• The Gang of Four design patterns - Ariel Valentin (doors open @ 6:30pm)
    The Gang of Four design patterns: which patterns are useful in Ruby, why and when? Ariel will provide a gentle introduction to “Design Patterns. Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software” a.k.a. “Gang Of Four Book” a.k.a. “GoF Book”. He will discuss how these patterns apply to programs written in Ruby using Russ Olsen’s “Design Patterns in Ruby” as well as share his own experience working with software that applied these design patterns. # About The Speaker Ariel Valentin is a professional programmer with 78 dog years of experience in the industry. He became test infected in 2004 and is and Extreme Programming advocate. Ariel’s was first introduced to Ruby in 2007 and has made many mistakes and over engineered solutions using Design Patterns​ in several different programming languages throughout his career. # Sponsors Location Sponsor: Capital Factory

    Capital Factory

    701 Brazos Street · Austin, TX

  • Building Command Line Interfaces with Ruby - Matt Buck (doors open @ 6:30pm)
    # Building Command Line Interfaces with Ruby Building a great CLI requires much of the same work as building a great GUI: the interface should be simple to understand and easy to use. Luckily for the modern Rubyist, there are a plethora of gems for building outstanding command line interfaces. Based on Voxable's work building Expando, a CLI for building natural language understanding models, we'll explore some of the considerations and options when building CLI's in Ruby. We'll also discuss under what circumstances Ruby might not be the best option (gasp!) and which alternatives to consider. # About the Speaker Matt has been programming computers since his parents first brought home an old Commodore 64 when he was ten years old. A graduate of the University of Texas, he's spent over a decade working with a number of high-profile engineering teams in the Austin area. In 2015, Matt launched Voxable, a conversational interface agency, with his fiancé. On a mission to help humans and computers better understand each other, he spends his time leading development efforts at Voxable, creating open source tools for building Conversational User Interfaces, and speaking about speaking to machines. # Sponsors Thank you to Capital Factory for sponsoring the space and to Toptal for sponsoring the food.

    Capital Factory

    701 Brazos Street · Austin, TX

  • Text Processing w. Ruby - Hal Fulton (doors open @ 6:30pm)
    Love it or hate it, we all do text processing sometimes. To do it well in Ruby, it helps to understand strings, arrays, regexes, I/O, and more topics. I'll remind you of things you forgot and teach you some new things as well. I'll end by presenting my project Livetext and showing its motivation and some of my own use cases. # About the Speaker Hal Fulton is the author of The Ruby Way, now in its third edition. He is working on a book Elixir for the Rubyist, to be released later in 2018. He has two degrees in computer science and more than 20 years in the industry, including a few years of teaching. His short stories have been rejected by some of the finest magazines in the country. On rare occasions he plays chess and piano, both incredibly badly. He spends his spare time putting Slinkys on escalators and passing counterfeit bills to tourists.

    Capital Factory

    701 Brazos Street · Austin, TX

    2 comments
  • Smalltalk Influences on OO - Sam Griffith (doors open @ 6:30pm)
    This month we’ll be having Sam Griffith give a talk on Smalltalk - Its History & Influence. The talk will cover the origins of Smalltalk, how it works, demos, and how it influenced Ruby, Clojure and other systems and languages supporting OO, polymorphism and interactive development approaches. This talk will be a joint meetup between Austin Clojure & AustinRB! # About the speaker Sam Griffith is a Mentor, Architect and Developer who’s been programming since 1981 and in OO since 1986. Worked professionally In Smalltalk for Sprint, Nortel, DSC, American Express, Booz Allen & Hamilton and JP Morgan. He wrote software for the NeXT Machine in 1988, including a X11R4 server and client in Objective-C, Spoke to Fannie Mae about their NeXTStep systems and the other to Java EE and many other adventures including iOS, Android and even work on Software Defined Radio for John’s Hopkins Applied Physics Lab. He likes to learn new tech and loves sharing the history of computers and computer languages.

    Capital Factory

    701 Brazos Street · Austin, TX

  • Cucumber (Intro to BDD + new syntax) - Youssef Chaker (doors open @ 6:30pm)
    Cucumber has a new syntax, so we will take this opportunity to revisit what Behavior Driven Development (BDD) is, how to write Cucumber scenarios in Ruby, and discuss how the new syntax might make it easier to new developers to adopt Cucumber. ## Speaker Youssef is the bear in Bear & Giraffe, an Austin software development agency focused on helping startups make the right technical decisions. He's been working with Ruby and Cucumber for over a decade. He is also the organizer of AustinRB and co-organizer of Austin on Rails.

    Capital Factory

    701 Brazos Street · Austin, TX

  • Is Elixir the Next Ruby? - Hal Fulton (doors open @ 6:30pm)
    About the talk: Ruby is still my favorite language, but it’s not the only language in the world. Lately I have been getting into Elixir, which is partly inspired by Ruby (both the syntax and the community). It’s been an important addition to my mental toolbox, and I think it’s going to be bigger in the future. Hal Fulton is the author of The Ruby Way, now in its third edition. He is working on a book Elixir for the Rubyist, to be released later in 2018. He has two degrees in computer science and more than 20 years in the industry, including a few years of teaching. His short stories have been rejected by some of the finest magazines in the country. On rare occasions he plays chess and piano, both incredibly badly. He spends his spare time putting Slinkys on escalators and passing counterfeit bills to tourists.

    Capital Factory

    701 Brazos Street · Austin, TX

  • Ethics in Tech - Natasha Robarge (doors open @ 6:30pm)
    # Why It's Important to Think About Ethics in Tech - Natasha Robarge In the tech field, we don't really have many conversations about ethics. We usually don't think about the edge cases that could happen when we code or develop a product. Sometimes, thinking about some edge cases that could happen and makes all the difference. # Speaker Bio Natasha a coding bootcamp graduate from General Assembly and soon to be ACC undergraduate. She got into tech at age 16, and was determined to go to Hack Reactor. Until she switched paths after taking prep courses at Hack Reactor. Natasha is currently a Junior React / React Native developer gaining as much experience as possible.

    Capital Factory

    701 Brazos Street · Austin, TX

    3 comments
  • Amazon Lambda: A Sidekick to Sidekiq - Alex Levine (doors open @ 6:30pm)
    Talk Blurb: A success story of using Lambda with Rails to perform time sensitive jobs at scale for ticketing Austin Trail of Lights. About the speaker: Alex is the Lead Engineer at Ticketbud, a self-service ticketing provider in Austin. Alex is a Rubyist who was in the first cohort of Austin's original developer bootcamp MakerSquare in 2013.

    Capital Factory

    701 Brazos Street · Austin, TX

    2 comments
  • Metaprogramming Magic + Jekyll-Indieweb and Friends (doors open 6:30PM)
    The last meetup of the year, and your last chance to get your Ruby fix before the holidays. Metaprogramming Magic - Amanda Chang Metaprogramming is "writing code that writes code" – but what does that mean? In this talk, we’ll use metaprogramming techniques to reimplement some common Ruby tools and then look at how we can use metaprogramming to design libraries in Ruby. Amanda is a full-stack developer at RigUp, a software platform for the oil & gas industry. She’s a proud graduate of the Flatiron School in New York and a supporter of coding bootcamps. Outside of work, you’ll find her playing ultimate frisbee or doing improv at the Hideout Theatre. But she would never bring comedy into her technical talk. Ruby is serious business, y’all. Jekyll-Indieweb and Friends - Tom Brown Jekyll is a simple blogging platform written in ruby. Indieweb is a people-focused alternative to the "corporate web" which makes it possible to talk to each other online even when we're on different sites and platforms. In this talk, Tom will describe how to use the jekyll-indieweb project and how the pieces like micropub, webmention and indieauth fit together to allow common social tasks like favorites and replying to posts. We'll also look at projects that are compatible with jekyll like micro.blog. We can continue the conversation at Indiewebcamp Austin the weekend of Dec. 9-10. Tom Brown is an open source software developer interested in digital identity, and he often attends Internet Identity Workshop and more recently IndiewebCamps. Tom has added open standards related to identity to several popular software projects. He can be found online as herestomwiththeweather. Thank you to Capital Factory for sponsoring the space and Tom Brown for sponsoring food.

    Capital Factory

    701 Brazos Street · Austin, TX

    3 comments
  • Horror Story Time
    We all have our own horror stories, whether related to installing gems like nokogiri, failed deployments, or staying up all night to fix a bug and realize we forgot to add a "return" statement (I'm looking at you Javascript). So come join us and share your horror/war stories over some 🌮 . Think of it as a group therapy 🙃. All stories are welcome, even if not directly related to Ruby. They could be dev ops stories, management stories, diversity stories, interview stories, etc.

    Capital Factory

    701 Brazos Street · Austin, TX