• Elizabeth Ramirez on Transition Matrix Estimation

    Eleven Times Square Microsoft Conference Center

    Note that this meetup has MOVED from Two Sigma to Microsoft Reactor at 11 Times Square (42nd and 8th)! You _must_ have your real name on your account _and_ provide a photo ID at the entrance to attend, per the venue rules. ----- Elizabeth Ramirez will be presenting the paper "Transition Matrix Estimation in High Dimensional Time Series" (http://proceedings.mlr.press/v28/han13a.pdf). About the Paper: The state-transition matrix $A$ is a matrix you use to propagate the state vector over time, i.e. $x_{t+1} = Ax_{t} + Bu$. It usually comes from the equations that describe the system, but if you don’t know the dynamics of your system or the system is stochastic, this matrix has to be estimated. This paper presents multiple methods to estimate this matrix for high-dimensional VAR time series. ---- Speaker: Elizabeth Ramirez is an Electrical Engineer and Applied Mathematician. I'm an Applied Scientist at Descartes Labs, where I solve very large linear systems that model complex systems, like transportation. https://twitter.com/eramirem ---- You'll have to check-in with security with your Name/ID. Definitely sign-up if you’re going to attend–unfortunately people whose names aren’t entered into the security system in advance won’t be allowed in. After Elizabeth's presentation, we will open up the floor to discussion and questions. **Talks are always recorded on video and released ~2 weeks after the meetup.** We hope that you'll read some of the papers and references before the meetup, but don't stress if you can't. If you have any questions, thoughts, or related information, please visit #pwlnyc (https://paperswelove.slack.com/messages/pwlnyc/) on slack (http://papersweloveslack.herokuapp.com/), our GitHub repository (https://github.com/papers-we-love/papers-we-love), or add to the discussion on this event's thread.

  • John Langford on Real World Reinforcement Learning

    We are excited to host John Langford speaking on Real World Reinforcement Learning Talk: We’ve created a dozen real world reinforcement learning deployments enabling use cases around contextual personalization and contextual optimization culminating in the new Cognitive Services Personalizer (https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/services/cognitive-services/personalizer/) which makes these techniques available to the world on a mass scale. I’ll discuss the key technology (and papers) behind this along with the possibilities that it allows. Amongst other things, the counterfactual evaluation system we’ve created makes optimization over policies radically faster and friendlier than A/B testing. Bio: John Langford is a machine learning research scientist, a field which he says "is shifting from an academic discipline to an industrial tool". He is the author of the weblog http://hunch.net/ and the principal developer of Vowpal Wabbit (http://hunch.net/~vw/). John works at Microsoft Research New York, of which he was one of the founding members. ---- Details: **Doors open at 6:30 pm**; the presentations will begin right around 7:00 pm; and, yes, there will be refreshments of all kinds and pizza. You'll have to check-in with security with your Name/ID. Definitely sign-up if you’re going to attend–unfortunately people whose names aren’t entered into the security system in advance won’t be allowed in. After John's presentation, we will open up the floor to discussion and questions. **Talks are always recorded on video and released ~2 weeks after the meetup.** We hope that you'll read some of the papers and references before the meetup, but don't stress if you can't. If you have any questions, thoughts, or related information, please visit #pwlnyc (https://paperswelove.slack.com/messages/pwlnyc/) on slack (http://papersweloveslack.herokuapp.com/), our GitHub repository (https://github.com/papers-we-love/papers-we-love), or add to the discussion on this event's thread.

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  • John Valois on Wait-Free Synchronization

    Two Sigma

    We are excited to host John Valois speaking on Wait-Free Synchronization Talk: How do we implement data structures in a shared memory environment? The conventional answer is to use mutual exclusion, but this approach does not behave well when we encounter delays or failures in the critical section, forcing other processes to wait. Wait-Free Synchronization by Maurice Herlihy (https://cs.brown.edu/~mph/Herlihy91/p124-herlihy.pdf) explores an idea which ensures that operations complete in finite time regardless of the relative speeds of other processes. We’ll see a connection to the ubiquitous consensus problem and a framework for understanding what synchronization primitives are necessary and sufficient for implementing a given object, culminating in a method for implementing any object in a wait-free manner. Bio: John Valois is a Managing Director at BlackRock where he works on core platform engineering. ---- Details: **Doors open at 6:30 pm**; the presentations will begin right around 7:00 pm; and, yes, there will be refreshments of all kinds and pizza. You'll have to check-in with security with your Name/ID. Definitely sign-up if you’re going to attend–unfortunately people whose names aren’t entered into the security system in advance won’t be allowed in. After John's presentation, we will open up the floor to discussion and questions. **Talks are always recorded on video and released ~2 weeks after the meetup.** We hope that you'll read some of the papers and references before the meetup, but don't stress if you can't. If you have any questions, thoughts, or related information, please visit #pwlnyc (https://paperswelove.slack.com/messages/pwlnyc/) on slack (http://papersweloveslack.herokuapp.com/), our GitHub repository (https://github.com/papers-we-love/papers-we-love), or add to the discussion on this event's thread.

  • Sun-Li Beatteay on Guaranteeing Consensus in Distributed Systems with CRDTs

    We are excited to host Sun-Li Beatteay speaking on Guaranteeing Consensus in Distributed Systems with CRDTs Talk: Consensus in distributed systems has been a debated topic every since programmers discovered they could run the same program on multiple machines. Researchers have been studying consensus for decades, resulting in numerous algorithms and white papers. Unfortunately, many of these algorithms are flawed and unreliabled. However, in 2011, a team of researchers published a paper on a novel approach to distributed consensus using Conflict-free Replicated Data Types (https://hal.inria.fr/inria-00609399v1/document). This paper created quite a buzz as it showed that CRDTs were mathematically proven to guarantee consensus through "Strong Eventual Consistency." They also claimed to have solved the CAP conundrum. This presentation dives into this seminal paper in order to answer the hard questions. What are CRDTs? How do they work? And most importantly, does it actually solve CAP? By the end of this talk, everyone in the audience will have a foundational understanding of CRDTs and how they can be applied to their own work. Best of all, I will be explaining all of this is as simple language as possible. No advanced math degree required! Sound too good to be true? You'll just have to come see for yourself! Bio: Sunny Beatteay (http://sunli.co) (@SunnyPaxos https://twitter.com/SunnyPaxos) is a software engineer and writer. He works on the Storage team at DigitalOcean where he helps to build Cloud products for fellow engineers. He also writes stories and tutorials related to technology on Medium (https://medium.com/@SunnyB). Sunny lives in Brooklyn, NY. When he's not writing software, you can often find him drinking fine whiskeys, entertaining his cat, and playing Zelda. Usually at the same time. ---- Details: **Doors open at 6:30 pm**; the presentations will begin right around 7:00 pm; and, yes, there will be refreshments of all kinds and pizza. You'll have to check-in with security with your Name/ID. Definitely sign-up if you’re going to attend–unfortunately people whose names aren’t entered into the security system in advance won’t be allowed in. After Sunny's presentation, we will open up the floor to discussion and questions. **Talks are always recorded on video and released ~2 weeks after the meetup.** We hope that you'll read some of the papers and references before the meetup, but don't stress if you can't. If you have any questions, thoughts, or related information, please visit #pwlnyc (https://paperswelove.slack.com/messages/pwlnyc/) on slack (http://papersweloveslack.herokuapp.com/), our GitHub repository (https://github.com/papers-we-love/papers-we-love), or add to the discussion on this event's thread.

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  • Sarah Groff Palermo on Exception Handling: Issues and a Proposed Notation

    We are excited to host Sarah Groff Hennigh-Palermo speaking on Exception Handling: Issues and a Proposed Notation from John B. Goodenough (https://web.eecs.umich.edu/~weimerw/[masked]/reading/goodenough-exceptions.pdf) Talk: Errors and debugging are the bane of a programmer’s life — and the source of many jokes, Twitter rants, and midnight breakdowns. As programming matures as a practice, we continue to add different ways to avoid and address errors, but how did we get here to begin with? Exception Handling: Issues and a Proposed Notation from John B. Goodenough (1975) details the needs and goals of an exception handling system and then gets specific with suggestions of syntax, including remedies to known issues in the system. In this talk, we will take a look at the development of one approach to errors, — throwing and handling exceptions — as it developed in PL/I. Some of these features have not made it all the way to common modern languages, so this is a chance to take a look at what we've lost to time. Sarah Groff Hennigh-Palermo (sarahghp.com / @superSGP on Twitter) is an artist, programmer, and erstwhile data designer. Her work centers around methods to make computers and data more humane — more accessible, more flexible, more contextual. She has created data-obscured art sites, new computer languages, and hybrid nostalgia machines. Her current focuses are livecode, digital abstraction, and discovering new ways to break things. Sarah is an alumna of the School for Poetic Computation, Recurse Center, Brown University, and NYU Tandon School of Engineering. ---- Details: **Doors open at 6:30 pm**; the presentations will begin right around 7:00 pm; and, yes, there will be refreshments of all kinds and pizza. You'll have to check-in with security with your Name/ID. Definitely sign-up if you’re going to attend–unfortunately people whose names aren’t entered into the security system in advance won’t be allowed in. After Sarah's presentation, we will open up the floor to discussion and questions. **Talks are always recorded on video and released ~2 weeks after the meetup.** We hope that you'll read some of the papers and references before the meetup, but don't stress if you can't. If you have any questions, thoughts, or related information, please visit #pwlnyc (https://paperswelove.slack.com/messages/pwlnyc/) on slack (http://papersweloveslack.herokuapp.com/), our GitHub repository (https://github.com/papers-we-love/papers-we-love), or add to the discussion on this event's thread.

  • John Feminella on Impossibility of Distributed Consensus with One Faulty Process

    We're happy to host John Feminella (http://jxf.me/), technologist and advisor, presenting on Impossibility of Distributed Consensus with One Faulty Process (https://groups.csail.mit.edu/tds/papers/Lynch/jacm85.pdf) by Michael J. Fischer, Nancy A. Lynch and Michael S. Paterson. Talk If you think it's hard to get humans to agree on something, wait until you see how computers work! Computer scientists call this problem consensus, and when the computers involved are in an asynchronous environment, it's distributed consensus. For about a decade prior to this paper, computer scientists had been debating whether distributed consensus was solvable in real environments. At the time, it was known that synchronous consensus, a weaker version of distributed consensus where everyone acts at the same time, was possible — and even better, it was resilient to crashed or unreliable processes. But was the same true for distributed consensus? Can you design a distributed consensus algorithm that is resilient to these kinds of failures? As the paper's title ("Impossibility of Distributed Consensus with One Faulty Process") might suggest, the answer is "no, it isn't possible". This turns out to have sweeping implications for the reliability of distributed systems, as we'll see in our talk. See you there! Bio John Feminella (http://jxf.me/) (@jxxf (https://twitter.com/jxxf)) is an avid technologist, occasional public speaker, and curiosity advocate. He serves as an advisor to Pivotal (https://pivotal.io/), where he works on helping enterprises transform the way they write, operate, and deploy software. He's also the cofounder of a tiny analytics monitoring startup named UpHex (http://uphex.com/). John lives in Charlottesville, VA and likes meta-jokes, milkshakes, and referring to himself in the third person in speaker bios. Details Doors open at 6:30 pm; the presentations will begin right around 7:00 pm; and, yes, there will be refreshments of all kinds and pizza. You'll have to check-in with security with your Name/ID. Definitely sign-up if you’re going to attend–unfortunately people whose names aren’t entered into the security system in advance won’t be allowed in. After John's presentation, we will open up the floor to discussion and questions. We hope that you'll read some of the papers and references before the meetup, but don't stress if you can't. If you have any questions, thoughts, or related information, please visit #pwlnyc (https://paperswelove.slack.com/messages/pwlnyc/) on slack (http://papersweloveslack.herokuapp.com/), our GitHub repository (https://github.com/papers-we-love/papers-we-love), or add to the discussion on this event's thread. Additionally, if you have any papers you want to add to the repository above (papers that you love!), please send us a pull request (https://github.com/papers-we-love/papers-we-love/pulls). Also, if you have any ideas/questions about this meetup or the Papers-We-Love org, just open up an issue. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ TwoSigma (https://www.twosigma.com/) - Platinum Sponsor of the New York chapter ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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  • Elijah Ben Izzy on Divide and Conquer Algorithms

    **Please note the later start time! We will open doors at 7pm and begin at 7:30pm** We are excited to host Elijah Ben Izzy speaking on Divide and Conquer Algorithms for Closest Point problems in Multidimensional Space (http://www.cs.unc.edu/techreports/76-103.pdf) Talk: Given n points in k dimensional space, how can you efficiently find the pair that is closest together? It turns out that there’s an elegant, divide-and-conquer approach that utilizes a nifty trick. Jon Luis Bentley, a pioneer in the space of geometric algorithms, proposes this solution (and answers many more problems) in his original PhD thesis, written in 1976. The talk will focus in on his solution to the closest-pair problem, then discuss some general approaches to algorithm construction that he outlined when defending his thesis... all written with a type-writer. Elijah is a quantitative software engineer at Two Sigma. Ever since he started studying CS in college, he’s loved taking deep dives into complex, elegant algorithms and building out systems to support them. He came across Jon Luis Bentley’s PhD thesis when researching for an algorithms class, and found it to be a piece of archaeological computer science gold. ---- Lightning Talk: Dan Rubenstein will present "Time, Clocks and the Ordering of Events in a Distributed System" by Leslie Lamport (https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/research/publication/time-clocks-ordering-events-distributed-system/) Today, we take the ability to look at our phone and see what time it is for granted. But what if time weren’t so easy? In his 1978 paper “Time, Clocks, and the Ordering of Events in a Distributed System”, Leslie Lamport illustrates several key facts with time and events in distributed systems that have key importance for our ‘web-scale’ systems of 2018. We’ll investigate a few concepts from the paper, and try to understand why clocks may not be so straightforward after all. Dan Rubenstein is a software engineer at Blue State Digital. He’s worked on political campaigns in three electoral cycles, and is happy to hear your theory for why the polls were wrong. ---- Details: **Doors open at 7:00 pm**; the presentations will begin right around 7:30 pm; and, yes, there will be refreshments of all kinds and pizza. You'll have to check-in with security with your Name/ID. Definitely sign-up if you’re going to attend–unfortunately people whose names aren’t entered into the security system in advance won’t be allowed in. After Elijah's presentation, we will open up the floor to discussion and questions. We hope that you'll read some of the papers and references before the meetup, but don't stress if you can't. If you have any questions, thoughts, or related information, please visit #pwlnyc (https://paperswelove.slack.com/messages/pwlnyc/) on slack (http://papersweloveslack.herokuapp.com/), our GitHub repository (https://github.com/papers-we-love/papers-we-love), or add to the discussion on this event's thread.

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  • John Allspaw on Problem Detection

    Two Sigma

    **Please Note: We cannot accommodate +1s on your RSVP. Everyone must register and RSVP on their own.** We are excited to host John Allspaw, Principal Researcher at Adaptive Capacity Labs, presenting Problem Detection (https://www.researchgate.net/publication/220579480_Problem_detection) by Gary Klein, Rebecca Pliske, Beth Crandall, and David Woods. Talk: Published in 2005 in the journal Cognition, Technology and Work, "Problem Detection" explores the "process by which people first become concerned that events may be taking an unexpected and undesirable direction that potentially requires action." While this paper primarily centers on empirically rebutting previous theories of how problems are detected, it also puts forth many important observations and concepts for software engineering to pay close attention to. This talk won't just be a re-statement of the paper's core views; I will place these into a software engineering and operations context and connect them to SRE and DevOps worlds in ways that may be consequential. The paper's authors are Gary Klein, Rebecca Pliske, Beth Crandall, and David Woods. Paper: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/220579480_Problem_detection Bio: John Allspaw has worked in software systems engineering and operations for over twenty years in many different environments: biotech, government, online media, social networking, and e-commerce. John’s publications include the books The Art of Capacity Planning (2009) and Web Operations (2010) as well as the forward to “The DevOps Handbook”. His 2009 Velocity talk with Paul Hammond, “10+ Deploys Per Day: Dev and Ops Cooperation” helped start the DevOps movement. John served as CTO at Etsy, holds an MSc in Human Factors and Systems Safety from Lund University, and is currently a Principal Researcher at Adaptive Capacity Labs. ---- Lightning Talk: Lydia Gu on A Tutorial on Thompson Sampling Abstract: Multi-armed bandits is an online machine learning framework which trades off exploitation, selecting the current best choice, and exploration, gathering data on unknown options. One strategy for implementing this tradeoff is Thompson sampling. First proposed in 1933 in the context of clinical trials, Thompson sampling was mostly forgotten in academic literature until the recent decade. Around 2010, a couple of papers demonstrated empirically its competitive performance, prompting a flurry of academic work. In this lightning talk, we will give an overview of the multi-armed bandits problem and the Thompson sampling algorithm, and see how it has been used by companies for personalization. Paper: https://arxiv.org/pdf/1707.02038.pdf Bio: Lydia Gu is a tech lead at B12, a startup that's changing the way websites are made using humans + AI. She has an MEng from MIT and lives in New York, where she enjoys rock climbing, escape the rooms, and escaping the city. ---- Details: Doors open at 6:30 pm; the presentations will begin right around 7:00 pm; and, yes, there will be refreshments of all kinds and pizza. You'll have to check-in with security with your Name/ID. Definitely sign-up if you’re going to attend–unfortunately people whose names aren’t entered into the security system in advance won’t be allowed in. After John's presentation, we will open up the floor to discussion and questions. We hope that you'll read some of the papers and references before the meetup, but don't stress if you can't. If you have any questions, thoughts, or related information, please visit #pwlnyc (https://paperswelove.slack.com/messages/pwlnyc/) on slack (http://papersweloveslack.herokuapp.com/), our GitHub repository (https://github.com/papers-we-love/papers-we-love), or add to the discussion on this event's thread.

  • Dan Bentley on The Connection Machine

    Two Sigma

    We are excited to host Dan Bentley, CEO of Windmill, presenting The Connection Machine: Computer Architecture for the New Wave (https://dspace.mit.edu/bitstream/handle/1721.1/14719/18524280-MIT.pdf) by Danny Hillis. Talk: The Connection Machine is a computer that a time traveler borrowed from 2015 and accidentally returned to the wrong decade. How else to explain a 1985 computer with 65,536 processors? That's motivated by doing computer vision? We'll cover The Connection Machine (Danny Hillis's Ph.D. thesis) and the related "Data Parallel Algorithms" in discussing this provocative technological vision. The big question: how did the Connection Machine get so much right but end up a footnote? Bio: Dan Bentley's a software engineer building Live Development as CEO of Windmill. He's opened for The Who, and has a check from Donald Knuth. Lightning Talk: 68 years ago MIND published 'COMPUTING MACHINERY AND INTELLIGENCE' (https://www.csee.umbc.edu/courses/471/papers/turing.pdf) the paper that would gift the world 'The Turing Test'. Everyone knows it, everyone can give the basics of what the turning test is; or at least they think they do. What exactly is the Imitation Game, how was it framed, and what did Alan Turning actually care about when he proposed this idea? Lets explore together, section by section and see how this paper informed AI in the past and where it is still taking AI today. Bio: Matthew Bergman is a polyglot programmer who cares way more about people and ethics then the code he writes. He is well versed in Ruby on Rails and Western philosophy, especially Hegelian philosophy. Details Doors open at 6:30 pm; the presentations will begin right around 7:00 pm; and, yes, there will be refreshments of all kinds and pizza. You'll have to check-in with security with your Name/ID. Definitely sign-up if you’re going to attend–unfortunately people whose names aren’t entered into the security system in advance won’t be allowed in. After Dan's presentation, we will open up the floor to discussion and questions. We hope that you'll read some of the papers and references before the meetup, but don't stress if you can't. If you have any questions, thoughts, or related information, please visit #pwlnyc (https://paperswelove.slack.com/messages/pwlnyc/) on slack (http://papersweloveslack.herokuapp.com/), our GitHub repository (https://github.com/papers-we-love/papers-we-love), or add to the discussion on this event's thread. Additionally, if you have any papers you want to add to the repository above (papers that you love!), please send us a pull request (https://github.com/papers-we-love/papers-we-love/pulls). Also, if you have any ideas/questions about this meetup or the Papers-We-Love org, just open up an issue.

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  • John Feminella on Bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System

    We're happy to host John Feminella (http://jxf.me/), technologist and advisor, presenting on Bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System (https://bitcoin.org/bitcoin.pdf) by Satoshi Nakamoto on its 10-year anniversary. Talk The original Bitcoin paper was published by a pseudonymous individual named Satoshi Nakamoto on Halloween 2008, in the quiet recesses of a small cryptography mailing list, where it was mostly ignored. A couple of months afterwards, Satoshi published the original Bitcoin client software that implemented the ideas in the paper. Ten years later, a lot has happened both about cryptocurrency, and a lot of money has changed hands. In this talk, we explore the core ideas laid out in the paper, the historical background around digital currencies, and how these ideas and history were implemented in the original Bitcoin client. Bio John Feminella (http://jxf.me/) (@jxxf (https://twitter.com/jxxf)) is an avid technologist, occasional public speaker, and curiosity advocate. He serves as an advisor to Pivotal (https://pivotal.io/), where he works on helping enterprises transform the way they write, operate, and deploy software. He's also the cofounder of a tiny analytics monitoring startup named UpHex (http://uphex.com/). John lives in Charlottesville, VA and likes meta-jokes, milkshakes, and referring to himself in the third person in speaker bios. Details Doors open at 6:30 pm; the presentations will begin right around 7:00 pm; and, yes, there will be refreshments of all kinds and pizza. You'll have to check-in with security with your Name/ID. Definitely sign-up if you’re going to attend–unfortunately people whose names aren’t entered into the security system in advance won’t be allowed in. After John's presentation, we will open up the floor to discussion and questions. We hope that you'll read some of the papers and references before the meetup, but don't stress if you can't. If you have any questions, thoughts, or related information, please visit #pwlnyc (https://paperswelove.slack.com/messages/pwlnyc/) on slack (http://papersweloveslack.herokuapp.com/), our GitHub repository (https://github.com/papers-we-love/papers-we-love), or add to the discussion on this event's thread. Additionally, if you have any papers you want to add to the repository above (papers that you love!), please send us a pull request (https://github.com/papers-we-love/papers-we-love/pulls). Also, if you have any ideas/questions about this meetup or the Papers-We-Love org, just open up an issue. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ TwoSigma (https://www.twosigma.com/) - Platinum Sponsor of the New York chapter ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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