Past Meetup

State Park Mushroom Foray Saturday 13 July 2013

This Meetup is past

3 people went

Location visible to members

Details

Join us for a hunt for wild mushrooms! Newbies welcome, you can learn as you go from seasoned foragers and professional mycologists.

This foray needs a leader. You don't need to know the area or be an expert, you just need to count heads and make sure no one is left behind in the woods. If you're interested contact Foray Coordinator Nessie Van Loan ([masked]) or find him at the next meeting.

Note that IMA forays happen rain or shine. Bring a bag for litter removal and something to protect yourself against ticks and mosquitoes.

IMA foray locations are not posted publicly. Please see the newsletter for directions. If you do not have a copy of the newsletter, make sure you have paid your membership dues. http://www.illinoismyco.org/join

We now have a page for arranging carpools to IMA events:
http://ima.erideshare.com/

The password is ima. It is a new system, so let us know how you like it. Please remember to offer to pay for gas.

State Park Foray
Saturday 13 July 2013, 09:00AM
Leader: NEEDED
Collecting Purpose: Any*
Chicago, IL
Nearest Transit: CTA #30 bus or Hegewisch Metra

*Our permit for the Cook County land in does not allow collecting for the pot, but our permit for the state land at allows collection for any purpose. Bring a sack lunch and bug spray.

In this area an affiliate of Polish descent found 'kozia broda' and 'podpienki' mushrooms.
KOZIA BRODA (goat's beard) is a false name for Grifola frondosa (hen-of-the-woods/maitake) it doesn't not look like a goats beard, but rather more like the horned head of a ram, hence some call it "SHEEP HEAD" But ever since some Polish old timer misnamed it and it stuck! The goats beard would be better served if it was called "KWOKA LESNA" which means "hen-of-the-woods" in English. The name "PODPIENKI" means in SLOVIC languages POD=under, PIEN=stump, PIENKI=stumps; so that it describes Honey mushrooms by the location where most of them grow- at the feet of dead/dying trees (oaks) or stumps! {thanks to John Komosa for this explanation}