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New Meetup: July's Book Club - You pick the book

From: Torrie
Sent on: Tuesday, May 18, 2010 3:50 PM
Announcing a new Meetup for One Drink Minimum Book Club of Princeton!

What: July's Book Club - You pick the book

When: Wednesday, July 7,[masked]:00 PM

Price: $1.00 per person

Where:
Tre Bar
120 Rockingham Row
Princeton, NJ 08540

Hi everyone. Thank you for all of your great suggestions for July's "Patriotic" book selection. I still can't decide, so I am leaving it up to you.

I have created a poll asking which of the following three books you would like to read. I will leave the poll open until May 31st, at which time I will announce the winner and open up the RSVP for July.

Thanks for your help and Happy Reading!

#1 The Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl by Timothy Egan
On April 14, 1935, the biggest dust storm on record descended over five states, from the Dakotas to Amarillo, Texas. People standing a few feet apart could not see each other; if they touched, they risked being knocked over by the static electricity that the dust created in the air. The Dust Bowl was the product of reckless, market-driven farming that had so abused the land that, when dry weather came, the wind lifted up millions of acres of topsoil and whipped it around in "black blizzards," which blew as far east as New York. This ecological disaster rapidly disfigured whole communities. Egan's portraits of the families who stayed behind are sobering and far less familiar than those of the "exodusters" who staggered out of the High Plains. He tells of towns depopulated to this day, a mother who watched her baby die of "dust pneumonia," and farmers who gathered tumbleweed as food for their cattle and, eventually, for their children.

#2 One Thousand White Women: The Journals of May Dodd by Jim Fergus
An American western with a most unusual twist, this is an imaginative fictional account of the participation of May Dodd and others in the controversial "Brides for Indians" program, a clandestine U.S. government^-sponsored program intended to instruct "savages" in the ways of civilization and to assimilate the Indians into white culture through the offspring of these unions. May's personal journals, loaded with humor and intelligent reflection, describe the adventures of some very colorful white brides (including one black one), their marriages to Cheyenne warriors, and the natural abundance of life on the prairie before the final press of the white man's civilization. Fergus is gifted in his ability to portray the perceptions and emotions of women. He writes with tremendous insight and sensitivity about the individual community and the political and religious issues of the time, many of which are still relevant today. This book is artistically rendered with meticulous attention to small details that bring to life the daily concerns of a group of hardy souls at a pivotal time in U.S. history.

#3 When Everything Changed: The Amazing Journey of American Women from 1960 to the Present by Gail Collins
You've come a long way, baby: that's Collins's conclusion about American women, who once lacked the right to publicly wear pants and now take their place on the presidential campaign trail and the battlefield. New York Times columnist Collins attempts a comprehensive account of the last 50 years of women's history in this sequel to America's Women, primarily focusing on the 1960s. Giving relatively short shrift to the current generation of young women, Collins centers the bulk of her attention on the baby boom generation (to which she belongs) and leaders like NOW founder Betty Friedan and Gloria Steinem, as well as dozens of ordinary struggling women. The book's stronger parts include highlighting pioneers like Congresswoman Martha Griffiths, who began her political career in the 1940s and stories of laughably shortsighted sexism against Sandra Day O'Connor.

Learn more here:
http://bookclub.meetup.com/1505/calendar/13522557/

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