Dan Bentley on Build Systems & Catherine Holloway on The Mathematics of Origami

Papers We Love
Papers We Love
Public group
Location image of event venue

Details

***
PLEASE NOTE: You _must_ have your real name on your account _and_ provide a photo ID at the entrance to attend, per the venue rules.

Reminder: Papers We Love has a code of conduct. Breaching that CoC is grounds to be ejected from the meetup at the organizers' discretion.
***

Greetings Papers We Love NYC,

This month we have a pair of talks prepared! To open we have a lightning talk with Catherine Holloway on 'The Mathematics of Origami', followed by Dan Bentley on 'Build Systems a la Carte'. Check below for the details and links to the papers!

***
Build Systems a la Carte, presented by Dan Bentley
***

Authors: Andrey Mokhov, Neil Mitchell, Simon Peyton Jones

I love this paper because it explores a topic that rarely gets academic attention: build systems (such as Make). It takes a confused landscape and finds a meta-model that even the authors of those tools didn't comprehend. It makes a convincing argument that Excel (!!) is a build system. And it does it all with a healthy dose of functional programming/category theory.

I'll try to recap the paper, in terminology and figures that can make sense to users, not just functional programmers. I'll also try and lay out unexplored territory and questions I'm left with.

Paper: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/research/uploads/prod/2018/03/build-systems.pdf

***
Speaker Bio
***

Dan Bentley is a Software Engineer who's currently CEO of Tilt. Tilt's a startup building a Distributed Developer Experience, aka Make for Microservices. Previously, he worked at Google on a build tool that was a predecessor to Bazel, Open Source, and Google Sheets. He's opened for The Who and has received two checks from Donald Knuth.

***
The Mathematics of Origami presented by Catherine Holloway
***

Author: David A. Huffman

Origami designs can produce an amazing diversity of 3-dimensional shapes from a 2-dimensional piece of paper without cuts or glue. In the late 70s, David Huffman (of the Huffman Coding algorithm used in JPEG compression) showed how the same mathematical techniques used for quantifying the amount of charge in an arbitrary electric field, the Gaussian Sphere, can be used to prove which individual vertices in a crease pattern are possible from a simple piece of paper. Determining valid crease patterns has applications to computer graphics, materials science, and design.

Paper: http://www.organicorigami.com/thrackle/class/hon394/papers/HuffmanCurvatureAndCreases.pdf

***
Speaker Bio
***

Catherine Holloway is an SRE in finance. She previously gave a lightning talk about algorithms for lawn mowing, which has applications in computerized embroidery. She is about to become a mother and has already acquired the inevitable closet full of unused crafting supplies and equipment.

---
Venue:

Datadog
620 8th Ave, 45th Floor
New York, NY 10018 USA
Doors open at 6:30pm EST
---