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Greg M.
user 3541854
Acton, ME
Post #: 378
Anyone eating sedum leaves that they really like? I have our native Orpine, Sedum purpureum, that I enjoy the leaves of as well as 3 ornamental garden sedums all of which I dislike. Especially disappointed in one of the garden sedums because it makes such a beautiful low ground cover, but yucky leaves. Our Orpine is nice, but doesn't seem like it'll make a good cover. I'm really hoping there are some good tasting ground cover sedums out there. Maybe I should cross our orpine with it's ground cover cousin???

BTW, I was surprised that Sedum purpureum doesn't show up in the PFAF data base...might be better than all the sedums they list.
http://www.pfaf.org/u...­
David S.
stereoview
Washington, ME
Post #: 898
Greg,

Native sedum should work as a ground cover for you but can expand somewhat slowly unless you sprout a lot of leaves. Wild Sedum is good as you noted and cultivars are lousy. Where have we heard that before? Sedum tends to sort of burn out later in the season so what was a good ground cover early ain't so hot later on. Also, I never did hear a response to my last comment about shady ground cover. I had forgotten about the best one (for a few days). Wild violets. Wild violets cover well, expand well, and the leaves and flowers are good. Good cover and good food all season.

David Spahr
Greg M.
user 3541854
Acton, ME
Post #: 379
Agreed on the violets, I have thick ground covers of a few species that I enjoy, but looking for more diversity in perennial edible foliage. My favorite tasting raw violet is a tiny white flowered aggressive spreader, but the leaves are pretty small.

I'll start propagating up more of my native Sedum and see how it performs. I'm guessing it's best in well drained sun to semi-shade. Mine currently is growing much more like a clumper, but maybe that's mostly from the competition? I definitely plan to experiment with it more to see what it likes and how it responds to a little favoring. If it really wants to be clumped islands in a sea of another cover I'll definitely use it that way...good stuff.

Just fishing to see if anyone knows of other good sedums.
Greg M.
user 3541854
Acton, ME
Post #: 380
Jackson, this is what I see at my place:
http://wildwoodsurviv...­

I didn't mention that it also has edible tubers to boot! I haven't tried those yet...maybe after I propagate up a bunch so I don't feel guilty eating them upbiggrin

I haven't seen mine flower yet because they're on the road front of my property and the town cuts everything down every year before they flower, but I think they have nice pink flowers...David, have you seen the blooms?
Edward
user 73783162
Farmingdale, ME
Post #: 4
I love learning new things! I was unaware of this plants edibility. This makes a new plant to try this spirng!
David S.
stereoview
Washington, ME
Post #: 909
As with most plants, the wild ones are superior. You can plant wild sedum practically anywhere and it will do fine without human intervention and come back year after year. But then, that's what wild plants do. For those that wish to noodle with all their plants it may seem like cheating. No soil inputs, no babysitting. Geez... what fun is it if you can't make and burn a lot of compost?

David Spahr
Barbara R.
123bubbles
Oakland, ME
Post #: 70
As a child growing up, we called this frog bellies because if you rub them just right and it all darkens from the gentle crushing, you can blow into the stem end and it blows up and looks like a frog's belly. If you lay their stems down into the ground after they have grown 8 to 10 inches, and lightly bury them you get really good propagation quickly.
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