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The Resilience Hub & Portland Maine Permaculture Message Board › Fossil Fuel Prices - The new reality or A temporary anomaly

Fossil Fuel Prices - The new reality or A temporary anomaly

Elaine
user 3022592
Portland, ME
Post #: 175
Bill Nemitz' column in the Portland Press Herald recently quoted Angus King who's predicting dire consequences if Maine doesn't act on its wind resources. Couldn't find that article but this one repeats some of his statistics on unending oil prices:
http://www.sunjournal...­

At least he's bringing the subject out in the open that might help open people's eyes.

Elaine
Elaine
user 3022592
Portland, ME
Post #: 176
A friend just sent me this:

http://oneminuteshift...­

Elaine
Penelope
user 5846522
Portland, ME
Post #: 15
Lisa, I am absolutely with you regarding a) not having expectations for a government leadership fix-it role and b) that we have to be self-reliant and prepared for disaster. Nevertheless, I feel that the government based on economical reasons will ultimately be forced to adopt, develop, and implement non-petroleum energy policies and programs.

Last night I was flipping through the cable news channels when I caught an interview with
Boone Pickens, "the Texan Oil Man," who was explaining to Glenn Beck peak oil principles, why supply can't meet demand, why it is necessary to invest in and develop alternative sources of energy and then he explained why he is a proponent and developer for wind power. I think he said he has 2500 wind generators on line and will continue to expand.
Ted M.
TedMarkow
Brunswick, ME
Post #: 55
Personally, I think we're at the tipping point where things will start happening at a faster pace. We're seeing that with the environment, and now with oil and gas prices. It is rather ironic that while global warming's effects are being felt at an alarming rate, the global demand for oil is rising at an increasing rate. Seems like logic dictates that this can't go on.

I work at Royal River Natural Foods, and I would say that a higher percentage of the people who shop there are more attuned to such things. Many of the customers I talk to believe that we are just at the beginning of peak oil, and some say that it may not be a bad thing. A customer today even went as far as to say that it usually takes a little pain to get the masses to make a move. I have to agree with that, from what I've observed in my 52 years of people watching.

One thing that has caught my eye as far as alternative sources of energy is the Citizenre program that allows people to rent photovoltaic panels. I think Mark may have mentioned that at a meetup, and I've been reminded of it. I will be looking into it soon.
Lisa F.
lisa.f.organizer
Group Organizer
Portland, ME
Post #: 417
Ted, I would agree. Dave & I have been commenting that the rate at which "peak-like" happenings are ocurring is definitely speeding up.

I do have some concern, of course, about the power of fear and the ability of the media to give an inordinate amount of play to the hoarding-and-guns crowd. It can be self-fulfilling.

Everyone on this board whose eyes are open to both the challenges and opportunities of peak oil should of course be figuring out what they can do to prepare themselves for a low (perhaps very low) energy future as well as create strong connections to their communities, as in their very neighborhoods. I know it's hard to find the time and energy, but the most important safety net we can build is the one that kicks in at the "village" or neighborhood level during tricky transition times.

Now is the time to connect with your neighbors, form a neighborhood association, have a neigborhood party and generally get to know each other. I strongly believe these connections will be critical for building future efforts upon, perhaps as soon as this coming winter.
Ted M.
TedMarkow
Brunswick, ME
Post #: 57
Now is the time to connect with your neighbors, form a neighborhood association, have a neigborhood party and generally get to know each other. I strongly believe these connections will be critical for building future efforts upon, perhaps as soon as this coming winter.

I agree that making connections is vital (that's one reason I'm in this permaculture group). My block has been having an annual block party for years. While not everyone comes, it is a chance to make contact with neighbors and build familiarity and trust. Besides, any reason for a party is a good reason! biggrin
francesco s.
user 3227838
Portland, ME
Post #: 21
The pacifier has fallen out of the baby's mouth. Simply put, the pain to change our comfortable habits only gets stronger when we don't tap into the local community and learn the skills to be self-reliant.

In Greg Palast's book, Armed Madhouse, he notes that Canada has a massive amount of oil, a kind of tar-like oil that would cost more to process. He argues that peak oil is a myth spun from an oil industry conference, open to the media in 1955 when oil prices were very low. Our tax subsidies in protecting the oil industry, convenience, lies, and unabated consumerism is what got us into this mess. Calling oil cheap and dirty, like Walmart and other soul-sucking monstrosities, makes me think of its polluting characteristic.

Also, I can't help but think that the public knowledge of the alleged toxin that leaches into plastic bottles serves the oil industry (since petroleum is used to make plastics) so that prices stabilize in order to feed the arms industry (which consumes massive amounts of oil), and at the same time feed other industries that exploit other resources such as metals. Specifically, John Perkins cites in his follow up book to Confessions of Economic Hit Man, The Secret History of the American Empire (Economic Hit Man, Jackals, And The Truth About Global Corruption), that our purchase of laptops, cell phones, and cars has a devastating effect on the people and soil of Congo where tantalum, a resource used in electronic devices is found. John Perkins proposes that we've let corrupt corporations anesthetize us into believing we don't have power.

Self-empowerment comes from a local economy, building winterized, clean, renewable energy fueled greenhouses, bicycles and other forms of self-reliance and the sharing of knowledge which meets our universal, non-hierarchical needs of health, shelter, food, water, safety, connection, support beauty, harmony, healing, meaning, teaching, creativity, mutuality, equality, grace, aliveness, peace, and joy.
Lisa F.
lisa.f.organizer
Group Organizer
Portland, ME
Post #: 425
Amen.
Elaine
user 3022592
Portland, ME
Post #: 183
Thanks for sharing the fruit of your reading, Francesco!

Francis and I held a neighborhood summer potluck picnic for many (about 28) years but we stopped in the last few years because of our all-out effort to put the basic permaculture building blocks in place.

I'm grateful for the reminder. We'll do it again this summer!

Elaine
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