• Wagtail Space US: A Two-Day Conference for Django's Favorite CMS

    REGISTER HERE: https://us.wagtail.space/ Wagtail is a very popular content management system for the Django web framework. It is used by NASA, Amnesty International, Google, Mozilla, and powered HillaryClinton.com during the 2016 presidential election (so it scales!). More information is available here: https://wagtail.io/ Wagtail Space US will comprise talks, training and an optional sprint. The event is free, and we encourage anyone with interest to come, from beginner to expert. *** If you wish to attend, you must register at this link! Click the "Sign Up" button. *** REGISTER HERE: https://us.wagtail.space/

  • Adventures in Dunderland: Introduction to the Python Data Model

    Presented by Walt Mankowski. Hosted by PhillyPUG at the Wharton School, Huntsman Hall, room G-55. Doors at 5:30pm, pizza around 6pm, presentation shortly after. Description Python is designed to be easy to learn for beginners, and easy to pick up for experience programmers. But Python’s simplicity means you might not be using all the features the language has to offer. This is particularly true if the features don’t exist in the languages you’re used to. Last year I left academia and got a job at a startup as a Python programmer. I thought I knew the language pretty well, but a few months in I was surprised to discover a language feature I hadn't known about. Python classes have can special methods that can be used to have the classes pretend to be built-in types. These methods provide an interface to the Python data model, and they’re a key feature in writing idiomatic Python code. They can also make code look like complete magic if you don’t know they exist. In this talk I’ll try to demystify things. I’ll review Python’s double-underscore (“dunder”) methods, which combine ideas from operator overloading, mix-ins, and inheritance, but which are implemented in a unique way by Python. We’ll discuss how they can be used to have your classes emulate the behavior of Python’s internal types like lists and dictionaries. Bio Walt is a recovering ivory tower computer scientist. He’s a long-time Perl programmer and short-time Python programmer who enjoys pointing out things that Perl does better than Python to his friends and coworkers. He enjoys Perl, Python, regular expressions, high-performance computing, and Futurama.

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  • "PEP 572: The Walrus Operator", with Dustin Ingram

    Jon M. Huntsman Hall

    Hosted by PhillyPUG at the Wharton School, Huntsman Hall, room G-55. Doors at 5:30pm, pizza around 6pm, presentation shortly after. In this talk, we'll learn about a highly controversial proposed change to Python syntax, the rationale for it, and the fallout as the result of it. This talk aims to be a level-headed and rational discussion of a recently proposed syntax change to Python that created intense debate, disagreement, and eventually led our BDFL to take a 'permanent vacation'. Along the way we'll go in-depth on how new ideas about Python are proposed, discussed, and become part of the language, what's unique about Python's process compared to other open source projects, and recent developments and what they mean for the future of the wider Python community. The goal is to give the average Python user an understanding of how Python evolves, problems with the existing process, and how we can solve it. In the end, attendees should come away with not only an understanding of PEP 572 and the Python governance model, but also gain an understanding of ways in which this process can fail and even become harmful to the people involved, and how we, as users of open source software, can be better stewards of our language and better supporters of the volunteers who we depend on. Dustin is a Developer Advocate at Google, focused on supporting the Python community on the Google Cloud Platform. He's also a member of the Python Packaging Authority, a maintainer of PyPI, and organizer for the PyTexas conference.

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  • Awesome Automated APIs with Automagic REST

    Jon M. Huntsman Hall

    Hosted by PhillyPUG and PostgresPhilly at Wharton, Huntsman Hall, room 340. Doors at 5:30pm, pizza around 6pm, presentation shortly after. When you have 60,000 tables and views across hundreds of schemata sitting on top of a 3 petabyte storage footprint, automation and access privileges are key if you want to expose these data through a RESTful API. Wharton Research Data Services (WRDS) leverages Python, Django, Django REST Framework, and PostgreSQL to accomplish this. We are continuing to open source the tools we have built to make this possible! Databases stay relevant by continuing to reinvent themselves to serve new technologies further up the stack. The latest buzzwords further up that stack are APIs and microservices, so prevalent that it is hard to see a tech advertisement that doesn't mention them. While related to "the cloud" and "big data", whatever the heck those terms actually mean, APIs and microservices have a slightly less annoying marketing schtick and more concrete relations to relational databases. But what do these relations look like in practice? In this talk, Timothy Allen of WRDS will show how his team at The Wharton School has evolved from providing financial data exclusively in SAS data formats to a robust backend powered by PostgreSQL, which allows financial research to happen in many ecosystems: still available in SAS, but also R, Python, Perl, Matlab, Julia, and more. He will present a case study of using Django REST Framework to build an "API through introspection." This case study will show how WRDS built a Django web site and RESTful web service by introspecting financial data stored in a PostgreSQL database cluster. The models for the ORM, serializers for the RESTful API, views for presenting the data to a user, filters for refining queries, URL routing, web browsable interface, user token authorization, and permissions, are all handled by introspecting various features of the PostgreSQL database information schema, all with Python. Many of these components have been open-sourced, such as the ability to export an endpoint as a spreadsheet file (XLSX), and a generic automated API builder, called Automagic REST. WRDS is looking for a Python/Django developer and a PostgreSQL developer. If you want to work on an environment like the insanity described above, please contact Tim!

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  • Project Night

    Linode

    Work on your own Python projects, get programming help, work through tutorials, help others, and hang out with Pythonistas. We'll share some resources to help new coders get started under the guidance of experienced programmers. Dinner will be served, thanks to our host. We'd like to feature a few lightning talks. If you have a cool Python project you're working on and would like to share, get in touch with the PhillyPUG organizers. Works-in-progress are strongly encouraged, it is a great way to get feedback and hear new ideas! If you're hiring or looking, feel free to drop by to mingle. Be sure to bring business cards and job descriptions. Audience: Open to everyone! We welcome new coders, experienced professionals, and everything in between. Things to bring: a laptop, power cord, and a smile! All attendees are expected to follow the Python Software Foundation's Code of Conduct: https://www.python.org/psf/codeofconduct/ Please see any of the organizers if you have any questions, or are looking to host your own Python project night.

  • Code Reviews for Pythonistas with Sarah Gray

    Jon M. Huntsman Hall

    Room 340. Doors open at 5:30pm, pizza around 6pm, presentation starts around 6:15pm. Description: Let's talk about code reviews: where they work, where they fail, and -- most importantly -- how to make them better. In this talk, we'll go through small code samples and work together to make them better and more "pythonic." At the end of the talk we should have both better code and a better understanding of how to conduct productive code reviews. This is a talk for everyone but might be especially helpful for newbie coders, newbie pythonistas, and newbie code reviewers. About the Speaker: Sarah is an engineering manager and polyglot developer at Linode, a cloud hosting company based here in Philadelphia. When not nerding out over code, she is super passionate about the Philadelphia tech scene; Sarah's a co-organizer of Software as Craft Philly, PhillyPUG, and DevOpsDays Philadelphia. She's always on the lookout for Korean tacos and book recommendations.

  • Project Night

    Linode

    Work on your own Python projects, get programming help, work through tutorials, help others, and hang out with Pythonistas. We'll share some resources to help new coders get started under the guidance of experienced programmers. Dinner will be served, thanks to our host. We'd like to feature a few lightning talks. If you have a cool Python project you're working on and would like to share, get in touch with the PhillyPUG organizers. Works-in-progress are strongly encouraged, it is a great way to get feedback and hear new ideas! If you're hiring or looking, feel free to drop by to mingle. Be sure to bring business cards and job descriptions. Audience: Open to everyone! We welcome new coders, experienced professionals, and everything in between. Things to bring: a laptop, power cord, and a smile! All attendees are expected to follow the Python Software Foundation's Code of Conduct: https://www.python.org/psf/codeofconduct/ Please see any of the organizers if you have any questions, or are looking to host your own Python project night.

  • Taming Hidden State: State Charts in Python

    Huntsman Hall at The Wharton School (UPenn)

    Room 340. Doors open at 5:30pm, pizza and networking at 6pm, presentation soon after. Bio: Tom is full time Software Developer and sometimes Software Engineer. Over the past few years he's worked mainly on deploying his Data-Science teams models as APIs. This included working on an in-house cloud auto-scaling processes (no this was not done lightly, and yes there was a reasonably good reason). Talk: Do you have implicit state machines hidden in you code? Tom thinks the answer is probably "Yes". He will attempt to explain how these hidden state machines arise, and argue that there are advantages to explicitly defining them. Time permitting, he will give a brief introduction to Statecharts and some of the ways they solve the short-comings of state machines.

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  • Project Night

    Linode

    Work on your own Python projects, get programming help, work through tutorials, help others, and hang out with Pythonistas. We'll share some resources to help new coders get started under the guidance of experienced programmers. Dinner will be served, thanks to our host. We'd like to feature a few lightning talks. If you have a cool Python project you're working on and would like to share, get in touch with the PhillyPUG organizers. Works-in-progress are strongly encouraged, it is a great way to get feedback and hear new ideas! If you're hiring or looking, feel free to drop by to mingle. Be sure to bring business cards and job descriptions. Audience: Open to everyone! We welcome new coders, experienced professionals, and everything in between. Things to bring: a laptop, power cord, and a smile! All attendees are expected to follow the Python Software Foundation's Code of Conduct: https://www.python.org/psf/codeofconduct/ Please see any of the organizers if you have any questions, or are looking to host your own Python project night.

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