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The Resilience Hub & Portland Maine Permaculture Message Board › Anyone done Instant Bed lasagna beds?

Anyone done Instant Bed lasagna beds?

David S.
stereoview
Washington, ME
Post #: 125
I am using a recycled painting plastic drop cloth 10x25 ft. to kill some vegetation where I want to plant. Also an old used trampoline. I put them down last fall so in a month or two I should be able to pull them back and plant. There is still snow on them.

Whether you till or not can depend on what's underneath. If you are reclaiming lawn or old farmland no till should be fine. In places where I am reclaiming, the ground is full of roots, rocks, wood, and other stuff so I need a different solution but only for the first year. You cannot stop berry roots from coming. They have to be removed. Berrys are a pericious weed on my property. Come and get some!

I used the Ruth Stout method a little last year. We will see what my asparagus does. Potatoes grown in hay come out nice and clean. Slugs got most of my peppers in hay. The tomatoes worked OK.
Lisa F.
lisa.f.organizer
Group Organizer
Portland, ME
Post #: 325
yes, we're going to experiment with the seaweed top dressing to see if it cuts back (at least) on slugs. i am also doing more stuff in containters close to the kitchen door and in other spots. right now we're also thinking about woodchucks (we have one called 'fatboy' who is extremely cheeky).

i will say that working outside the last few days...we are seeing *handfuls* of worms in the areas that we sheet mulched in 2007 and 2006 (previously lawn). turf has turned to gold.
zengeos
zengeos
Gorham, ME
Post #: 95
If I had a way to get the seaweed here, I'd try it as a thin topdressing myself. Most everything this year will be brought in, except some of the leaves and leaf mold which I'll rake up from the back acre, I suppose.
David S.
stereoview
Washington, ME
Post #: 126
You need to do something about the woodchuck. They will mow your garden rows down the first day they sprout above the ground. You will need a havahart trap or something else. I won't get carried away with foragers mentality..............

David
Lisa F.
lisa.f.organizer
Group Organizer
Portland, ME
Post #: 327
I won't get carried away with foragers mentality..............

if i get your meaning, my husband has already been talking along those lines. barring that, any other woodchuck advice/anecdotes would be helpful. thinking from a permaculture perspective, i should devise a living barrier that deters them while giving other benefits...
David S.
stereoview
Washington, ME
Post #: 127
You can put a screen fence around your garden that is buried in at the bottom. Used cat litter down their hole is supposed to get them out. There are usually at least two ends to a hole.

Other than that, I'm sure they are organic.
alder
user 6954726
Sullivan, ME
Post #: 5
wanted to add a note about seaweed (sorry no experience (luckily!) with woodchucks).... seaweed is a miracle worker, but the one time i think it can be detrimental to the garden is times like now (early spring) if it is the only "mulch" on top of the beds. on a day like today.... moist, a little rain, etc the seaweed soaks up ALL that water and if you look under it, the soil's dry. so while i think it does have slug resisting benefits later on in the season, when adequate moisture is in the soil and the plants are shading the beds some, do be careful about seaweed inadvertantly sucking up the moisture early in the spring.

and yes, i have noticed AMAZING worm populations under areas that i sheet mulched last summer. :)

alder/katie
Elaine
user 3022592
Portland, ME
Post #: 93
Zengeos, if you need newspaper we have a lot left we can share with you or anyone who needs it.

Last year when we sheetmulched the whole front and side lawns (now called "orchards" because of the 8 fruit trees there,) I emailed lots of friends and asked if they'd save their newspapers for us so we got lots! Never had to go out and get it ourselves.

So just give a holler --- you or anyone -- who wants newspapers!

Elaine
zengeos
zengeos
Gorham, ME
Post #: 101
Thanks Elaine! The going is a bit slow collecting only the black and white parts of the paper. It sometimes feels like every other page now has color print on it!!!
zengeos
zengeos
Gorham, ME
Post #: 103
by the way...once a few B14 Comfrey plants have rooted, they can be heavily pruned, AND, within a few months you can start dividing them by cutting a piece of root off and sticking it somewhere else in the ground. B14 just doesn't spread overly aggressively, and it's seeds are starile so seedlings won't pop up all over the place.

So if we can get just a few roots to start off with, that should eventually make enough for a number of people.
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