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April poll is up

From: Julie
Sent on: Wednesday, January 18, 2012 10:04 PM

Hi all,

 

I've posted the April poll.  Please go vote on what we should read.  The options are

http://www.meetup.com/lesbianlit-117/polls/455452/

 

  • "The Creamsickle" by Rhiannon Argo

 This novel is more about queer family–creating it and maintaining it–than about individual relationships, and the house plays a Mansfield Park-like role in the story.

 

  • "Slammerkin" by Emma Donahue

Born to rough cloth in working-class London in 1748, Mary Saunders hungers for linen and lace. Her lust for a shiny red ribbon leads her to a life of prostitution at a young age, where she encounters a freedom unknown to virtuous young women. But a dangerous misstep sends her fleeing to Monmouth and the refuge of the middle-class household of Mrs. Jones, to become the seamstress her mother always expected her to be and to live the ordinary life of an ordinary girl. Although Mary becomes a close confidante of Mrs. Jones, her desire for a better life leads her back to prostitution. She remains true only to the three rules she learned on the streets of London: Never give up your liberty; Clothes make the woman; Clothes are the greatest lie ever told. In the end, it is clothes, their splendor and their deception, that lead Mary to disaster.


  • "The Reluctant Daughter" by Leslie Newman

After years of hoping to attain her mother’s love and acceptance while struggling to live a true and honest life, Lydia eventually acknowledges her mother will never really see her. When Doris develops a life-threatening illness, Lydia is forced to make a life-and-death decision of her own: should she make one final attempt to heal her relationship with her mother or simply let her go?

  • "Zippermouth" by Laurie Weeks

In this extraordinary debut novel, Laurie Weeks captures the freedom and longing of life on the edge in New York City. Ranting letters to Judy Davis and Sylvia Plath, an unrequited fixation on a straight best friend, exalted nightclub epiphanies, devastating morning-after hangovers—ZIPPER MOUTH chronicles the exuberance and mortification of a junkie, and transcends the chaos of everyday life.

 

Please vote!  

http://www.meetup.com/lesbianlit-117/polls/455452/

 

Julie

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