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The Battleship Potemkin-Capital Theatre/Reddstone

Award-winning composer Andrew Alden is bringing his diverse ensemble of percussion, guitars, strings, piano, sound effects, samplers, and synthesizers, Rejuvenating silent film classics with live music, the Andrew Alden Ensemble brings an exciting new score to the infamous Battleship Potemkin

Director Sergei Eisenstein was commissioned by the Soviet government to make the film as commemoration of the uprising of 1905. Eisenstein's narrative focused mainly on the crew of the battleship Potemkin who were fed up with the extreme cruelties of their officers and their maggot-ridden meat rations and therefore staged a violent mutiny.

The new score by the Andrew Alden Ensemble brings new life to this revered film through the influence of classical chamber music and the distinct edge of rock. The movie will be played silent (with intertitles) while the textural score transforms the picture with refreshing new sounds and combinations that have never been heard before.


8:00 MOVIE Capitol Theatre 1290 W 65th Street in the Detroit Shoreway                                                                                     \                                                               Parking: Large Free Parking Lot to the Right of the Theatre

9:45 EATS/DISCUSSION ReddStone

The the right amount of small plates http://www.reddstonecleveland.com/reddstonecleveland/Menu.html For a nice bite to eat before you head home on a school night.

SYNOPSIS     

Eisenstein wrote the film as a revolutionary propaganda film, but also used it to test his theories of "montage". The revolutionary Soviet filmmakers of the Kuleshov school of filmmaking were experimenting with the effect of film editing on audiences, and Eisenstein attempted to edit the film in such a way as to produce the greatest emotional response, so that the viewer would feel sympathy for the rebellious sailors of the Battleship Potemkin and hatred for their cruel overlords. In the manner of most propaganda, the characterization is simple, so that the audience could clearly see with whom they should sympathize.

Eisenstein's experiment was a mixed success; he "was disappointed when Potemkin failed to attract masses of viewers", but the film was also released in a number of international venues, where audiences responded more positively. In both the Soviet Union and overseas, the film shocked audiences, but not so much for its political statements as for its use of violence, which was considered graphic by the standards of the time. The film's potential to influence political thought through emotional response was noted by Nazi propaganda minister Joseph Goebbels, who called Potemkin "a marvelous film without equal in the cinema ... anyone who had no firm political conviction could become a Bolshevik after seeing the film". The film was not banned in Nazi Germany, although Himmler issued a directive prohibiting SS members from attending screenings, as he deemed the movie inappropriate for the troops.                                                                          

Battleship Potemkin has received extremely positive reviews from critics. Since its release, Battleship Potemkin has often been cited as one of the finest propaganda films ever made and considered amongst the greatest films of all time. The film was named the greatest film of all time at the Brussels World's Fair in 1958. Similarly, in 1952, Sight & Sound magazine cited The Battleship Potemkin as the fourth greatest film of all time and has been voted within the top ten in the magazine's five subsequent decennial polls, dropping to number 11 in the 2012 poll.                         


FIRST TIME MOVIEGOERS  

Visit the First Time Moviegoers page .

FEE 
The $5.00 yearly fee (or $1.50 for one movie) goes toward charges incurred for using the MeetUp website. You can access PayPal or pay your fee to the Organizer at the event. 




 

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