An Opening Art Reception Double! Touchstone and Long View!

This is a past event

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This is rare that 2 of our favorite galleries in the city, Touchstone and Long View, have openings on the same night and are just a few blocks from each other. So we'll start out at Touchstone at 6 and then around 6:30 we will head over to Long View which is bigger and demands more time.

At Touchstone:
“GLIMPSES: NEW WATERCOLORS” BY PATRICIA WILLIAMS
“Glimpses” provides a tantalizing look inside the artist’s life. The vibrant watercolors take full advantage of the medium’s unique properties to breathe color and light into personal objects and rooms. The works are intimate, yet the viewer is kept at a distance by transparent washes and drips of color that partially obscure the images. The abstract quality of the drawing and application of paint raises the question of what is real, what is imagined and what is remembered.

“ON THE BRIGHT SIDE” BY PAMELA REYNOLDS
Color ---vivid, fluorescent color, unfettered and free, is the subject of Pamela Reynolds’ most recent series of abstract paintings. Contrasting bold linear pattern with freely-wrought drips, splatters and pours, these paintings were inspired by urban signage, graffiti, psychedelia, tropical textiles, and the inner workings of the artist’s own mind.

At Long View:
Rebecca Cole’s work currently focuses on the reinvention of entomological cataloging, display and the assemblage of shapes. Each shape is hand drawn and then intricately hand cut from carefully selected paper, focusing on recycling a medium that would otherwise be discarded and lost. She dissects small details of color, imagery and text into silhouettes that are then re-sculptured, pinned and encased. Rebecca’s aim is to transform an every day object into a piece of work that invites the viewer to see beyond its original source.

Amy Genser plays with paper and paint to explore her obsession with texture, pattern, and color. Evocative of natural forms and organic processes, her work is simultaneously irregular and ordered. She uses paper as pigment and constructs her pieces by layering, cutting, rolling, and combining paper.