that it wasn't given to Reuters, even though Reuters asked for it on behalf of their dead journalists in their own organization and that the U.S. government or CENTCOM, the military, said they weren't even sure they had it. And there it was. So that's again him being upset by what he saw and doing something and acting on it. So that's the second thing he pleads guilty to is giving that video, again, uploading it to WikiLeaks. It turns out not to have even been classified, which is interesting. But he gives it to WikiLeaks.

The third incident is with the Iraq police. He's asked to help out with the Iraq police, the Baghdad police, help them identify, you know, insurgents or other things, I think, something like that. At some point, 15 people are turned over to the Iraq police. And he looks into what their case is. He's asked to do that. And the case against them was nothing but putting up posters about the corruption of the government in Iraq. He gets very upset by this because these people are treated badly. He's afraid they're going to be disappeared, and he's even afraid they're going to go to Guantanamo if they're turned back to the United States.

So what he does: he tries to report it to his commanders. They of course—they disregard it. And at that point, he again uploads that to WikiLeaks. WikiLeaks does not happen to publish that, but he continues, of course, talking to WikiLeaks about documents that—or at least about continuing to be in touch with WikiLeaks about documents. And that got him intrigued by something he'd been upset by for a while, which is Guantanamo.

What he said in court was, look it, [incompr.] have a right to interrogate people, sure, but Guantanamo really is morally questionable; what we're doing is keeping innocent people there and people who are very low-level, and Barack Obama promised to end it, and I think it just hurts the United States to keep it open. And that got him interested in finding what are called the detainee files, and those are files on each of the detainees in Guantanamo. And then he says when he talked—when he said to WikiLeaks, here's what I'm going to give you, and WikiLeaks says, well, what is it, and then WikiLeaks responded, well, they're old and they're not that political but they're important historically for Guantanamo, and they may help the lawyers as well. So then those get uploaded to WikiLeaks.

And then, of course, the last thing he talked about was the State Department cables. And there was an earlier State Department cable called the Reykjavik 13, which was actually the first document, I think, put up online by WikiLeaks. Reykjavik 13 he got off a website having to do with Iceland. And there was—Iceland during the financial crisis, there was huge pressure by the U.K. and the United States on Iceland to concede to all the bailouts and the austerity program, and Iceland refused. And this cable talked about the pressure that was being put on Iceland by the U.S. And he reacted, Bradley Manning reacted by saying, they're bullying Iceland, and I think this ought to get out; I don't think this kind of stuff should be secret.

And that got him, of course, into the diplomatic cables, which—he read every one on Iraq, he said, and he read them more broadly eventually, and he saw that basically they were hiding criminality and that he believes that that kind of diplomacy hurts the United States, secret diplomacy and that's not out in the public. And then that was the diplomatic cables that were released.

But what you see in each of these incidents is that in each one, he was affected by what he read or what he saw, and deeply affected, and he couldn't really do much with going up the chain of command. He couldn't do much with—what could he do with it? And he decided that the public, the U.S. people, and the world ought to know about it, because they ought to discuss it, and maybe that would change policy.
Wilber W.
WilberWebb
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 4,909
Bradley Manning Tells Court Public Have the Right to Know About US War Crimes
American Attorney for Julian Assange, Michael Ratner, reports he was in the courtroom and witnessed Manning speak with confidence and intelligence as he detailed the outrages that drove him to upload the documents to Wikileaks
http://therealnews.co...­



Con....

Now, there were a couple of other very interesting moments. There was a moment when he's back in Maryland about to want to releasing the Iraq and Afghan war logs, and he first tries to get them into another media, not WikiLeaks. He calls up The New York Times public editor and leaves a message on the public editor's website or answering machine, never gets a call back. He calls The Washington Post, and he said The Washington Post really didn't take him seriously. And so he felt that he couldn't do anything with The Washington Post or The New York Times. He said he was looking at some other places to do it. But in the end, because of what WikiLeaks had done in the past, he felt that would be the best way he could do it.

I guess for me sitting in the courtroom and seeing this young man, [incompr.] 22 years old, joined the military—20 years old, and at 22 started to upload documents to WikiLeaks because he was so disturbed, it made you realize what a hero Bradley Manning is. I mean, here he saw what the U.S. military was doing, what they were doing in Afghanistan, Iraq, Guantanamo, and what the State Department was doing, and he decided that I should do—that he should do something about it. And, unfortunately, he's going to pay a high price for it. The plea that he took, if—.

Let me just say how the pleas work here. This is not like a plea we see in a regular court. Normally you make a deal with the prosecutor. You go before the judge. There's a maximum sentence, or at least there's a plea to what might be a maximum sentence.

It's not the way this plea worked. This is what the judge referred to as a naked plea, which means he just decided to plead guilty to these nine specifications on his own with his lawyer and detailed what happened. They're not the highest charges. They're charges that cumulatively could give him 20 years. The problem is the prosecutor doesn't have to accept it and can go ahead and still prove the higher charges, using even elements of what Bradley Manning has pled to.

So that's going to be the important thing here. I think it's an important step. He's showing that he took responsibility for his actions. He gave an incredible, really, statement, moving statement about why he did it. And, hopefully, the judge will be moved, and, hopefully, his sentence will reflect what he actually pled guilty to and not the charges that can end up with a life imprisonment for Bradley Manning that the prosecutor wants to pile on. So it was an amazing day in court, Paul.

JAY: Now, he's been kind of depicted to some extent as sort of a weak person, sort of disturbed. What kind of man did you witness?

RATNER: You know, this is—the first time I saw it was when I went to Bradley Manning's hearing, where he actually got on the stand and testified about the abuse and torture that he underwent for almost a year between Iraq and Quantico. And at that point you realized this is not a weak, this is not a disturbed—this is something very different than that. This is a strong person, very intelligent. That came out in the hearing on the abuse, and it came out today.

First, he was obviously very intelligent. I mean, he was put into this high-level computer thing. When you heard him talk about computers, he just knows a heck of a lot.

But in addition, he's a strong person politically about what he thinks, about how he presents himself. He didn't have a weak voice. There was even a couple of funny moments in this very difficult day. At one point, the judge asked him a question, and he couldn't answer without revealing, he said, classified information. So everybody laughed about it, 'cause here he is now actually in the process, when he's asked a question, of protecting classified information from the judge's question. So everybody got a little bit of a laugh out of that.

But of course it's a tough day for Bradley Manning, that he's going to be sentenced to certainly a fairly long-term—hopefully not that long, and, hopefully, they'll accept these charges.

But what I sat there and realized is here you had a 22-year-old person who really acted on what he saw and his belief, and he's going to be someone who we can—.

As a last point here, the 35-page statement or whatever it was was not given to any of us. It was given to the judge, it was given to all these guys in camoflage and everybody else. We didn't get it. It's not because any of it was classified. I heard every word of it. It's because this court doesn't give materials out very readily. And we have lawsuits, the Center has a big lawsuit going on about this. We've gotten them to release a few things. But this document is so important, in my view, I think young people, old people reading this document will be moved to act themselves in a way that will try and make this country really adhere to the rule of law and stop being the killing machine that I think Bradley Manning saw that it was.

JAY: Alright. Thanks very much for joining us, Michael.

RATNER: Thank you, Paul.
Wilber W.
WilberWebb
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 4,910
Bradley Manning's long quest for justice
13 Dec 2012: Amy Goodman: History will judge harshly the US military's mistreatment of the alleged WikiLeaks whistleblower, who turns 25 this week
http://www.guardian.c...­
Wilber W.
WilberWebb
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 4,911
Why did Brad do it?
He wanted us all to know what warcrimes were being done in our name
http://www.alexaobrie...­

After these failed efforts (With The New York Times, Politico and The Washington Post) I had ultimately decided to submit the materials to the WLO. I was not sure if the WLO would actually publish these SigAct tables [missed a few words]. I was concerned that they might not be noticed by the American media. However, based upon what I read about the WLO through my research described above, this seemed to be the best medium for publishing this information to the world within my reach.

I believe and still believe that these tables are two of the most significant documents of our time.

But what you see in each of these incidents is that in each one, he was affected by what he read or what he saw, and deeply affected, and he couldn't really do much with going up the chain of command. He couldn't do much with—what could he do with it? And he decided that the public, the U.S. people, and the world ought to know about it, because they ought to discuss it, and maybe that would change policy.

Yesterday's compelling and articulate testimony by Bradley marked an important turning point for our efforts. Over the last 32 months, when he spoke of Bradley as a whistle-blower, it seemed like many simply didn't believe us... "How do know why he did it?" We no longer have to dance around the "accused whistle-blower," and can move on to "heroic whistle-blower" without reservation.

I'm order to prove "enemy of the state" the prosecution must prove collusion in whom he intended this information to be released.

I guess, in the US Militaries legal eyes the American people themselves are the enemy.

The stage is now set for the one of the most important and contested military court martials in history. Does the truth matter, or not?
Wilber W.
WilberWebb
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 4,913


Published on 1 Mar 2013

http://www.democracyn...­ - For the first time, 25-year-old U.S. Army Private Bradley Manning has admitted to being the source behind the largest leak of state secrets in U.S. history. More than a thousand days after he was arrested, Manning testified Thursday before a military court. He said he leaked the classified documents to the whistleblowing website WikiLeaks in order to show the American public the "true costs of war." Reading for more than an hour from a 35-page statement, Manning said: "I believed that if the general public, especially the American public, had access to the information ... this could spark a domestic debate on the role of the military and our foreign policy in general."
Wilber W.
WilberWebb
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 4,914


Manning - 1000 DAYS IN CUSTODY Melbourne -- Feb 22nd 2013
SONG - Bradley Manning by Graham Nash (of Crosby, Stills, Nash)
https://www.youtube.c...­
Wilber W.
WilberWebb
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 4,931
G
Wilber W.
WilberWebb
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 4,932
G
Wilber W.
WilberWebb
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 4,933
For them, it’s not about justice—it’s about victory and self-aggrandizement.
Bunnie Studios open letter; Why are courts no place for justice/ and how tough & moral is Bradley Manning?
http://www.nostarch.c...­


An open letter from bunnie, author of Hacking the Xbox:

Dear Reader,
No Starch Press and I have decided to release this free ebook version of Hacking the Xbox in honor of Aaron Swartz. As you read this book, I hope that you’ll be reminded of how important freedom is to the hacking community and that you’ll be inclined to support the causes that Aaron believed in.

Download Hacking the Xbox (PDF)
http://www.nostarch.c...­


Donate:
Demand Progress
GiveWell
Electronic Frontier Foundation

I agreed to release this book for free in part because Aaron’s treatment by MIT is not unfamiliar to me. In this book, you will find the story of when I was an MIT graduate student, extracting security keys from the original Microsoft Xbox. You’ll also read about the crushing disappointment of receiving a letter from MIT legal repudiating any association with my work, effectively leaving me on my own to face Microsoft.

The difference was that the faculty of my lab, the AI laboratory, were outraged by this treatment. They openly defied MIT legal and vowed to publish my work as an official “AI Lab Memo,” thereby granting me greater negotiating leverage with Microsoft. Microsoft, mindful of the potential backlash from the court of public opinion over suing a legitimate academic researcher, came to a civil understanding with me over the issue.

It saddens me that America’s so-called government for the people, by the people, and of the people has less compassion and enlightenment toward their fellow man than a corporation. Having been a party to subsequent legal bullying by other entities, I am all too familiar with how ugly and gut-wrenching a high-stakes lawsuit can be. Fortunately, the stakes in my cases were not as high, nor were my adversaries as formidable as Aaron’s, or I too might have succumbed to hopelessness and fear. A few years ago, I started rebuilding my life overseas, and I find a quantum of solace in the thought that my residence abroad makes it a little more difficult to be served.

While the US legal system strives for justice, the rules of the system create an asymmetric war that favors those with resources. By and far one of the most effective methods to force a conclusion, right or wrong, against a small player is to simply bleed them of resources and the will to fight through pre-trial antics. Your entire life feels like it is under an electron microscope, with every tiny blemish magnified into a pitched battle of motions, countermotions, discovery, subpoenas, and affidavits, and each action heaping tens of thousands of dollars onto your legal bill. Your friends, co-workers, employers, and family are drawn into this circus of humiliation as witnesses. Worse, you’re counseled not to speak candidly to anyone, lest they be summoned as a witness against you. Isolated and afraid, it eventually makes more sense to roll over and settle than to take the risk of losing on a technicality versus a better-funded adversary, regardless of the justice.

The US government is far and away the best-funded and fearsome enemy in the world, and copyright law has some unusually large, if not cruel, penalties associated with it. I never knew Aaron, but I feel that the magnitude of the bullying he was subjected to is reflected in his decision to end his life.

I echo Larry Lessig’s notion that the US legal system needs a sense of shame. To an outsider like me, it seems that certain prosecutors in the US government are obsessed with making a name for themselves at the expenses of the individuals they pursue. Winning cases gains them the recognition and credibility needed for promotions and assignments to ever higher profile cases. For them, it’s not about justice—it’s about victory and self-aggrandizement.

This system of incentives contributes to the shameless bullying of individuals and small entities who have the guts to stand up and do something daring. Individuals are robbed of the will and strength to fight for what they feel is right, as the mere act of prosecution can be as much a punishment as the verdict. As a result, I fear that the era of civil disobedience may be coming to a close.

As people, as individuals, as hackers, we need to oppose this trend and continue to do what we feel deep down in our hearts is right. While Aaron's story came to a tragic end, I hope that in this book you will find an encouraging story with a happy ending. Without the right to tinker and explore, we risk becoming enslaved by technology; and the more we exercise the right to hack, the harder it will be to take that right away.

bunnie
Singapore, March 2013
Wilber W.
WilberWebb
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 4,934
Côr Cochion Caerdydd - Not in my name
Have supported Brad by releasing this recording – proceeds to Bradley’s defence fund



Profits from the sale of this single will go towards the legal defence case of Welsh American ex soldier Bradley Manning, and thereafter to the international peace movement via CND Cymru. Bradley Manning was detained without trial for over two years and is now facing a lengthy legal defence case and potential lifetime imprisonment for his whistle blowing acts on war crimes committed by the American army in Iraq.

Blowing the whistle on war crimes is not a crime!

The single is also registered for Britain’s charts. You can also make a difference by lobbying your AM’s, MP’s and other political representatives to demand a stop to further illegal attacks and to call on those criminals guilty of war crimes to be impeached and brought to justice.

Go to http://www.tarwdu.com...­ to buy or buy directly from all good online stores.

Music by Gruff Meredith and Frank Naughton. Video by Leon Russell – contact him on cbayrday@gmail.com for video enquiries.


Published on 6 Dec 2012

Côr Cochion Caerdydd / Cardiff Reds Choir -- 'Not in my name'

Na i ryfel celwydd arall - Stop illegal wars being carried out in our name

Chorus: You're not doing it in my name You're not doing it in my name (x12)
http://www.corcochion...­
http://wiseupforbradl...­.
http://www.bradleyman...­
http://couragetoresis...­
http://www.tarwdu.com...­
http://www.stopwar.or...­
http://www.cndcymru.o...­
http://www.arrestblai...­
http://www.presstv.co...­
http://rt.com/on-air/...­
http://news.sky.com/...­
http://www.senedd.cyn...­.
http://www.parliament...­.
http://anniemachon.ch...­
http://www.voltairene...­
http://www.craigmurra...­
http://tarpley.net/...­
http://sovereignwales...­
http://www.youtube.co...­


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