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Cafe Sci: Have we found the Higg’s boson?

Prof. Ed Copeland

School of Physics and Astronomy, Nottingham University

On July 4th 2012 CERN scientists announced that two independent experiments, CMS and ATLAS had detected a new particle of nature. This kind of discovery does not come along all that often and so it naturally led to an explosion of interest in the press and media as well as amongst physicists throughout the world.


Is it the Higgs or something else resembling a Higgs?


This talk will explain why a Higgs-like particle is required to complete the standard model of particle physics, the matter and forces which affect all of us. I will describe the incredible precision and energies associated with the LHC accelerator which allows the amazing detectors like CMS and ATLAS to observe sufficient events allow- ing the groups to announce this new particle. If it is a Higgs it completes the picture but it brings with it many unanswered questions which we will discuss. If it isn't the Higgs, then what could it be?

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  • Geoff B.

    Perhaps public thanks need to be expressed to Hugh for the programme he has put togetehr for us.

    1 · May 21, 2013

    • Neil

      fully agree for the two meetings of cafe scientifique i have been able to attend i have found them enthralling and i very much enjoy how all participants can ask a question as by asking these questions we could actually find the answers and knowledge to further inspire scientific development

      1 · May 21, 2013

  • Neil

    Absolutely brilliant it was interesting as the way that the speaker talked about the process higgs boson really linked into my thinking on the big bang theory i think that various elements on the meteors from the kepler system combined with the multiple quarks of created by the multiple explosions of the big bang made via the Higgs boson effect started the cataclysmic events of building planets through the combination of meteors that formed into planets and the combined elements made the environmental conditions on the various planets and moons the rotation possibly started by gravity

    May 21, 2013

  • Neil

    The event was amazing I really found it interesting as I think it will pave the way for more spectacular developments in astronomy and science as a whole

    1 · May 21, 2013

  • Geoff B.

    Well worth going to the meeting. A first class speaker with a depth of knowledge and able to communicate so that we can understand.
    Geoff

    1 · May 21, 2013

  • Hugh W.

    A very good session.

    1 · May 21, 2013

  • Neil

    The Higgs Boson is a fascinating development in astronomy no doubt therefore I'm looking forward to the event

    1 · May 15, 2013

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