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Italian film on tv tonight

From: Jeanette
Sent on: Monday, June 18, 2012 8:22 AM
TCM, cable channels 58 or 59, check your local listings, will be showing Fellini's "Nights of Cabiria" tonight, Monday, at 7 pm.  Since your brain may be used to speaking and listening to Italian on the first Monday night of the month, this could be an extra opportunity for a Monday practice.....(-:

From Wikipedia:

Nights of Cabiria (Italian: Le notti di Cabiria) is a 1957 Italian romantic drama film directed by Federico Fellini and starring Giulietta Masina, François Périer, and Amedeo Nazzari. Based on a story by Fellini, the film is about a waifish prostitute who wanders the streets of Rome looking for true love but finds only heartbreak.[1] In 1998 the film was rereleased, newly restored and with a crucial scene that censors had cut.[2]

The name Cabiria is borrowed from the 1914 Italian film Cabiria, while the character of Cabiria herself is taken from a brief scene in Fellini's earlier film The White Sheik. It was Masina's performance in that earlier film that inspired Fellini to make this film.[3] But no one in Italy was willing to finance a film which featured prostitutes as heroines. Finally, Dino de Laurentiis agreed to put up the money. Fellini based some of the characters on a real prostitute whom he had met while filming Il Bidone. For authenticity, he had Pier Paolo Pasolini, known for his familiarity with Rome's criminal underworld, help with the dialogue.[4]

The American musical and movie Sweet Charity is based on Fellini's screenplay.[5]

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