• Science and spirituality
    Stoicism, Buddhism & Out of Body Experiences: A full day of talks exploring the complex harmonies of science & spirituality ____________________________________________________________________________________________ **Please note: this is a ticketed event. RSVP on meetup will not get access on the day.** For tickets, please click here - get a 10% discount with the code LPC http://bit.ly/lpc-sept ____________________________________________________________________________________________ Have you ever felt you went beyond your ordinary self and felt connected to something bigger than you? In a 2016 UK survey, over 84% of respondents (including atheists, agnostics, Christians, and Buddhists) said yes to this question. So what’s going on? In this series of talks, we’ll explore the science and psychology of spirituality. We’ll put spiritual ideas to the test of psychological research, and discuss whether science really can offer solutions to some of life’s greatest mysteries. You’ll learn: - The surprising links between the ancient philosophies of Buddhism and Stoicism, and modern psychotherapy (with Jules Evans, author and co-organizer of London Philosophy Club) - The complex harmonies of science and spirituality; how they complement each other and relate to the key transitional challenges that define our era (with Dr Oliver Robinson, lecturer at Greenwich University) - The amazing science of out-of-body experiences; whether anything really does leave the body during OBEs, and the profound effects this has on our sense of 'Self' (with Dr Susan Blackmore, author and respected expert on consciousness) This is an event for anyone who suspects, that in our rapid drive towards secularisation, we might be leaving something valuable behind. For information on the lectures, speakers, and tickets, please see: http://bit.ly/lpc-sept **Please note: this is a ticketed event. RSVP on meetup will not get access on the day.. For a 10% discount use the code LPC

    birkbeck University of London

    Malet Street, Bloomsbury · WC1E 7HX London

    8 comments
  • Jung, Existentialism & The Science of Meaning
    A full day of talks exploring how psychology can help you uncover a sense of purpose and meaning in life. ____________________________________________________________________________________________ **Please note: this is a ticketed event. RSVP on meetup will not get access on the day. Tickets are £40 for the day or £20 for students. Use the code LPC for 10% off** http://bit.ly/lpc-july ____________________________________________________________________________________________ What would you rather have: a happy life or a meaningful life? In surveys, most people list happiness as their top value, and self-help books and life coaches make up part of a multibillion-dollar industry. But should happiness really be the only goal that motivates us? Recent research has found that the pursuit of happiness alone can negatively affect our well-being, and people who highly value it report feeling lonelier on a daily basis. By contrast, a growing body of evidence is indicating that the pursuit of meaning leads to a deeper and more lasting form of well-being. Indeed, participants in a study who had pursued meaning said they felt more “enriched,” “inspired,” and “part of something greater than myself.” They also reported fewer negative moods. But how do you build meaning? In this series of talks, we’ll explore the science and psychology of meaning. We’ll discuss evidence-based ways human beings build meaningful, purposeful and fulfilling lives. You’ll learn: - How existential psychology can help you uncover your own sense of purpose - Professor Mick Cooper, PhD - Carl Jung’s Search for Meaning, individuation and how Jungian psychology can help you grow as an individual, become more authentic and create a life of purpose - Gary Lachman - How to use the latest scientific research to overcome ‘capitalist life syndrome’ and live a meaningful life in an era of scepticism and continuous stress from the economic ratrace - Dr Joel Vos, PhD You’ll leave with a clear understanding of how these ideas can help you create more meaning and purpose in your own life, and also how to help others do the same. For information on the lectures & speakers, and tickets, please see: http://bit.ly/lpc-july **Please note: this is a ticketed event. RSVP on meetup will not get access on the day.*

    birkbeck University of London

    Malet Street, Bloomsbury · WC1E 7HX London

    9 comments
  • A Day on Human Potential
    Learn how to become the best version of you in this full day of talks on the science, psychology and philosophy of human potential. To buy your ticket, go to this link: http://bit.ly/lpc-potential A full day pass costs £40, or £20 for students. Use the code LPC for a 10% discount Do you have free will? Or are you simply a product of your culture? Can you consciously change your personality? Or is it set in stone from a young age? Why are life crises (quarter, mid and late) so common in modern society? And how can you use them as a catalyst for personal growth? These are just some of the questions we’ll be exploring at this upcoming Day on Potential at The Weekend University, in partnership with the London Philosophy Club. In this series of talks, we’ll explore the science, psychology, and philosophy of human potential. We’ll discuss evidence-based ways human beings transform, grow and develop over time, and how you can use these insights to realise more of your potential in this lifetime. You’ll learn: – The truth about free will. Do you actually have it? Or are you simply a product of your culture? – The surprising link between life crises (quarter, mid & late) and personal growth – The science of personality change. Can you consciously change your personality? Or is it set in stone from a young age? You’ll leave with a clear understanding of how these ideas can help you become a better version of you, and also how to bring out the best in those around you. Format The format will be similar to a TED event, but with in-depth lectures and focused on the science, psychology and philosophy of human potential. 10:00am – 12:00pm: Session 1 12:00 – 1:00pm: Lunch break 1:00pm – 3:00pm: Session 2 3:00pm – 3:15pm: Afternoon break 3:15pm – 5:00pm: Session 3 Lectures & Speakers The Science of Personality Change – Dr Christian Jarrett, PhD, editor of British Psychology Society Research Digest Your personality is the set of basic traits that makes you you, influencing your habits of thought and behaviour. But how fixed are they? The great American psychologist William James said that our personality is set like plaster by age 30. But new findings show that while there is a degree of stability in our traits, we also continue to change in meaningful ways through our lives – our personalities are more like plastic than plaster. Crisis & The Release of Human Potential – Dr Oliver Robinson, Greenwich University In a nationwide survey, participants were asked to evaluate whether their life was in a major crisis. 22% said yes, 33% said maybe, and 45% said no. So why is crisis so prevalent in adult life? Does it have a function, or are humans just inherently fragile? In this talk, Dr Oliver Robinson explores how crises can help you unlock new potential that would otherwise remain dormant, that they have a clear function in acting as a stimulus for seeking new information, making positive changes, and making new (sometimes hard) discoveries about ourselves and the reality around us. Free Will & Human Potential– philosopher Julian Baggini Do you have free will? Or are you simply a product of your culture? How much responsibility should you take for your actions? Are your neural pathways fixed early on by a mixture of nature and nurture, or is the possibility of comprehensive, intentional psychological change always open? What role does your brain play in the construction of free will, and how much scientific evidence is there for the existence of it? Once again, you need to book your ticket through this link: http://bit.ly/lpc-potential Get 10% off through the code LPC

    birkbeck University of London

    Malet Street, Bloomsbury · WC1E 7HX London

    3 comments
  • Spiritual awakenings, and how to integrate them
    As more and more Westerners meditate, take psychedelics or pursue other spiritual practices, the number of those reporting mystical experiences has risen from 20% in 1960 to around 50% today. Some of those experiences may be unsettling - ecstatic experiences, after all, are moments when you go beyond the ordinary ego and feel a connection to something more powerful than you. And that can upset the applecart of your customary reality. It's important, therefore, that western culture learns to be more open and friendly to these experiences when they arise, and to see them as a gift and opportunity for deep change, even when they're scary and involve things way outside your customary reference, like visions, voices or spirits. That also means the attitude of psychiatrists, to advance them from their history of antipathy to spiritual experiences, and to help them recognize that, sometimes, psychosis-like experiences are not a biomedical pathology, but an opening to greater maturity and wisdom. Come to this unique event to hear from four excellent speakers, who will share their personal stories and insights as healers: Anthony Fidler, Tai-Chi teacher, on how he used mindfulness and connection practices to navigate through a turbulent spiritual awakening a decade ago. Louisa Tomlinson, poet and Integral Somatic Therapist, who will speak about her own awakening and how it informs her work as a healer. Anna Beckmann, psychotherapist and film-maker, who will share her experience and insights. and Dr Tim Read, psychiatrist and member of the RCP's group on psychiatry and spirituality, who will tell us where the psychiatry profession in the UK is at the moment on this topic. It will be presented by me, Jules Evans, author of The Art of Losing Control, who will talk a bit about the cultural history of ecstatic experiences in the West, and his own experience of spiritual turbulence after an ayahuasca retreat. Tickets are £10, to cover costs of venue-hire. We have some spaces available for those on incapacity benefits or facing economic hardship - please get in touch if you'd like one of these, at [masked] Get tickets here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/spiritual-emergence-emergencies-and-how-to-navigate-them-tickets-45235821560 I've been organizing LPC events for a decade in London, and this one feels particularly important and interesting. I hope you can join us. PS: The topic will be explored from a variety of perspectives, from materialist to Jungian to Buddhist to shamanic (it's in a church but obviously the perspective won't be exclusively or even mainly Christian).

    St Mary Aldermary Church Cafe

    Watling Street, London EC4M 9BW · London

    9 comments
  • London Philosophy Club Reading Group
    Being dismissed – the politics of emotional expression ‘Bitterness, sentimentality, and emotionality are terms of interpretive dismissal. They contrast interestingly to inarticulateness, a term more often applied to certain groups of men than to women. (Sue Campbell) What role does the public expression of feelings have? And under what circumstances and by whom is the expression of emotions deemed legitimate or, to use Sue Campbell’s term, ‘dismissed’ as demonstrating an ‘unhealthy’ emotional life? The reading this time looks at a 1994 – but very timely – paper by Sue Campbell (a Canadian philosopher who died in 2011) that sets out to examine how the terms used to describe the anger of people confronting discrimination and oppression can be used to dismiss these emotions, and exclude them from the public sphere. The file is in the Dropbox at: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/zm9k35njado4mks/AABvs9jl4_RvAPvKv_BBxq2xa?dl=0 Look forward to seeing you!

    Hoop and Grapes

    80 Farringdon Street EC4A 4BL · City of London

    2 comments
  • What does it mean to be a strong man in the modern world?
    • What we'll do This is a joint event between the London Philosophy Club and Rebel Wisdom. Four great speakers. Tickets are £10. To get tickets go to this link: https://www.tickettailor.com/events/rebelwisdom/152824 Philosopher Jules Evans explores how the ancient philosophy of Stoicism provides ideas and techniques for resilience and inner strength, and how these ideas have proved popular in the online manosphere and the alt-right. Has Stoicism been hijacked? Nathan Roberts, the head of the inspirational Band of Brothers network, will explain how they transform the lives of young men involved in the criminal justice system, and what their work shows about the crisis of young men in today's society. Oxford professor of ethics Dr Michael Robillard is a former US Army Ranger and Iraq War veteran. He will look at the growing sense of alienation felt by men and how to find a sense of belonging, through the prism of his experience in the US Army, and afterwards in academia. And journalist and founder of the new men's movement Rebel Wisdom, David Fuller, describes explains how he believes that men need to reinvent masculinity - and to rediscover deep brotherhood with other men to meet the challenges of the modern world. Location: Proud East, on the Canal just off Kingsland Road, Haggerston: 7pm, 27th March. Food is available from the venue - there will be a short break in proceedings at around 8.30 with time to eat. To read more about David Fuller and Rebel Wisdom's work on masculinity, check out this recent article: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/mar/09/men-after-metoo-masculinity-fundamentally-toxic • What to bring Nothing. Buy tickets before at this link: https://www.tickettailor.com/events/rebelwisdom/152824/ • Important to know Open to all genders

    Proud East

    2-10 Hertford Rd, London N1 5ET · London

    3 comments
  • Beyond the ego: a day of talks on the self
    • What we'll do This is a joint event with the Weekend University. To get a ticket, go to this website. The cost is £40 for the day, or £50 plus recordings of the talks. https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/jung-spiritual-experiences-developmental-psychology-a-day-on-the-self-tickets-43345246800?aff=JulesEvans&afu=119922299753 LPC members get a 10% discount on the standard price by using the code Jules10 Have you ever felt you went beyond your ordinary self and felt connected to something bigger than you? In a 2016 UK survey, over 84% of respondents (including atheists, agnostics, Christians, and Buddhists) said yes to this question. So what’s going on? In the complex web of modern life, we’re conditioned to embrace our rational minds and spend every second of our conscious hours in search of opportunities and threats. We are encouraged to get ahead, win friends, influence people, attract praise, avoid blame and generally focus on satisfying the individual everyday ego. Indeed, the idea of a “self”, as a unique and coherent individual, has existed ever since humans began to live in groups and become sociable. But is this egoic view of ourselves scientifically accurate? Or is there something more to the human experience? And could our most basic assumptions about who we are be wrong? In this series of talks, we explore the psychology of the ‘self’, drawing on perspectives from developmental and evolutionary psychology, Carl Jung and his approach to the psyche, and the latest scientific research into spiritual experiences – to question our most basic assumptions about who we really are, and our place in the world. Lectures & Speakers The Science of Spiritual Experiences – Jules Evans Jules Evans is Policy Director at the Centre for the History of Emotions at Queen Mary, University of London and a leading researcher into ecstatic experience. He is the author of Philosophy for Life and Other Dangerous Situations; and The Art of Losing Control. C.G Jung & His Approach to the Psyche – Dr Kevin Lu, PhD Dr Kevin Lu, PhD, is Director of Graduate Studies and Director of the MA Jungian and Post-Jungian Studies in the Department of Psychosocial and Psychoanalytic Studies, University of Essex. The Self Illusion: Why There is no ‘You’ Inside Your Head – Professor Bruce Hood Bruce Hood is the Professor of Developmental Psychology in Society in the School of Experimental Psychology at the University of Bristol. He has been a research fellow at Cambridge University and University College London, a visiting scientist at MIT and a faculty professor at Harvard. Format The format will be similar to a TED event, but with in-depth lectures and focused on the psychology of ‘The Self.’ 10:00am – 12:00pm: Session 1 12:00 – 1:00pm: Lunch break 1:00pm – 3:00pm: Session 2 3:00pm – 3:15pm: Afternoon break 3:15pm – 5:00pm: Session 3 • What to bring • Important to know Purchase tickets for this event at this link, and get a 10% discount by using the code Jules10: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/jung-spiritual-experiences-developmental-psychology-a-day-on-the-self-tickets-43345246800?aff=JulesEvans&afu=119922299753

    birkbeck University of London

    Malet Street, Bloomsbury · WC1E 7HX London

    2 comments
  • London Philosophy Club Reading group
    Wicked feelings ‘… it is not enough to succeed; others must fail’ (Iris Murdoch, The Black Prince, p. 127). ‘Whenever a friend succeeds, a little something in me dies’ (Gore Vidal) Can feelings be morally assessed? Is there any ‘wrong’ in harbouring a ‘wicked’ emotion? Or should we only judge behaviour? The reading this time looks at Robert Roberts’s analysis of envy, pride, contempt and anger. If that isn’t enough, I’ve also included Immanuel Kant’s short treatment of avarice. The files are in Dropbox at: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/zm9k35njado4mks/AABvs9jl4_RvAPvKv_BBxq2xa?dl=0 Look forward to seeing you!

    Hoop and Grapes

    80 Farringdon Street EC4A 4BL · City of London

    7 comments
  • London Philosophy Club Reading Group
    EXPLAINING THE EMOTIONS ‘Reason is, and ought only to be, the slave of the passion, and can never pretend any other office than to serve and obey them’ (Hume, A Treatise of Human Nature, Book II, Sect. III) The three reading group sessions scheduled for the coming winter will look at the emotions - how emotions in general can be approached philosophically and what philosophers have had to say about specific emotions, including ‘wicked’ ones, such as anger and bitterness, envy, and jealousy. We’ll be looking at two significant papers that initiated fresh approaches to the characterisation of emotion (one from the 1950s and one from 1980). Both are in Dropbox at the attached link. https://www.dropbox.com/sh/zm9k35njado4mks/AABvs9jl4_RvAPvKv_BBxq2xa?dl=0 As context, the Stanford Encylopedia entry on the emotions is a very useful introduction: https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/emotion/ Look forward to seeing you!

    Hoop and Grapes

    80 Farringdon Street EC4A 4BL · City of London

    10 comments
  • London Philosophy Club/Newcastle Philosophy Society
    The Kantian Catastrophe? Following Kant, the human mind finds itself condemned to a paradoxical double-take, both as source/originator of all experience, and just another object within experience. This radical reframing of philosophical questions placed the finitude of the human subject at the centre of philosophical enquiry. At the same time, it left reality in itself forever inaccessible. Famously the poet Heinrich von Kleist committed suicide in part due to despair induced by Kant’s ‘Copernican revolution’, writing that ‘my one, my highest goal has sunk from sight, and I have no other’. More recently, the French philosopher Quentin Meillassoux has referred to it as ‘the Kantian catastrophe’. This event is a collaboration between the London Philosophy Club, the Newcastle Philosophy Society (www.newphilsoc.org.uk) and newly launched Newcastle-based philosophy publisher Bigg Books (www.biggbooks.co.uk) to celebrate the launch of The Kantian Catastrophe?, a collection of interviews with 15 top philosophers (including A.W. Moore, Stella Sandford, Stephen Mulhall, Adrian Johnston, Catherine Malabou, Graham Harman, and Ray Brassier) on Immanuel Kant and his monumental legacy. Our guest speaker, Professor Stella Sandford, Professor of Modern European Philosophy at Kingston University, will address these central questions concerning our 'catastrophic' Kantian inheritance, as well as the relationship between Kant's highly controversial theory of race and his broader philosophical oeuvre. Stella Sandford has published books on Beauvoir, Levinas, and Plato, and her work focuses on the intersection of philosophy with sex, gender, race, and ethnicity. The event is free but places are limited. Copies of the book will be available to buy on the night, or are available both as a paperback and e-book on amazon. Praise for The Kantian Catastrophe? 'This is philosophy at its best. With consummate skill, Anthony Morgan engages leading philosophers in engrossing conversations about the Kantian heritage and central issues in philosophy today. The Kantian Catastrophe? is mandatory reading for anyone who wants to become acquainted with some of the most challenging and exciting trends in contemporary thought.' Raymond Tallis, author of Of Time and Lamentation. SCHEDULE 6:30 - Doors open, and some basic food, drink (alcoholic and non-alcoholic) will be available. 7:00 - Brief introduction to The Kantian Catastrophe? by editor Anthony Morgan, followed by talk from Stella Sandford. 7:45 - Q&A 8.15pm - Group discussion/debate 9:00 - Go to the pub

    Bertrand Russell Room, Conway Hall

    25 Red Lion Square, London WC1R 4RL · London

    8 comments