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Puppy Mill Awareness Meetup (Southeast Michigan) Message Board › Michigan: Puppy Protection Act

Michigan: Puppy Protection Act

Pam
Pamela01
Group Organizer
Clarkston, MI


Meetup Members,

Merry Christmas! I have a gift of good news!!!

The Michigan Humane Society has introduced two Puppy Mill Bills for Michigan!!!! Bills HB 5230 and 5231 were introduced by Reps Vicki Barnett (Farmington Hills) and Wayne Schmidt (Kalkaska and Grand Traverse Counties) on December 14th.

They are referred to as the Puppy Protection Act.

House Bill 5230

This bill defines a large-scale breeder. Anyone that has more than 15 intact females used for breeding will need to be licensed by the state. The cost will include $500 per year for an annual inspection.

The Michigan Department of Agriculture will license and inspect, however, they will have the option to delegate inspections to county Animal Control agencies. Since some counties do not offer kennel licenses or inspects yearly, this will ensure that all large kennels are inspected.

House Bill 5231

Under this bill kennels will need to comply will new regulations in regards to food, water, shelter, vet care. This will also cap the kennels inventory limiting them to 50 intact dogs.

According to our kennel study including 83 counties, approximately 230 licensed kennels would fall under these new law/regulations. This will ensure that kennels that individually license their dogs (instead of getting the optional kennel license) will need to be licensed and inspected annually! There won’t be a county to hid in!

Since we are not a big puppy mill state, this bill will help ensure kennels do not migrate to Michigan.

Along with the Puppy Lemon Law, we will begin our lobbying activities first thing next year!

Pam Sordyl

Adwena
ieatbeans
Fair Haven, MI
Post #: 7
Do you know when humane lobby day is? I'm excited this year since I've done it now.
Pam
Pamela01
Group Organizer
Clarkston, MI
Post #: 1,184
House Bills 5230, 5231
Puppy Protection Act
Bill Would Regulate Large-Scale Breeders, Crack Down on Puppy Mills


http://www.michiganhu...­

MHS SUPPORTS

These bills would regulate large-scale breeders to ensure that animals in their care receive proper treatment, including adequate food, water, shelter and veterinary care. Currently, Michigan has no regulations in place on large-scale breeders. The Puppy Protection Act will ensure that these animals are treated humanely, crack down on irresponsible breeders, and prevent puppy mills – mass breeders who keep animals in deplorable, unimaginable conditions – from setting up shop here in Michigan.

Sponsors:

HB 5230 – Vicki Barnett (D-Farmington Hills)
HB 5231 – Wayne Schmidt (R-Traverse City)
Last action:
Introduced – 12.14.2011
Pam
Pamela01
Group Organizer
Clarkston, MI
Post #: 1,189
Support Michigan Puppy Protection

Posted by vgmichelle on Friday, January 27, 2012 • Leave a Comment

http://blogs.villageg...­

House Bills 5230 and 5231 represent the Puppy Protection Act in the State of Michigan, fighting to finally crack down on despicable owners of puppy mills. Sadly, our mighty State of Michigan has no laws in effect, preventing breeders from over-breeding or the inhumane treatment many adult dogs and their puppies are forced to endure. To the breeders, these animals are simply dollar signs and nothing more. Keeping dogs and puppies in deplorable conditions is just another day at the office for them!

No good can come from over-breeding, it merely produces unhealthy puppies that will eventually cost their new owners hundreds or even thousands of dollars, if they live long enough to be sold! Also, a puppy from one of these mills is highly likely to have separation anxiety that can develop from over-breeding the female mothers. The lack of nutrition and an appropriate time frame between litters, causes health issues that trickle down to the unborn puppies. Some owners get rid of dogs because of bad behavior, not understanding the real causes behind the behavior. Hence the filled to capacity animal shelters.
Whether you are an animal lover or a pet owner, no animal should be mistreated for any reason, and especially not for profit!

The Michigan Humane Society has been an advocate for animals since 1877 and is one of the largest animal welfare organizations in the country. Many animals would not have had a second chance at life if it weren’t for the Michigan Humane Society and the wonderful people who support this stupendous organization. To offer your support on Facebook, click HERE or to make a donations, check out their web site; Michigan Humane Society and enter your pet in the photo contest. Choose to be a part of the solution!
Pam
Pamela01
Group Organizer
Clarkston, MI
Post #: 1,192
MHS PRESS RELEASE 2/16/12



Animal Advocates and Lawmakers Unite Against Puppy Mills With Puppy Protection Act

Bipartisan bills would regulate large-scale commercial dog breeders in Michigan, ensure a minimum standard of care

http://www.michiganhu...­

LANSING – Leaders in the animal welfare industry and a bipartisan group of lawmakers called on the Michigan Legislature today to pass the Puppy Protection Act, which would crack down on large-scale commercial dog breeders in Michigan and ensure that dogs in their facilities are treated humanely.

“It is vital that Michigan act to protect untold numbers of dogs from suffering in our state and prevent our state from becoming a hot spot for puppies produced for pet stores and for sale on the Internet,” said Cal Morgan, President and CEO of the Michigan Humane Society (MHS). “While Michigan Humane Society encourages people to consider adopting one of the many wonderful animals awaiting homes at area animal shelters and rescue groups, we also believe people who purchase pets should be able to do so with confidence that these animals were raised humanely and safely.”

House Bills 5230 and 5231 (and Senate Bills 891 and 892) would establish strict guidelines for such critical issues as housing, sanitary conditions, enclosure space, exercise, and veterinary care of dogs used for breeding, many of whom live out their entire lives in these breeding facilities. The Puppy Protection Act also places an upper limit on the number of dogs that may be housed in such facilities. Importantly, the legislation exempts small-scale or “hobby” breeders from regulation.

This legislation, launched as a statewide collaboration by MHS, is sponsored by state lawmakers Rep. Vicki Barnett (D-Farmington Hills), Rep. Wayne Schmidt (R-Traverse City), Sen. Steve Bieda (D-Warren) and Sen. Rick Jones (R-Grand Ledge). It is also supported by the Michigan Association of Animal Control Officers, Puppy Mill Awareness, a Michigan-based advocacy group, and the Michigan Veterinary Medical Association.

“Michigan must not become a haven for puppy mills,” said Terry MacKillop, President of the Michigan Association of Animal Control Officers. “The Puppy Protection Act will give law enforcement the tools they need to investigate potential cases of animal abuse and neglect at large-scale kennels and breeders, and keep the bad actors out of our communities.”

The need for the legislation springs from breeders who house large numbers of dogs in close confinement for years, often without human interaction, exercise or adequate veterinary care. These animals are often forced to produce litter after litter of puppies until old age, when they may be sold, given up or killed. Their puppies are typically sold to pet stores or via the Internet. It is estimated that 99 percent of pet stores that sell puppies buy them from large-scale breeders.

MHS has worked for more than two years with concerned individuals and groups, purebred dog clubs and registries, animal control agencies, veterinarians and government officials, along with hundreds of individual dog breeders and fanciers, to gain their input and help in creating strong legislation that will protect dogs and responsible breeders while curtailing the unacceptable practices at large-scale breeding establishments.

“We must act now to prevent these puppy mills from bringing their business in other states to Michigan, and protect animals in the facilities already operating here,” said Morgan. “No animal deserves to live a life in a cage they can barely turn around in, with just enough food and water to stay alive. The Puppy Protection Act will protect our four-legged friends from a life of abuse and neglect.”

Seven states have passed puppy mill laws within the past two years, including Indiana, Pennsylvania and Ohio

Pam
Pamela01
Group Organizer
Clarkston, MI
Post #: 1,193
House Bills 5230, 5231, Senate Bills 891, 892
Puppy Protection Act


Bill Would Regulate Large-Scale Breeders, Crack Down on Puppy Mills

MHS SUPPORTS

These bills would regulate large-scale breeders to ensure that animals in their care receive proper treatment, including adequate food, water, shelter and veterinary care. Currently, Michigan has no regulations in place on large-scale breeders. The Puppy Protection Act will ensure that these animals are treated humanely, crack down on irresponsible breeders, and prevent puppy mills – mass breeders who keep animals in deplorable, unimaginable conditions – from setting up shop here in Michigan.

House Bills Sponsors:
HB 5230 – Vicki Barnett (D-Farmington Hills)
HB 5231 – Wayne Schmidt (R-Traverse City)

Senate Bills Sponsors:
SB 891 – Steven Bieda (D-Warren)
SB 892 – Rick Jones (R-Grand Ledge)

Last action:
HB 5230, 5231: Introduced – 12.14.2011
SB 891, 892: Referred to committee on Agriculture – 01.11.2012

What you can do:
Contact your state Senator and Representative, and tell them that Michigan cannot become a haven for puppy mills. Ask them to support the Puppy Protection Act today!
Contact your state Senator
Contact your state Representative
Pam
Pamela01
Group Organizer
Clarkston, MI
Post #: 1,194
PRESS CONFERENCE COVERAGE

WLNS (CBS) - Lansing, MI
6 News at Noon



http://mms.tveyes.com...­





WLNS 02/16/2012 12:02:13 PM: ...there's an effort to crack down on puppy mills in michigan. this morning at the state capitol -- people representing animal rights groups met with lawmakers. they're pushing for new legislation -- called the puppy protection act. the bills include tougher penalties for irresponsible dog breeders. the michigan humane society says the puppy industry is a multi-million dollar business -- and not all breeders give the animals the care they deserve. these are animals that usually will make it into peoples homes and if they are not healthy or they are not behavioral sound because the situation that they were raised in... that will usually cause problems and they will usually come back to shelters. the michigan humane society is a private non profit organization that cares for more than 100-thousand pets a year. investigators are trying to figure out what sparked a fire at an empty apartment home in jackson. the flames broke out at about six o'clock this morning at the building on the 1-thousand block of adrian street. heavy white smoke filled the air as firefighters tore through the home's side panels and roof to put out hot ...
Pam
Pamela01
Group Organizer
Clarkston, MI
Post #: 1,195
Puppy Protection Act Calls for Puppy Mill Prevention

http://www.wlns.com/s...­

Posted: Feb 16, 2012 6:11 AM


Photo Credit: Deerfield Township 2010 Pam Sordyl/Puppy Mill Awareness of SE Michigan

Lawmakers and animal rights groups are pushing for new legislation called the Puppy Protection Act to keep puppy mills out of Michigan.

One local woman has been working hard for years to give these dogs a better life. @
Puppy Mills are an unfortunate reality. Bills were introduced at the capital Thursday to make tougher penalties for irresponsible dog breeders here in Michigan.

"I don't consider what I do very much. It's the least that I can do," said Brandy Westcot.
Westcot has been battling against puppy mills since 2002. She started AIR dogs, or Angels in Rescue. They foster dogs from puppy mills out of private homes, giving them full medical attention and finding them a better life. It's a small local rescue that's making a big difference for dogs living in the most unthinkable of conditions.

"I'm going to try not to cry because it's emotionally wrenching," said Westcot.
Pictures can't depict how bad these mills are, and in the past 10 years Westcot has helped protect more than 200 dogs from puppy mills around the country.

"Her little tiny tummy...she was only 5 lbs...she was completely criss crossed with caesarian scars. She has been bred so many times her tiny body was pretty much all railroad scars," said Westcot.
The Michigan Humane Society says the puppy industry is a multimillion dollar business and they want to keep it out of our state. It's a push to protect those that can't protect themselves.
"They're not put on this earth to suffer...and so we need to help them whenever we can and give them a normal, good life," said Westcot.

It's a fight Westcot won't give up on.

Pam
Pamela01
Group Organizer
Clarkston, MI
Post #: 1,196
MIRS/Gongwer – these are the two main capitol news services.



MIRS - Puppy Protection Bills Pushed

Animal advocates and legislators held a press conference today pitching a bill package that would create stricter regulations for dog breeding facilities, also known as "puppy mills."

HB 5230, HB 5231, SB 0891 and SB 0892 would enforce strict guidelines for large-scale dog breeders in Michigan. These facilities often sell puppies online and to pet stores.

Operators would have to abide to new standards related to dog housing, sanitary conditions, enclosure space, exercise and veterinary care.

Large-scale breeding facilities, even those certified by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), often have numerous violations ranging from weather-exposed housing to unsanitary and unhealthy living conditions, said Cal MORGAN, president and CEO of the Michigan Humane Society. He said the problem extends to other states as well, not only Michigan.

He said the legislation was not aimed at "hobby" breeders, small-scale operations like those used to train hunting dogs.

Rep. Vicki BARNETT (D-Farmington Hills), sponsor of HB5230 said the bills targeted "very specific breeding operations" like those where dogs are stacked in cages one on top of another.

"Michigan must step up to the plate to ensure animals receive fair and humane treatment," she said.

Dogs are not an "agricultural crop," said Sen. Rick JONES (R-Grand Ledge), sponsor of SB 0892. They are "companion animals" and need to be treated as such, he said.

Sen. Steve BIEDA (D-Warren), sponsor of SB 0891, said the laws also would be a form of "dog lover" protection. He said proper care for puppies who are sold to folks in Michigan would prevent behavioral problems in the animals, making them better pets and preventing them from being put in animal control facilities that have become "dumping grounds" for unruly, often mistreated dogs.

Terry MACKILLOP, president of the Michigan Association of Animal Control Officers, said he has witnessed first hand the "hideous" atrocities of puppy farms, adding that the old kennel laws did not properly regulate these types of facilities.

Pam SORDYL, founder of Puppy Mill Awareness, sported a pin that read, "Adopt don't shop!" While supporting the legislation she said her group actively protests pet stores that purchase puppies from puppy mills and is pushing for more people to adopt from shelters rather than purchasing dogs commercially.

Gongwer - Supporters Call For Movement On Puppy Mill Bills

Sponsors and supporters of legislation that would further regulate large-scale dog breeders called for action on the bills Thursday, arguing the new guidelines are needed to ensure humane treatment of the animals.
The bipartisan package of bills (HB 5230 , HB 5231 , SB 891 , SB 892 ) was introduced near the beginning of the year and has not yet seen any committee action in either chamber.

"It is vital that Michigan act to protect untold numbers of dogs from suffering in our state and prevent our state from becoming a hot spot for puppies produced for pet stores and for sale on the Internet," said Cal Morgan, president and CEO of the Michigan Humane Society, one of the supporters of the package. "While Michigan Humane Society encourages people to consider adopting one of the many wonderful animals awaiting homes at area animal shelters and rescue groups, we also believe people who purchase pets should be able to do so with confidence that these animals were raised humanely and safely."

The so-called Puppy Protection Act would place a cap on the number of dogs that can be housed in a facility and sets requirements for sanitation and veterinary care. The bills would exempt smaller-scale breeders.

Supporters said the goal of the package is to keep the so-called puppy mills from moving to the state as other states are adopting legislation to regulate them.

Pam
Pamela01
Group Organizer
Clarkston, MI
Post #: 1,197
PRESS CONFERENCE COVERAGE

WILX (NBC) - Lansing, MI
News 10 at 6PM 2/17/12



http://mms.tveyes.com...­





WILX 02/16/2012 06:10:36 PM: ...four teenagers are taken to the jackson county youth center after police say they robbed a man at gunpoint. it happened outside "josie's take out" on south jackson street around eight last night. officers were able to track down the 15-and-16-year-olds and recover the stolen money. puppies packed into tight places and forced to live in deplorable conditions--- it's not a pleasant thought--- and there are ongoing efforts to change that. the michigan humane society is hoping lawmakers will pass legislation that would regulate facilities known as puppy mills. currently,, there are no regulations in michigan when it comes to large- scale breeding. =============== unfortunately... when you put animals in these types of conditions, they tend to have behavior problems as well as health issues that create unhealthy litters that work their way into pet stores that then work their way into homes and that's a vicious cycle." these bills would require those dogs get proper treatment,, ...
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