• Full Moon, Planets and the Stars

    Diamond Valley Minature Railway

    Good morning everyone! With the upper atmosphere looking like it’ll be steady we could be in for a fantastic evening for viewing fine details on Jupiter and Saturn along with the moon. I’m going to have my big planetary telescope setup for anyone that wants to get close up and personal with the moon and planets! We can still swing around and view some of the lovely star clusters scattered throughout the sky. With a full moon there won’t be any galaxy spotting but the view of Jupiter and Saturn alone will be breathtaking. $10 per adult (kids free) Come down and join me for the evening with my planetary telescope! Cheers, Colin

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  • (Cancelled) Friday Night Viewing and phone photography

    Diamond Valley Minature Railway

    $10.00

    Hello Everyone, Over the last three nights the ABC has been running Stargazing Live and the weather in Melbourne has been pretty horrible. Friday night however, the skies are going to clear and we are going to have a chance to look at the skies above us. So, what are we going to look at? Well, early on in the night we'll be able to see the Moon and Jupiter. Later on Saturn will pop up higher and even though Mars will rise a few hours later, it isn't likely to be visible above the tree line until after most of us are in bed asleep. With the position of the moon I was thinking that it could be a good opportunity for people to do some high resolution moon photography with their phones. We will also be able to look at some really interesting objects around the southern parts of the skies such as NGC 3372, various open clusters and the largest globular cluster in the skies! Hoping you can make it down and view the skies with me. Cheers, Colin

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  • Capturing the Light of the Universe

    Swinburne University ATC 101-Advanced Technology Center.

    Capturing the light of the Universe Light is the key piece of the Astrophysics we make today. Thanks to the analysis of the light astronomers know where stars, galaxies are, what they are made of, how they move, and more. I will give some examples of how light is captured and analysed in big telescopes such as the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) of the Australian Astronomical Observatory (AAO), from imaging to spectroscopy, summarising some of its most important scientific results. But I will also talk about how amateur astronomers and citizen scientists are now capturing the light of the Universe, as they are getting astonishing views of the night sky. Deep sky images of both professional and amateur astronomers are inspiring artists and young people in science and technology around the world. Presenter: Dr Angel Lopez-Sanchez, Australian Astronomical Observatory and Macquarie University Date: Friday 27 April 2018 Time: 6.30pm - 7.30pm (doors open at 6.30pm in this instance) Venue: Swinburne University, ATC building, ATC101 (enter from Burwood Road) Map: http://www.swinburne.edu.au/media/swinburneeduau/about-swinburne/docs/pdfs/hawthorn-map.pdf

  • Pre-Easter Star Gazing

    Diamond Valley Minature Railway

    $10.00

    Hello everyone! Between my busy schedule and the skies not being clear on the right nights, this is going to be the first star gazing night I’ve organised for 2018. Thursday looks to be an excellent evening for it too! We’ve got the Large Magellanic Cloud to the south, the moon to the north, Great Orion Nebula to the west and eventually Jupiter rising to the East. I’ll be setting up what is close to a very large set of binoculars for comfortable viewing. When entering Eltham Lower Park turn left at the roundabout and follow the parking lot until you come to a deadend. That’s where I’ll be parked. $10 for adults, kids free. Hope to see ya’ll there! Regards, Colin

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  • The Light Fantastic - Astronomy Lecture

    Swinburne University AMDC301

    The Light Fantastic: So much of what we know about the universe has travelled to us on a beam of light. We can’t travel to a star and pull one apart to see how it works. Instead, astronomers use light and the stories it tells to piece together our understanding of the universe. Presenter: Dr Tanya Hill, Museums Victoria Date: 8 December 2017 Time: 6.30pm - 7.30pm Venue: Swinburne University, AMDC building, AMDC301 (enter from Burwood Road)

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  • Saturday Night Star Gazing

    Eltham Lower Park, Main Rd

    $10.00

    Hello everyone! Well another clear night is upon us Saturday night, by another I mean it is one of half a handful that have happened in the past four months! I've got a new telescope that I'll be bringing out on the night, one that has been built specifically as longer focal length visual instrument. We'll be able to start the night and periodically go back to one of the most interesting planets, Saturn. Want to see it rings? Well, they're very easy to see! We'll spend a fair bit of time looking into the heart of the Milky Way which is littered with open clusters and various kinda of emission nebula like the Lagoon and Triffid and the Pillars of Creation in the Eagle Nebula. As the night rolls on we'll swing around to the southern part of the skies where there are some very large globular clusters and the two closest galaxies to us, the Magellanic Clouds. So, come join me this Saturday night and let's go looking to the stars :D Cheers, Colin

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  • Friday Night Star (Moon & Planet) Gazing

    Eltham Lower Park, Main Rd

    $10.00

    Hello everyone! Been a while since we've been able to get out and view the stars above due to the late winter weather. But, with what looks like to be another clear night looming, it's time to get out again. So, I have a new telescope that I've barely used so far, it needs some love! It is smaller and more compact that my previous one but the views should be even better than before. This time you'll be able to view through two eye pieces at once! It is considerably more comfortable to view when you're looking through two rather than just a single eye piece having to squint. We'll be getting some high powered views of Jupiter, Saturn and the Moon. We'll seen open and globular clusters, single and double stars. The skies are out oyster. So, hopefully you can make it to view through my new Takahashi! Regards, Colin

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  • Swinburne Lecture: How to read Earth history from rocks

    Location visible to members

  • Friday Night Star Gazing

    Eltham Lower Park, Main Rd

    Hello everyone, Having been watching the weather recently Friday night has been changing from clear to cloudy one day to the next. At this stag, it is going to be clear again with hopefully very good seeing conditions, fantastic for planetary views. So, we should spend some time looking at both Jupiter and Saturn! Both of them will be visible with great views. The moon is not going to come up above the horizon until 11:30 PM so we will have a chance to spot some of the brighter galaxies in the sky. Get a view of Centaurus A* radio galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud. There are open clusters like the Jewel Box around the southern part of the sky. There is a multitude of open clusters within the Sagittarius constellation, the middle of the galaxy. So, come one come all. Bring warm clothing as it'll likely get chilly as the evening goes on. Hope to see you there! Cheers, Colin

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  • Swinburne Astronomy Lecture: Galaxies and their Sizes

    Location visible to members

    Small, Medium, Large: What Galaxy Sizes Reveal About Their Past Galaxies are the largest structures of matter in our Universe. Our own Milky Way has been studied in glorious detail. We know it has billions of stars, around most of which planets are likely to be found. There is a super massive black hole at its center where anything that gets too close will be consumed. There are intricate dust lanes that obscure the main disk of the galaxy. There is the life-force of stars, hydrogen gas. Finally, there is the mysterious dark matter that acts as a gravitational glue holding the ordinary matter together. But our galaxy is just one of many, and since their discovery, understanding how these complex objects form and evolve has been a focus of astronomers. There are many pathways to reveal more about the nature and evolution of galaxies. In my talk, I will share how I use the sizes of galaxies to understand more about their growth.

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