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PLEASE NOTE: DATE AND LOCATION CHANGE

Let's meet up and watch the meteor shower together!

[A permit for the Lexington Reservoir would cost $100 plus $70 per hour for a ranger to be onsite. Therefore, I have scrapped that location.]

Instead, we will meet Saturday evening at the following location:

Perseid Meteor Shower Viewing
Calero Reservoir, 8:30pm-11:30pm

MAP TO COME THIS WEEK . . .

• We will meet at the Whole Foods parking lot, corner of Almaden Expressway and Blossom Hill Road at 8:30 pm. We will wait there for 20 minutes, so don't be late if you want to travel with the group. Look for balloons where the group will be waiting.

• We'll then proceed to watch the meteor showers at the reservoir parking lot. Again, look for balloons where the group will be gathered. I will bring light sticks for the kiddies.

• Cell phone coverage is spotty in the area so I highly recommend you meet us beforehand or bring a GPS.

• Bring a flashlight with red lens or cellophane cover.

• Bring lawn chairs, blankets, telescopes, cameras and binoculaurs

• Well-behaved children welcome - no pets!

• Since the county has approved this location, there will be other people there as well.

Google map of the Reservoir and surround area, click here (https://maps.google.com/maps?q=calero+reservoir&ie=UTF-8&hq=&hnear=0x808e2512b3bcfd4f:0x6ed16efb2e170e06,Calero+Reservoir&gl=us&ei=V97xUeOyE8rArQHlr4GIDg&ved=0CKIBELYD).

I will post detailed directions after this weekend, when I do a dry run to the location.

The County has approved this location, so I won't be changing it anymore!!! (phew)

August 10: The Perseids

Almost every skywatcher knows about the Perseid meteor shower, because it offers up to 60 an hour under pleasant summer skies. Showtime usually begins as soon as the radiant (near the Double Cluster in Perseus) clears the horizon, an hour or so before midnight, and it climbs higher in the sky throughout the night. This should be a great year for the Perseids, because a fat crescent Moon should be setting just when the shower is revving up. The Perseids' parent comet is 109P/Swift-Tuttle, and the story of how 19th-century observers realized this shower is an annual event (http://www.skyandtelescope.com/observing/objects/meteors/3304116.html) is interesting reading.

http://www.almanac.com/content/meteor-showers-guide