Past Meetup

February Bay Area Computer Music Technology Meetup @ Cogswell

This Meetup is past

16 people went

Details

Our Feb 7th Bay Area Computer Music Technology meetup will run from 7:30-9:30pm and will be hosted by Cogswell Polytechnical College @ 1175 Bordeaux Drive Sunnyvale, CA 94089.

Our presentations this month will be:
- Scot Gresham-Lancaster on the Hub and computer network music
- Mark Holler and Scot Gresham-Lancaster on ETAAN (Electronicaly Trainable Analog Neural Net)
- Robert Hamilton (http://ccrma.stanford... (http://ccrma.stanford.edu/~rob/)) will present on using the Quake 3 engine as an audio controller using Q3osc http://cm-wiki.stanfo... (http://cm-wiki.stanford.edu/wiki/Q3osc)
- A lightning talk by you? (5 minute presentation - come with your laptop)

Scot Gresham-Lancaster will be presenting on his long term association with the HUB (http://hub.artifact.c... (http://hub.artifact.com)) and the particulars of "onstage network performance". The HUB continues a stream of music originating in the 1970's, starting with the League of Automatic Music Composers and leading through 3 phases of technological change:
1. Pull - sharing a common memory over RS-232 serial
2. Push - trading interconnected midi messages
3. Networked - using OSC and UDP packets

Scot will discuss telematic network performance over the internet and his ongoing collaboration with Pauline Oliveros over the last 25 years, starting with "Echoes from the Moon" and culminating with a contribution to the recent "Soundwire" performance between CCRMA, iEAR, and UCSD last December.

Mark Holler and Scot Gresham-Lancaster will present on ETAAN (Electronically Trainable Analog Neural Net) chip that Mark Holler lead the team at Intel designing in the 1980's as well as the Music Box I and 2 for the David Tudor and the Merce Cuningham Dance Company. They will discuss current efforts to make the rarest and most obscure synthesizer on earth accessible to everyone in the world with a broadband internet connection. They will discus how this system will be integrated in Cellphonia: Tempo Variabile, (in memorium John Cage and David Tudor ) a cellphone "opera" that will be presented for Harvestworks in NY, NY in April and at the Teatro Italia in Naples in June.

Robert Hamilton will present on using the Quake 3 engine as an audio controller using the Q3osc from Stanford CCRMA http://cm-wiki.stanfo... (http://cm-wiki.stanford.edu/wiki/Q3osc). Q3osc is a full "oscpack" osc implementation compiled into the ioquake open-source Quake 3 engine with a set of game-engine mods to allow for some interesting new controls and tracking for in-game weapon projectiles.

Many thanks to Scot and Cogswell Polytechnical College for hosting us this month.

All the best,
Noah Thorp
Bay Area Computer Music Technology Group Organizer

BIOS
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SCOT GRESHAM-LANCASTER
Scot Gresham-Lancaster (b. Redwood City, CA USA 1954) is a composer, performer, instrument builder and educator with over three decades of professional experience. He is dedicated to research and performance using the expanding capabilities of computer networks to create new environments for musical and cross discipline expression. As a member of the HUB, he is one of the early pioneers of "computer network" music which uses the behavior of interconnected music machines to create innovative ways for performers and computers to interact. He has recently performed in a series of "co-located" performances collaborating in real time with live and distant dancers, video artists and musicians in network based performances. For over two decades, he has worked with multimedia prototyping and user interface theory and its relationship to new markets as an independent consultant and at Interval Research, SEGA-USA, and Muse Communications.

ROB HAMILTON
http://ccrma.stanford... (http://ccrma.stanford.edu/~rob/)
Composer and researcher Rob Hamilton (b.1973) is actively engaged in the composition of contemporary electroacoustic musics as well as the development of interactive musical systems for performance and composition. Currently a Ph.D. candidate at Stanford's CCRMA, Rob holds degrees from Stanford University, Dartmouth College, and the Peabody Institute of The Johns Hopkins University with additional studies at Le Centre de Création Musicale de Iannis Xenakis (CCMIX) and L'Ecole Normale de Musique de Paris with the EAMA. His most recent work is focused on the use of multi-user virtual game-environments to drive interactive and communal musical systems.