• What can Antifragility do for Microservices?

    Jan de Vries joins us to talk about antifragility and microservices. ** Thank-you to PageUp for hosting this event ** ** Level 5, 91 William Street ** In this talk Jan de Vries will explain the different aspects of antifragility. Although Nassim Nicholas Taleb, the author of Antifragile (published in 2012), never mentioned any IT example, antifragility is everywhere within IT. Antifragile means that a system or an organisation has the ability to become stronger when subjected to volatility, shocks, stressors and errors either from your own system/organisation or other systems/organisations. In other words, what does not kill your system/organisation will make it stronger or antifragile. But most systems are designed to deal with known risks only and IT departments invest heavily in avoiding failures. What if you would design systems that expect all parts of the system to fail? And force random failure to validate resilience. The Chaos Monkey, designed by Netflix, is one of the best examples in this area. What does this mean for microservices? To move from fragile to antifragile software you should not only apply chaos engineering, but also continuous deployment, canary releases, A/B-testing, auto scaling, focus on MTTR instead of MTBF and so on. The underlying force in all cases is antifragility. It is also important to get rid of software projects, organisational debt, technical debt, silo’s, hand-offs between teams, politics, fear and ego. The underlying force in all cases: again antifragility. What would all these mean for a microservice architecture? This talk will help you to better understand the hidden connections. Jan de Vries is looking forward to combine your MSA expertise with his antifragile expertise. Bio: Jan de Vries is a senior trainer, business IT consultant and public speaker in the fields of Business Information Management, DevOps, Scaled Agile and Antifragility. He is convenor of the Enterprise DevOps group that conducts research on large scale deployment of DevOps in organisations. He founded Blue Ocean Recon to facilitate the development of Blue Oceans and Lean Startups.

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  • Kafka, Streams and Microservices

    Iress

    Venue: Thanks to IRESS for hosting us this month. They are on Level 19 at 385 Bourke Street. Speaker: Hans Jespersen, VP of Worldwide Systems Engineering at Confluent will join us for a discussion about Kafka, Streams and Microservices. Hans Jespersen is the Vice President of Worldwide Systems Engineering at Confluent where he helps organisations get maximum value from Apache Kafka and the Confluent platform. Before coming to Confluent, Hans worked as the Vice President of systems engineering at Solace Systems as well as the CTO of Integration and Web Services at TIBCO, spending many years contributing to the success of companies around the world. Hans brings 25 years of experience in helping a large variety of companies in their deployment of large scale mission critical infrastructure. Given Hans’ background he helps to bridge the gap between the traditional world of SOA, ESBs, and APIs and the Realtime Event Streaming world of Confluent & Kafka today. He is also the author of the Confluent Whitepaper, “Comparing Confluent Platform with Traditional Messaging Middleware”.

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  • Microservices Adoption Antipatterns

    NAB

    Thanks to NAB for hosting this meetup. It will be located at "The Hall" on Level 3 at 700 Bourke Street. As you come in the main entrance, head up the escalators and turn right. Note that we are heavily oversubscribed so if your plans change please update your RSVP to give a chance to our waitlist. We're really excited to welcome back Chris Richardson for our January Microservices Meetup. Talk Title: Microservices adoption anti-patterns: Obstacles to decomposing for testability and deployability A typical mission-critical enterprise application is a large, complex monolith developed by large team. The velocity of software delivery is usually slow, and the team struggles to keep up with the demands of the business. Consequently, many enterprise applications are good candidates to be migrated to the microservice architecture. As you might expect, migrating to microservices requires an enterprise to tackle numerous technology-related challenges. But enterprises often encounter obstacles that have less to do with technology and more to do with strategy, process, and organization. In this talk I describe the essential characteristics of the microservice architecture.You will learn about its benefits and its drawbacks. I describe several anti-patterns of microservices adoption that I've observed while working with clients around the world. You’ll learn the challenges that enterprises often face and how to overcome them as well as how to avoid the potholes when escaping monolithic hell. Bio: Richardson is a developer and architect. He is a Java Champion, a JavaOne rock star and the author of POJOs in Action, which describes how to build enterprise Java applications with frameworks such as Spring and Hibernate. Chris was also the founder of the original CloudFoundry.com, an early Java PaaS for Amazon EC2.

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  • Microservices - Merry Xmas Edition

    Google Melbourne office

    Happy end of year...let's get together for a final Microservices Meetup for 2018. We'll have a two speakers including a special guest from the US as well as pizza and refreshments...further details to be announced soon. Talk 1: Arvind Prabhakar - Emerging Trends in Data Microservices Carving out monolithic applications into microservices architectures has an impact on how data is managed and dealt with across the enterprise. Must the data model reflect the granularity of the microservices you are building? What about security and privacy concerns for the associated data? And if these were not significant issues on their own, consider what you must do with the operational data like logs, clickstreams and metrics produced by individual services. Join this talk to learn about how modern enterprises are dealing with such challenges to get the most out of their microservices investments. Arvind Prabhakar is Co-founder of StreamSets, Inc., in 2014 and has been its Chief Technology Officer since June 2014. Mr. Prabhakar was Engineering Leader at Cloudera. He serves as a Director of StreamSets, Inc. He holds MS in Computer Engineering from Santa Clara University and B. Tech in Aerospace Engineering from Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay. Talk 2: James Liu - Istio and observing microservices James Liu is a Customer Engineer in Google Cloud. James works with Google Cloud’s customers in Australia, helping them on the path to innovation and transformation using cloud technologies. Prior to joining Google, James comes from a consulting background having spent 10 years working on technology transformation programs across government, healthcare, logistics and other enterprises. Thank you to Google who will be hosting us this month.

  • Architecture Patterns: Microservice Meetup #19

    We're very pleased to once again host international speaker, author and microservices guru Chris Richardson. Title: Managing data consistency in a microservice architecture using Sagas Abstract: The services in a microservice architecture must be loosely coupled and so cannot share database tables. What’s more, two phase commit (a.k.a. a distributed transaction) is not a viable option for modern applications. Consequently, a microservices application must use the Saga pattern, which maintains data consistency using a series of local transactions. In this presentation, you will learn how sagas work and how they differ from traditional transactions. We describe how to use sagas to develop business logic in a microservices application. You will learn effective techniques for orchestrating sagas and how to use messaging for reliability. We will describe the design of a saga framework for Java and show a sample application. Bio: Chris Richardson is a developer and architect. He is the author of POJOs in Action, which describes how to build enterprise Java applications with frameworks such as Spring and Hibernate. Chris was also the founder of the original CloudFoundry.com, an early Java PaaS for Amazon EC2. Today, he is a recognized thought leader in microservices. Chris is the creator of http://microservices.io (http://microservices.io/), a website describing how to develop and deploy microservices. He provides microservices consulting and training and is working on his third startup http://eventuate.io (http://eventuate.io/), an application platform for developing microservices.

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  • The Back to School Microservices Meetup

    Deloitte

    Once again this January we are extremely happy to be hosting international speaker, author and microservices guru Chris Richardson. Title: Developing microservices with aggregates Abstract: The Domain Model pattern is a great way to develop complex business logic. Unfortunately, a typical domain model is a tangled, birds nest of classes. It can’t be decomposed into microservices. Moreover, business logic often relies on ACID transactions to maintain consistency. Fortunately, there is a solution to this problem: aggregates. An aggregate is an often overlooked modeling concept from the must read book Domain Driven Design. In this talk you will learn how aggregates enable you to develop business logic for the modern world of microservices and NoSQL. We will describe how to use aggregates to design modular business logic that can be partitioned into microservices. You will learn how aggregates enable you to use eventual consistency instead of ACID. Bio: Chris Richardson is a developer and architect. He is the author of POJOs in Action, which describes how to build enterprise Java applications with frameworks such as Spring and Hibernate. Chris was also the founder of the original CloudFoundry.com, an early Java PaaS for Amazon EC2. Today, he is a recognized thought leader in microservices. Chris is the creator of http://microservices.io (http://microservices.io/), a website describing how to develop and deploy microservices. He provides microservices consulting and training and is working on his third startup http://eventuate.io (http://eventuate.io/), an application platform for developing microservices.

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  • Pre-Christmas Microservices Meetup

    Collective Campus

    This will be our last meetup before Christmas some come along for some beer, pizza and great conversation. James Buckett: Kubernetes on Raspberry Pi James Buckett from the Kubernetes User Group is coming to give a talk and demo showing Kubernetes running on Raspberry Pi. James will cover the hardware, software and run a demo showing pod (nginx container) fail over if power is pulled from one of the nodes (Pi's). Tim Moore: Reactive Microservices with Lagom Description: Everyone is trying to build microservices these days, but a lot of teams are struggling with implementation, or worse, with keeping them up in production. Part of the problem comes when developers think that building microservices is just like building a monolith—only smaller. Writing and running microservices successfully requires a shift in mindset and a very different architecture than traditional monoliths: one based on reactive principles of responsiveness, resilience, elasticity, and asynchronous message passing. Learn about what these principles mean to application developers, and why Lightbend created Lagom to help guide the way. Bio: Tim Moore is a new developer of the Lagom framework at Lightbend, having just joined at the beginning of October. He loves working on development platforms that handle the hard stuff so you can focus on the needs of you application. Prior to working at Lightbend, Tim has worked in a variety of roles at companies such as Culture Amp, Lonely Planet, Atlassian and Salesforce.com. He has occasionally been accused of being a Grumpy Cat impersonator.

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  • Post-Hiatus Microservices Meetup #18

    Deloitte Melbourne

    Mark your calendars for the return of Melbourne microservices meetup. Talk Title: Getting started with particle.io Abstract: A look at the particle.io IoT technology and the power of their cloud service. We’ll build an IoT device, connect it to the Internet and wire it into powerful cloud services. Bradley: Bradley Clayton is an architect in the Mobile and Connected Devices (MCD) team in Deloitte Consulting’s Digital practice. He loves playing with Maker technology, including IoT devices, 3D printers, and enabling cloud services. Bradley has built mobile applications for a number of Australian organisations, including the National Bank of Australia, Belong, Australia Post, Telstra, ANZ, GE Money and the Department of Health.

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  • Microservices Meetup #17

    Carsales.com.au

    We're very happy that carsales.com.au will be hosting us this month at their Richmond headquarters. Continuing the serverless theme we have: Hery Hope: "Serverless Realtime Analysis" Erwin van der Koogh: "Look Ma! No Servers!"

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  • Microservices Meetup #16

    Collective Campus

    Thanks to Collective Campus for hosting us this month. We have Ronald Holshausen talking about Pact and testing with Consumer Driven Contracts. I'm also calling for anyone who wants to give a 10 minute lightening talk to let me know as we'll have some time before Ronald's main talk. Ronald Holshausen: Deploy with Confidence! Making your micro-services pay nicely together with Consumer Driven Contracts. Ronald Holshausen is a passionate technologist who enjoys tackling complex problems using state of the art software engineering practices. He is a core contributor to Pact family of consumer-driven contract testing frameworks and the Pact Foundation.

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