• Meditations of Marcus Aurelius Bk. 1-2 (Regular Meeting)

    We'll be FINISHING Donald Robertson's "How to Think Like a Roman Emperor" and STARTING Marcus Aurelius's "Meditations" - How to Think Like a Roman Emperor, CHAPTER 8 ("Death and the View from Above") [pp. [masked]] - Meditations, BOOKS 1-2 (your choice of translation) - Anything else Stoicism-related EMAIL ME IF YOU NEED A PDF OF THE ROBERTSON READING OR WOULD LIKE RECOMMENDATIONS FOR A MEDITATIONS TRANSLATION These regular meetings tend to proceed as follows... 1. The facilitator makes any administrative announcements there may be 2. Attendees share experiences with implementing any Stoic exercises/techniques 3. Attendees share insights gleaned from any ‘outside reading’ 4. The main discussion proceeds until the end of the session In terms of preparing for the main discussion, you may... 1. select a passage or two to share and discuss; 2. think of questions to propose (or answer) and/or 3. email me in advance at lastoics[at]gmail[dot]com if you would like to ensure we cover something that you find particularly meaningful. ― ― ― DESCRIPTION OF TEXT (Taken from Wikipedia page): The "Meditations" is a series of personal writings by Marcus Aurelius, Roman Emperor from 161 to 180 AD, recording his private notes to himself and ideas on Stoic philosophy. Marcus Aurelius wrote the 12 books of the Meditations in Koine Greek as a source for his own guidance and self-improvement. It is possible that large portions of the work were written at Sirmium, where he spent much time planning military campaigns from 170 to 180. Some of it was written while he was positioned at Aquincum on campaign in Pannonia, because internal notes tell us that the first book was written when he was campaigning against the Quadi on the river Granova (modern-day Hron) and the second book was written at Carnuntum. It is unlikely that Marcus Aurelius ever intended the writings to be published and the work has no official title, so "Meditations" is one of several titles commonly assigned to the collection. These writings take the form of quotations varying in length from one sentence to long paragraphs. ― ― ― See you then! — Justin K.

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  • Stoicism and Emotion, Ch. 5 (Theory Meeting)

    READING: Margaret Graver’s Stoicism and Emotion (2007), CH. 5 (“Brutishness and Insanity") [Let me know if you need a PDF of the reading] LOCATION: HomeState on N. Figueroa St. [see below of "how to find us"] TIME: WED. JAN. 22, 7pm-9pm "Theory Meetings" are dedicated to reading and discussing more difficult, technical texts. Like the early Stoics, though, I would discourage members from attending this meeting and learning theory without ALSO applying that knowledge through regular practice. That being said, all are welcome and all will be accepted regardless of background or level of preparedness — I'm just happy to talk to folks enthusiastic about Stoicism! Description of Margaret Graver’s Stoicism and Emotion: “On the surface, stoicism and emotion seem like contradictory terms. Yet the Stoic philosophers of ancient Greece and Rome were deeply interested in the emotions, which they understood as complex judgments about what we regard as valuable in our surroundings. Stoicism and Emotion shows that they did not simply advocate an across-the-board suppression of feeling, as stoicism implies in today's English, but instead conducted a searching examination of these powerful psychological responses, seeking to understand what attitude toward them expresses the deepest respect for human potential.” In terms of preparing, you MAY A) select a few passages to share and discuss; B) think of questions to propose (or answer) and/or C) email me in advance (lastoics[at]gmail[dot]com) if you would like to ensure we cover something that you find particularly meaningful. Lastly, please contact me with your email address if you need a PDF copy of the reading. Otherwise, I encourage you to purchase a text or digital version of the book. See you then! — Justin K.

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  • Special Meeting on Stoicism while Hiking

    Counterpart

    This meeting will take the form of a walk/hike through Elysian Park ... RAIN OR SHINE! We will meet at Counterpart, a coffee shop at the fork of Echo Park Ave. and Morton Ave. We will start the hike a little after 9:00 am from there. The entire trip will be LESS than 4 miles and should take LESS than 2 hours to walk, fate permitting. I will bring a small print-out full of relevant Stoic quotations that we can reflect on as we walk (perhaps about Nature!). Feel free to bring anything Stoic-related to share... but feel free NOT to bring anything, except what you might want for a hike... WHAT SHOULD YOU BRING: First, some comfy walking shoes - hiking boots or running shoes seems fine. Second, water... Optional: a shady hat, sunglasses, and [if it happens to rain], rain gear. MORE DETAILS ON HIKE: I plan to make the hike a loop. I think the route will be about 3.5 miles (half on the "Elysian Park Trail") with a total elevation gain of about 550ft. We'll get some nice views of North East Los Angeles. If some folks would like to trek further across the park, we can part ways towards the end of our time together (the trail continues around Dodger Stadium). I may decide to do this depending on what I have planed later in the day. — Justin K. P.S. If anyone is itching to go to Griffith Park, I plan to arrange several more walks/hikes this year so stay tuned!

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  • How to Think Like a Roman Emperor, CH. 6-7 (Regular Meeting)

    For this upcoming meeting, we will be focusing on the following: - CHAPTER 6 ("The Inner Citadel and War of Many Nations") [pp. [masked]] - CHAPTER 7 ("Temporary Madness") [pp. [masked]] - Anything else Stoicism-related PLEASE CONTACT ME IF YOU NEED A PDF OF THE READING These regular meetings tend to proceed as follows... 1. The facilitator makes any administrative announcements there may be 2. Attendees share experiences with implementing any Stoic exercises/techniques 3. Attendees share insights gleaned from any ‘outside reading’ 4. The main discussion proceeds until the end of the session In terms of preparing for the main discussion, you may... 1. select a passage or two to share and discuss; 2. think of questions to propose (or answer) and/or 3. email me in advance at lastoics[at]gmail[dot]com if you would like to ensure we cover something that you find particularly meaningful. ― ― ― DESCRIPTION OF TEXT: Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius was the last famous Stoic philosopher of the ancient world. . . How to Think Like a Roman Emperor takes readers on a transformative journey along with Marcus, following his progress from a young noble at the court of Hadrian—taken under the wing of some of the finest philosophers of his day—through to his reign as emperor of Rome at the height of its power. Robertson shows how Marcus used philosophical doctrines and therapeutic practices to build emotional resilience and endure tremendous adversity, and guides readers through applying the same methods to their own lives. . . Combining remarkable stories from Marcus’s life with insights from modern psychology and the enduring wisdom of his philosophy, How to Think Like a Roman Emperor puts a human face on Stoicism and offers a timeless and essential guide to handling the ethical and psychological challenges we face today. ― ― ― See you then! — Justin K.

  • How to Think Like a Roman Emperor, CH. 4-5 (Regular Meeting)

    For this upcoming meeting, we will be focusing on the following: - CHAPTER 4 ("The Choice of Hercules") [pp. [masked]] - CHAPTER 5 ("Grasping the Nettle") [pp. [masked]] PLEASE CONTACT ME IF YOU NEED A PDF OF THE READING These regular meetings tend to proceed as follows... 1. The facilitator makes any administrative announcements there may be 2. Attendees share experiences with implementing any Stoic exercises/techniques 3. Attendees share insights gleaned from any ‘outside reading’ 4. The main discussion proceeds until the end of the session In terms of preparing for the main discussion, you may... 1. select a passage or two to share and discuss; 2. think of questions to propose (or answer) and/or 3. email me in advance at lastoics[at]gmail[dot]com if you would like to ensure we cover something that you find particularly meaningful. ― ― ― DESCRIPTION OF TEXT: Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius was the last famous Stoic philosopher of the ancient world. . . How to Think Like a Roman Emperor takes readers on a transformative journey along with Marcus, following his progress from a young noble at the court of Hadrian—taken under the wing of some of the finest philosophers of his day—through to his reign as emperor of Rome at the height of its power. Robertson shows how Marcus used philosophical doctrines and therapeutic practices to build emotional resilience and endure tremendous adversity, and guides readers through applying the same methods to their own lives. . . Combining remarkable stories from Marcus’s life with insights from modern psychology and the enduring wisdom of his philosophy, How to Think Like a Roman Emperor puts a human face on Stoicism and offers a timeless and essential guide to handling the ethical and psychological challenges we face today. ― ― ― See you then! — Justin K.

  • Stoicism and Emotion, Ch. 4 (Theory Meeting)

    Location visible to members

    READING: Margaret Graver’s Stoicism and Emotion (2007), CH. 4 (“Feelings Without Assent") [Let me know if you need a PDF of the reading] LOCATION: Angel City Brewery [see below of "how to find us"] [you need to be 21 or over to enter the premises. Please let me know if this affects your attendance] TIME: DEC. 11, 7pm-9pm [This meeting has been pushed up two weeks due to Christmas — we’ll return to the 4th Wednesday of every month starting January 2020] "Theory Meetings" are dedicated to reading and discussing more difficult, technical texts. Like the early Stoics, though, I would discourage members from attending this meeting and learning theory without ALSO applying that knowledge through regular practice. That being said, all are welcome and all will be accepted regardless of background or level of preparedness — I'm just happy to talk to folks enthusiastic about Stoicism! Description of Margaret Graver’s Stoicism and Emotion: “On the surface, stoicism and emotion seem like contradictory terms. Yet the Stoic philosophers of ancient Greece and Rome were deeply interested in the emotions, which they understood as complex judgments about what we regard as valuable in our surroundings. Stoicism and Emotion shows that they did not simply advocate an across-the-board suppression of feeling, as stoicism implies in today's English, but instead conducted a searching examination of these powerful psychological responses, seeking to understand what attitude toward them expresses the deepest respect for human potential.” In terms of preparing, you MAY A) select a few passages to share and discuss; B) think of questions to propose (or answer) and/or C) email me in advance (lastoics[at]gmail[dot]com) if you would like to ensure we cover something that you find particularly meaningful. Lastly, please contact me with your email address if you need a PDF copy of the reading. Otherwise, I encourage you to purchase a text or digital version of the book. See you then! — Justin K.

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  • Stoicism and Emotion, Ch. 3 (Theory Meeting)

    Angel City Brewery

    READING: Margaret Graver’s Stoicism and Emotion (2007), CH. 3 ("Vigor and Responsibility") [Let me know if you need a PDF of the reading] LOCATION: Angel City Brewery [see below of "how to find us"] [you need to be 21 or over to enter the premises. Please let me know if this affects your attendance] TIME: NOV. 20, 7pm-9pm [This meeting has been pushed up a week due to the Thanksgiving Holiday] "Theory Meetings" are dedicated to reading and discussing more difficult, technical texts. Like the early Stoics, though, I would discourage members from attending this meeting and learning theory without ALSO applying that knowledge through regular practice. That being said, all are welcome and all will be accepted regardless of background or level of preparedness — I'm just happy to talk to folks enthusiastic about Stoicism! Description of Margaret Graver’s Stoicism and Emotion: “On the surface, stoicism and emotion seem like contradictory terms. Yet the Stoic philosophers of ancient Greece and Rome were deeply interested in the emotions, which they understood as complex judgments about what we regard as valuable in our surroundings. Stoicism and Emotion shows that they did not simply advocate an across-the-board suppression of feeling, as stoicism implies in today's English, but instead conducted a searching examination of these powerful psychological responses, seeking to understand what attitude toward them expresses the deepest respect for human potential.” In terms of preparing, you MAY A) select a few passages to share and discuss; B) think of questions to propose (or answer) and/or C) email me in advance (lastoics[at]gmail[dot]com) if you would like to ensure we cover something that you find particularly meaningful. Lastly, please contact me with your email address if you need a PDF copy of the reading. Otherwise, I encourage you to purchase a text or digital version of the book. See you then! — Justin K.

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  • How to Think Like a Roman Emperor, CH. 2-3 (Regular Meeting)

    Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius was the last famous Stoic philosopher of the ancient world. . . How to Think Like a Roman Emperor takes readers on a transformative journey along with Marcus, following his progress from a young noble at the court of Hadrian—taken under the wing of some of the finest philosophers of his day—through to his reign as emperor of Rome at the height of its power. Robertson shows how Marcus used philosophical doctrines and therapeutic practices to build emotional resilience and endure tremendous adversity, and guides readers through applying the same methods to their own lives. . . Combining remarkable stories from Marcus’s life with insights from modern psychology and the enduring wisdom of his philosophy, How to Think Like a Roman Emperor puts a human face on Stoicism and offers a timeless and essential guide to handling the ethical and psychological challenges we face today. For this upcoming meeting, we will be focusing on the following: - CHAPTER 2 ("The Most Truthful Child in Rome") [pp. 45-81] - CHAPTER 3 ("Contemplating the Sage") [pp. 83-111] PLEASE CONTACT ME IF YOU NEED A PDF OF THE READING ― ― ― These regular meetings tend to proceed as follows... 1. The facilitator makes any administrative announcements there may be 2. Attendees share experiences with implementing any Stoic exercises/techniques 3. Attendees share insights gleaned from any ‘outside reading’ 4. The main discussion proceeds until the end of the session In terms of preparing for the main discussion, you may... 1. select a passage or two to share and discuss; 2. think of questions to propose (or answer) and/or 3. email me in advance at lastoics[at]gmail[dot]com if you would like to ensure we cover something that you find particularly meaningful. See you then! — Justin K.

  • Stoicism and Emotion, Ch. 2 (Theory Meeting)

    Angel City Brewery

    "Theory Meetings" are dedicated to reading and discussing more difficult, technical texts. Like the early Stoics, though, I would discourage members from attending this meeting and learning theory without ALSO applying that knowledge through regular practice. That being said, all are welcome and all will be accepted regardless of background or level of preparedness — I'm just happy to talk to folks enthusiastic about Stoicism! READING: Margaret Graver’s Stoicism and Emotion (2007), Ch. 2 LOCATION: Angel City Brewery [see below of "how to find us"] NOTE: you need to be 21 or over to enter the premises. Let me know if this affects your attendance! TIME: OCT. 23, 7pm-9pm [location and time are open to change upon member request] Description of Margaret Graver’s Stoicism and Emotion: “On the surface, stoicism and emotion seem like contradictory terms. Yet the Stoic philosophers of ancient Greece and Rome were deeply interested in the emotions, which they understood as complex judgments about what we regard as valuable in our surroundings. Stoicism and Emotion shows that they did not simply advocate an across-the-board suppression of feeling, as stoicism implies in today's English, but instead conducted a searching examination of these powerful psychological responses, seeking to understand what attitude toward them expresses the deepest respect for human potential.” In terms of preparing, you MAY A) select a few passages to share and discuss; B) think of questions to propose (or answer) and/or C) email me in advance (lastoics[at]gmail[dot]com) if you would like to ensure we cover something that you find particularly meaningful. Lastly, please contact me with your email address if you need a PDF copy of the reading. Otherwise, I encourage you to purchase a text or digital version of the book. See you then! — Justin K.

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  • How to Think Like a Roman Emperor, CH. 1 (Regular Meeting)

    Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius was the last famous Stoic philosopher of the ancient world. . . How to Think Like a Roman Emperor takes readers on a transformative journey along with Marcus, following his progress from a young noble at the court of Hadrian—taken under the wing of some of the finest philosophers of his day—through to his reign as emperor of Rome at the height of its power. Robertson shows how Marcus used philosophical doctrines and therapeutic practices to build emotional resilience and endure tremendous adversity, and guides readers through applying the same methods to their own lives. . . Combining remarkable stories from Marcus’s life with insights from modern psychology and the enduring wisdom of his philosophy, How to Think Like a Roman Emperor puts a human face on Stoicism and offers a timeless and essential guide to handling the ethical and psychological challenges we face today. For this upcoming meeting, we will be focusing on the following: - INTRODUCTION [pp. 1-15] - CHAPTER 1 ("THE DEAD EMPEROR") [pp. 16-44] PLEASE CONTACT ME IF YOU NEED A PDF OF THE READING - - - These regular meetings tend to proceed as follows... 1. The facilitator makes any administrative announcements there may be 2. Attendees share experiences with implementing any Stoic exercises/techniques 3. Attendees share insights gleaned from any ‘outside reading’ 4. The main discussion proceeds until the end of the session In terms of preparing for the main discussion, you may... 1. select a passage or two to share and discuss; 2. think of questions to propose (or answer) and/or 3. email me in advance at lastoics[at]gmail[dot]com if you would like to ensure we cover something that you find particularly meaningful. See you then! -- Justin K.