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RE: [newtech-1] SSD based NAS solution

From: Calvin C.
Sent on: Thursday, November 8, 2012 1:20 PM

I always operate under the assumption that spinning drives or SSDs will eventually fail.  I consistently use RAID5 setups for my personal storage, I used to have as many as a dozen drives in play and in every raid setup I’ve always had one or two drives go into a failure mode eventually.  I have a RAID 1 SSD setup on an ITX server and I’ve had even one of the drives fail. 

 

One particular thing to know about is the nature of the technology used in an SSD, is electrons are being forced in and out of little glass “beads” and eventually this physically cracks these “beads” eventually (with as few as a couple of thousand writes!).  Once a surprisingly small number of these beads go bad in a block, the whole block is considered permanently lost.  Some of the best innovations with SSD has to do with how best to play a shell game—how to move the data to the next still-good location before the previous location goes bad.  This shell game is effectively hidden from the user… This means really large capacity SSD (read: expensive!) has the best chance of playing this shell game for longer because they have more reserve blocks on tap.  The other thing to consider is the very nature of redundant RAID causes lots of writes to occur across all the disks.  If all these disks are SSD, you’re accelerating the degradation.  Finally, certain innovations to control this degradation like TRIM technology have yet to be completely supported even in Intel based RAID chipsets so it’s completely unknown whether RAID SSDs will be TRIMed.  In short, having an all SSD scenario *could* result in a perfect storm for accelerated degradation. 

 

Anyway, considering this guy is moving photographs around and is essentially doing photoshop work directly off a USB 2.0 drobo I would think he would notice almost no difference by going to SSD in performance except now he would either have spent lots of money or have suddenly a lot less space? 

 

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Calvin Chu

Senior Technology Licensing Officer, Columbia Technology Ventures

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From: [address removed] [mailto:[address removed]] On Behalf Of Hanan
Sent: Wednesday, November 07,[masked]:50 PM
To: [address removed]
Subject: Re: [newtech-1] SSD based NAS solution

 

My assertion was that SSDs are no more reliable than standard drives.    Commoners, like myself, tend to mistake the "no moving parts" thing with "way more reliable".   This article somewhat suggests the same http://www.zdnet.com/blog/storage/ssd-reliability-lower-than-disks/1222

 

On Wed, Nov 7, 2012 at 3:33 PM, Chris Ferreira <[address removed]> wrote:

How do you figure an SSD is less reliable?

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Chris Ferreira
Founder & CEO
Numina Networks, Inc.
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On Wed, Nov 7, 2012 at 3:23 PM, Aaron <[address removed]> wrote:

I think the big safety gap here is remote copy. It would make sense to remote replicate (perhaps get a friend in a similar situation but geographically remote, where each hosts the others' backups or simply sending the second NAS there.) SSD is way *less* reliable than disk, and recovering thousands of pics from problem SSD would likely be potentially possible with some loss in some cases, but may cost hundreds of hours in expensive tech effort to do.


Subject: Re: [newtech-1] SSD based NAS solution
From: [address removed]
To: [address removed]
Date: Wed, 7 Nov[masked]:09:49 -0500

 

On Wed, Nov 7, 2012 at 2:50 PM, Calvin Chu <[address removed]> wrote:

If he has two Drobo units there’s no point in getting an SSD. He won’t get any more performance over the network.  If he keeps a couple of spare drives then popping them into a Drobo and rebuilding the array is easier than most.  He’ll pay a lot of money for no extra performance basically, and the issue of reliability is already mitigated by the Drobo.  So don’t bother (in my opinion).

 

Regards,

 

 

 

I have a neighbor who is a world renowned photographer whose work has appeared in National Geographic for several years and other places.





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