addressalign-toparrow-leftarrow-rightbackbellblockcalendarcameraccwcheckchevron-downchevron-leftchevron-rightchevron-small-downchevron-small-leftchevron-small-rightchevron-small-upchevron-upcircle-with-checkcircle-with-crosscircle-with-pluscontroller-playcredit-cardcrossdots-three-verticaleditemptyheartexporteye-with-lineeyefacebookfolderfullheartglobe--smallglobegmailgooglegroupshelp-with-circleimageimagesinstagramFill 1languagelaunch-new-window--smalllight-bulblinklocation-pinlockm-swarmSearchmailmediummessagesminusmobilemoremuplabelShape 3 + Rectangle 1ShapeoutlookpersonJoin Group on CardStartprice-ribbonprintShapeShapeShapeShapeImported LayersImported LayersImported Layersshieldstartickettrashtriangle-downtriangle-uptwitteruserwarningyahooyoutube

Gear Checklist - Nashville Hiking Meetup

GEAR CHECKLISTS

Day Hiking
Essential
Pack to carry all supplies
Appropriate shoes (sturdy, waterproof and/or ankle support, depending on terrain)
Socks (non-cotton)
Non-cotton clothing is best for almost all types of hiking
Plenty of water – at least a liter per person for short hikes in winter – up to a gallon for long, strenuous hikes in summer.
Food, snacks – high-protein, high-carb. Fruit, nuts, etc.
First aid basics, particularly if hiking alone – bandannas, gauze, antiseptic, antibiotic ointment, ibuprofen or other painkiller, band-aids, moleskin
A rain jacket or poncho is great for unexpected weather – either rain or cold wind
Layered clothing – warm enough for evening temps (fleece or similar)
Compass, map and whistle, particularly if hiking alone or in wilderness

Optional
Hiking poles
Sock liners can reduce blisters on a long hike
Extra socks (great on a long and/or wet hike)
Camelback or similar hydration pack to encourage constant, steady drinking
Gloves, sunglasses, a hat for warmth or shade – depending on the season
Garbage bags and/or ziplock bags
Deeper first-aid/emergency supplies: waterproof matches, duct tape, burn balm, bee sting kit, space blanket, rope or cord, headlamp or light.

Backpacking
Essential
All gear listed under “Day Hiking”, above.
Waterproof cover for pack, or trash bag
Waterproof tent and ground cover
Sleeping bag and pad (or hammock)
Water containers – know the water availability for the whole trip and how much water to bring as well as how much you’ll have to collect and treat on the way
Camp stove, extra fuel and pots/pans
Cup, utensils, perhaps a plate or bowl
Water treatment method – chemicals, a filter or enough gas for your stove if you’re going to boil
Waterproof matches and/or firestarters
Trash bags, ziplock & freezer bags
Personal items like toilet paper, handy wipes, toothbrush and toothpaste, and hand sanitizer; biodegradable soap if you’re out long enough to need a “camp bath”.
A lightweight trowel to dig a “cat hole” (ahem, single-use latrine)
Bug spray and sunscreen
A knife
Head lamp (remember extra batteries and bulbs)
A hat for warmth or shade, depending on the season
Gloves if it’s cold (consider nighttime temps)
Sunglasses
First aid & repair kit – at minimum: bandannas, gauze, antiseptic, antibiotic ointment, ibuprofen or other painkiller, band-aids, moleskin, duct tape, back up batteries. Also consider: burn balm, bee sting kit, seam sealer, pole splint, glue, space blanket, rope (which becomes an essential in bear country, to hang food)
Map & Compass – and know how to use them and where you are on the map at all times. If you put a map in your pack and don’t pull it out until you are lost, neither map nor compass will do you any good.
A whistle to signal for help, and perhaps glow sticks
A watch – don’t rely on a cell phone!
Cash & I.D.
Personal items like prescriptions, feminine hygiene, etc.
Warm, layered clothing (again, non-cotton is best) – including warmth for night (a fleece or sweater); waterproof layer (jacket and pants) if there is any chance of rain; a change of socks and underwear.

Optional
Hiking poles are very useful for backpacking stability
Camp saw
Camp chair (for instance, the lightweight kind that turns your thermarest into a chair)
Silk or smartwool-type top and bottom – for sleeping in, or layering if it’s cold
Inflatable pillow
A change of clothes for the ride home can be most welcome
Gaiters to keep dirt/snow/grit out of socks and shoes
Camp shoes (lightweight sandals or flip-flops)

YOUR LOADED PACK SHOULD BE NO MORE THAN 30% OF YOUR BODY WEIGHT


Car Camping
Essential
Tent (with waterproof rainfly)
Air Mattress or sleeping pad
Sleeping bag or linens/blankets & pillow – keep in mind that a sleeping bag is often warmest for cold-weather camping
Towel & toiletries – know what will be available at the campground (hot showers or just cold water) and bring appropriate items. Campgrounds sometimes have soap and toilet paper in the restroom, and sometimes do not, so bring both. Quick-dry (microfiber) towels are extremely handy when camping.
Headlamp or flashlight
Sunscreen & bug spray (for all but winter – and even then sunscreen can come in handy)
Food preparation supplies: stove, plates, cups, cutlery, paper towels
Backpacking stove if no fires are allowed
Trash bags and plastic baggies
Matches and firestarters
A knife
Camp shoes and/or shower shoes
Water containers – most campgrounds have water, but check ahead – sometimes it is turned off in the off-season. And of course primitive camping situations may have no available water at any time.
Cash – camp stores sometimes take nothing else
Day-hiking gear, if you’ll be hiking (see above)
Personal items like prescriptions, feminine hygiene, etc.
First aid & repair kit – at minimum: bandannas, gauze, antiseptic, antibiotic ointment, ibuprofen or other painkiller, band-aids, moleskin, duct tape, back up batteries. Also consider: burn balm, bee sting kit, seam sealer, pole splint, glue, space blanket, rope (which becomes an essential in bear country, to hang food)
Warm, layered clothing (again, non-cotton is best) – including warmth for night (a fleece or sweater); waterproof layer (jacket and pants) if there is any chance of rain; a change of socks and underwear.

Optional
Camp chair
Shade/rain shelter
Firewood (many campgrounds and forest areas forbid importation of wood from other states, so know the rules before you bring your own)
Coleman lantern or other camp illumination
Ear plugs (campgrounds are noisy!)
Car charger for your phone (in case there is no electricity in campground)
Cooler with ice – do check and see if there will be ice available in the area before you head out with a weekend’s worth of perishables.
Alcohol – Know the camp’s policy before bringing, and always drink responsibly and discretely
A watch or alarm clock

Table of Contents

Page title Most recent update Last edited by
Hike posting template September 11, 2012 7:51 AM Kelly S.
Gear Checklist - Nashville Hiking Meetup May 3, 2010 3:05 PM Kelly S.
Hike Rating System August 19, 2013 1:43 PM Kelly S.
Code of Conduct - Nashville Hiking Meetup October 8, 2013 8:38 PM Kelly S.
Volunteer Weekend at Cumberland Trail - Stony Fork May 28, 2008 1:57 PM Kelly S.
First Aid Kit January 1, 2008 3:21 PM Kelly S.
10 Hiking Essentials April 13, 2013 7:14 AM Kelly S.
About Nashville Hiking Meetup June 25, 2018 6:08 AM Kelly S.

People in this
Meetup are also in:

Sign up

Meetup members, Log in

By clicking "Sign up" or "Sign up using Facebook", you confirm that you accept our Terms of Service & Privacy Policy