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The Pittsburgh Vegan Meetup Message Board › Q&A on becoming vegan

Q&A on becoming vegan

Mike E.
mike_elliot
Group Organizer
Pittsburgh, PA
Post #: 345
Recently it was suggested that we create a thread for the questions people have about transitioning to a vegan way of life. This includes, but is not limited to, question on nutrition, ethics and where to buy certain types of items.

Let the questions begin.

-Mike
A former member
Post #: 233
Thanks For The Thread; Can we list the top 5 vegan stores in Pittsburgh and where they are at.
Mike E.
mike_elliot
Group Organizer
Pittsburgh, PA
Post #: 347
Thanks For The Thread; Can we list the top 5 vegan stores in Pittsburgh and where they are at.


I guess that would depend on what one means by store. My list of grocery stores would be:



  • East End Food Co-Op (buy 98% of my stuff here)
  • Whole Foods Market (I avoid it as much as possible, a lot of non-organic produce, a lot of their fruit is waxed and they don't differentiate whether it is bees wax or not, high prices and they lobbied to weaken the organic standard)
  • Giant Eagle/Market District - small amount of organics, not a ton of vegan products, but they do carry some things that the co-op and whole foods don't)
  • Trader Joe's (they don't have a lot of organics, so I tend not to shop here; also they don't always have the same products week to week which I find annoying)
  • I can't think of a 5th option off hand


If we are talking products (e.g. non-leather shoes), the only place that comes to mind is E-House on the southside.

-Mike
Sally
Strawberry_Sal
Pittsburgh, PA
Post #: 141
I do most of my grocery shopping at the co-op, and supplement with items from Trader Joes and GE Market District, and occassionally Whole Foods.

There is a store called Sunnybridge Natural Foods in McMurray that carries some vegan options, if you happen to live in the South Hills.

The E-House Company on the South Side has clothing, accessories and shoes, but their prices are on the high side (try to hit the sales). I tend to mail order some of that kind of stuff, and for shoes, I can find non-leather styles at most department stores (Boscov's typically has a larger selection than the others), Target, and Payless.

As far as online stores, I have been really pleased with my dealings (regular orders - like once a month) from Veganessentials.com and also with Pangea (can't remember their web addy offhand - think it might be veganstore.com or something along those lines, but you can find it if you google "vegan pangea"). I really like the way you can rate products on veganessentials.com - it's really helpful when shopping to see what other people think about a product.

Sally
A former member
Post #: 234
Thanks Sally

here's a direct link to the sites Sally mentioned

Vegan Essentials

http://www.veganessen...­


The Vegan Store

http://www.veganstore...­


Blessings to all
David smile
A former member
Post #: 7
Mike,

You mentioned a few core concepts including maintaining a diet of foods with low glycemic indexes. What are examples of foods that are low verses those that are high? What number do you consider to be low and does the amount consumed have an effect? For example, if you eat a food with a low glycemic index would that be compromised by consuming a large amount?

Thanks in advance for your advice concerning this topic.

Denise
Kim
user 3152577
South Park, PA
Post #: 81
For anyone in the South Hills. Radichios, located adjacent to Sunnybridge Natural Foods in Peters Township is also a great option.
Kim
user 3152577
South Park, PA
Post #: 82
It is based out of a score of 100. I believe that 100 represents glucose. Ideally, you want to keep the foods you eat below 50, however I would go even lower than that. It can get confusing though. For instance, bread has a higher GI than ice cream because of the fat and protein in the ice cream. BTW, the GI for agave is 10. See.... isn't it weird that something so sweet can have a low GI.

You can look up the GI of foods here (under database on the left):
http://www.glycemicin...­

And find more info there as well.


Mike,

You mentioned a few core concepts including maintaining a diet of foods with low glycemic indexes. What are examples of foods that are low verses those that are high? What number do you consider to be low and does the amount consumed have an effect? For example, if you eat a food with a low glycemic index would that be compromised by consuming a large amount?

Thanks in advance for your advice concerning this topic.

Denise

Mike E.
mike_elliot
Group Organizer
Pittsburgh, PA
Post #: 349

You mentioned a few core concepts including maintaining a diet of foods with low glycemic indexes. What are examples of foods that are low verses those that are high? What number do you consider to be low and does the amount consumed have an effect? For example, if you eat a food with a low glycemic index would that be compromised by consuming a large amount?

On the high side, you have white flour, white sugar, white potatoes and white rice. The lower-glycemic counter parts would be whole grains, agave nectar, sweet potatoes and brown rice.

Generally greater than 55 is considered to be high and less than 55 to be low. The quantity of the food has nothing to do with the glycemic index of the food. It is the same whether you eat 5 grams or 5 cups. That is, eating a lot of a low glycemic whole grain is not going to raise your blood sugar appreciably. However, eating lots of high glycemic food is going to raise your blood sugar appreciably. E.g, eat 1 cup of sugar will raise your blood sugar more than 1/2 cup would.

High glycemic foods can really do a number on your energy level, hunger and weight. When you eat some your body gots a quick boost of energy and you feel good. Then your body sends out insulin to balance out the sugar and our energy level drops way back down. We feel tired and get something else to boost us back up and it can get into a vicious cycle.

There are some who say (particuarly those from the raw food community) that there is no unprocessed food (with the possible exception of a few dried fruits) that is highly glycemic and that our bodies just aren't meant to handle a lot of this stuff.

-Mike
Sara
saraPa
New Wilmington, PA
Post #: 10
I am new and am interested in feedback to guide me...
How long have you been Vegan? Why did you decide to go Vegan? What are beginners staples that I can buy at the store?
How do you handle family and social functions and deal with people who don't understand or who aren't supportive?

Any insights as to how the transition went for you . obstacles, triuphs unexpected positives/negatives. I am doing this alone and although I feel wonderful it would sure help to hear from tohers

While I run I have been listening to Vegan Raidio Podcast which has been extremely interesting.
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