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About the April Poll Books

From: Calvin R.
Sent on: Friday, March 13, 2009 8:55 AM
The only let me put so much information in a Poll Question so her is a recap of the 5 books that you can vote on for April at the site.

The Moviegoer by Walker Percy-arguably one of the top 5 novels of the 2cd half of the 20th century. It won a National Book Award in 1962. Time magazine included the novel in its TIME 100 Best English-language Novels from 1923 to 2005.[1]

The Moviegoer tells the story of Binx Bolling, a young stockbroker in post-war New Orleans. The decline of southern traditions, the problems of his family and his traumatic experiences in the Korean War have left him alienated from his own life. He daydreams constantly, has trouble engaging in lasting relationships, and finds more meaning and immediacy in movies and books than in his own routine life. 250is pages

Downtown Owl by Chuck Kosterman. Somewhere in North Dakota, there is a town called Owl that isn't there. Disco is over, but punk never happened. They don't have cable. They don't really have pop culture, unless you count grain prices and alcoholism. People work hard and then they die. They hate the government and impregnate teenage girls. But that's not nearly as awful as it sounds; in fact, sometimes it's perfect. 280ish pages

The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman. In The Graveyard Book, Neil Gaiman has created a charming allegory of childhood. Although the book opens with a scary scene--a family is stabbed to death by "a man named Jack? --the story quickly moves into more child-friendly storytelling. 320ish pages

Enger's Game by Orson Scott Card. In order to develop a secure defense against a hostile alien race's next attack, government agencies breed child geniuses and train them as soldiers. A brilliant young boy, Andrew "Ender" Wiggin lives with his kind but distant parents, his sadistic brother Peter, and the person he loves more than anyone else, his sister Valentine. Peter and Valentine were candidates for the soldier-training program but didn't make the cut--young Ender is the Wiggin drafted to the orbiting Battle School for rigorous military training. 340ish pages

Left Hand of Darkness by Ursala K Le Guin. If there were a canon of classic science fiction, The Left Hand of Darkness would be included without debate. Certainly, no science fiction bookshelf may be said to be complete without it. But the real question: is it fun to read? It is science fiction of an earlier time, a time that has not worn particularly well in the genre. The Left Hand of Darkness was a groundbreaking book in 1969, a time when, like the rest of the arts, science fiction was awakening to new dimensions in both society and literature. But the first excursions out of the pulp tradition are sometimes difficult to reread with much enjoyment. Rereading The Left Hand of Darkness, decades after its publication, one feels that those who chose it for the Hugo and Nebula awards were right to do so, for it truly does stand out as one of the great books of that era. It is immensely rich in timeless wisdom and insight. 320ish pages.a ne{o}lit book cluba ne{o}lit book cluba ne{o}lit book club

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