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The Resilience Hub & Portland Maine Permaculture Message Board › back yard garden suggestions

back yard garden suggestions

A former member
Post #: 65
Mark,
Exercise a bit of caution if you plant fruit trees in a southern exposure. 'Full sun' is different from a 'southern exposure' in that you don't necessarily want to plant in a spot that warms up earlier than the rest of your yard only to have a late frost wipe out blossoms that flowered early due to the warmth of that spot. If you have a unique microclimate area that you feel is pretty protected and consistent then you can experiment with less cold hardy fruit. But be sure to plant varieties that are suited to your zone (and cold climates) as cold tolerant fruit trees need a certain number of days when the temperature is below a certain point BEFORE THEY CAN BREAK DORMANCY AND FLOWER. It's a built in protection.

Winnie
A former member
Post #: 2
Mark,
Regarding elderberries which do very well where there is more moisture in the soil, they make incredibly fine syrup for pancakes, jam, and more importantly, have been utilized to boost people's immunity. High in vitamins and other key ingredients, resistant to disease, and hardy in cold climates, I highly encourage you to plant them. Besides, the birds will join you in the feast and you won't need to plant them in soil that is as fertile as your mind....
Pilar
A former member
Post #: 100
I have had good luck rooting bushes that like wet feet simply by putting branches in water in early spring. I don't know that elderberries would take to that, but it would be worth a try. Does anyone have wild Christmas Berries on their place? I suspect they might take to that method also. I started all my Forsythia, Pussy Willow, and several Pee Gee Hydrangas [sp?] with that method.

Perhaps we should start a plant exchange thread when it warms up a little and we know what we've got.

Perhaps it is well known to all, but it sure surprised me when I first heard it. Frost actually rolls down a hill, so that would be a consideration when deciding where to place plantings.

About asparagus, just broadcast it in a tray with soil to replant later or in a protected place out doors. Or right in your heavily mulched garden in perhaps a double row, or triple row? It will come up like grass and grow, I forget exactly...perhaps to be 12 in. tall the first year? I suppose the important thing is to keep it well mulched so as to not need to weed it and disturb the roots.
zengeos
zengeos
Gorham, ME
Post #: 58
I love elderberry jelly and made some last fall, but it turned into elderberry syrup...not quite jelled enough for jelly. I am trying to expand fr4om mostly veggies to a more mixed diet planting of fruit and veggies. Fruit can be frozen, jellied and canned, and I DO have a sweet tooth!

As for plant exchange...I'd love to do some plant exchanges...I am starting from seed and winter sowing a nice variety of herbs and veggies, both medicinal and culinary herbs, and if they do well I should have a few of numerous varieties to exchange with people. I especially seem to have a lot of pepper seedlings and plan to start more this weekend...

As for wild blueberries, elderberries, etc....perhaps we could have a little *plant foraging* get together! In this day and age, it seems that, in order to retain bio9diversity we MUST salvage plants from the wild in order to ensure they aren't bulldozed in all thbe home and retail construction all over the country.

BTW, I have several Serviceberries in my front yard. Unfortunately, they are not doing much...they haven't grown much and are not branching out much at all. Perhaps I can move them to the back yard area to further increase diversity there. Also, has anyone had luck with PawPaw?
David S.
stereoview
Washington, ME
Post #: 104
I'm looking for serviceberries. Trade? I'm sure I can hook you up with a wild high bush blueberry. I have various viburnum, bay, etc. as well.

My walks will be about foraging/mushrooms/gardening BTW.

I have gotten seeds for herbs dirt cheap at Sun Market in Portland and planted them successfully in many cases. For a buck you get as many seeds as about 200 seed packets. Fennel, fenugreek, mustard, and a couple of others sprouted.

Also, Mary, if you mean winterberry as "Christmas berrys" I have loads of those. No need to root them. Just come and dig some up. I have a row at least 300 feet long.

David
A former member
Post #: 102
David I would LOVE to go on one of your nature walks! Where do you live?

BTW, I have a mushroom question. To my great surprise (and delight!) I found mushrooms growing the last day of January and again a few weeks later in the woods here in Alna.

They were 1 inch and smaller, gilled and with no veil, tannish brown on top and buff underneath, smooth and not sticky skin. The gills were, I forget the correct word to use, not divided but straight across from stem to outer edge. I believe they were on a dead oak, at the base and on the surrounding soil, most likely coming up from the dead roots. I didn't think to do a spore print, but will if I see them again. Any ideas?
zengeos
zengeos
Gorham, ME
Post #: 59
David, I may be up for a trade of one of my Serviceberries. I only have 3, and, like I mentioned, they aren't doing much after 4 years or so. Of course, I've not done anything with them since planting them between the upright willows.

If anyone wants willow branches to start growing yourself, these willows are quite upright....narrow..only 4-6' wide, but 20-25' tall after only 5 years. I'm sure I can trim some off for you if you'd like some. I plan to do some for myself to create a small fedge, perhaps. Willows like to be coppiced/trimmed heavily.

David, my main interest, right now, is edible/tasty fruiting trees and shrubs to expand the variety of things I grow myself, in large part because I can't afford the prices the markets charge.

It looks like you are around 90 minutes from Portland, East of Augusta--midway between Augusta and Belfast David?

As for Viburnum...I like V. Alnifolium, but hard to find around here..the large obovate leaves appear surprisingly airy due to the lite/loose habit of the plant. Unfortunately, they are super slow growers.
David S.
stereoview
Washington, ME
Post #: 106
Mary,

Washington is not all that far from Alna. I'm a stones throw off Rt. 17.

I have Arrowood viburnum everywhere. It is edible but not great. I have a lot of other things too. A lot of my projects are small now but there is a lot going on. If anyone wants balsam firs or other conifers I have plenty. Pines and firs make good tea and you can eat the inner bark for survival BTW. Plenty of low bush blueberries as well.

David
zengeos
zengeos
Gorham, ME
Post #: 62
David, etal, I have put my plant wantlist on the new plant wanted and have message board for continued discussion. Perhaps you all might do the same and we can have a Meetup plant exchange/trade during one of the Meetings, like the May meeting?
David S.
stereoview
Washington, ME
Post #: 109
I am east of Augusta west of Rockland. I keep saying I am going to create a list of the cast of species here cause I can't remember what all I have a lot of the time.

I will probably get to it as soon as the manuscript for my book is done.

David
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