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Puppy Mill Awareness Meetup (Southeast Michigan) Message Board › Michigan: Puppy Protection Act

Michigan: Puppy Protection Act

Pam
Pamela01
Group Organizer
Clarkston, MI
Post #: 1,198
PRESS CONFERENCE SPEECH 2/16/12
Pam Sordyl, Puppy Mill Awarenesss of SE Michigan




Meet Gorgeous. For the past five years, she has lived with over 130 dogs in a breeding kennel up north hidden in the woods. Although she has a name, she doesn't have much else: minimal food, water and just a door-less carrier to live in. In the winter, the floor of her kennel becomes solid ice, making it painful to walk across. In the summer, she has no shade. This is unacceptable.





As the founder of Puppy Mill Awareness of SE Michigan, I have committed my time to helping breeding dogs like Gorgeous. I am certainly not alone. Puppy Mill Awareness has grown to over 400 members and has been actively working to end the mass production of commercial breeding here in Michigan and in other states since 2008.

We organize pet store protests every weekend, set up information booths, leaflet, circulate petitions and primarily set up roadblocks for puppy peddlers.

These grass roots efforts are making a difference and we are anxiously awaiting stores to convert to adoption events only.

To support the Puppy Protection Act we completed a kennel study including almost 2,000 licensed kennels covering all counties. Approximately 230 licensed kennels would fall under this new law.

This will ensure that kennels that individually license their dogs (instead of getting the optional kennel license) will need to be licensed and inspected annually!

Some large scale kennel operators have moved to counties with no Animal Control and under-staffed police, avoiding inspections and enforcement.

This will close that loophole and won’t leave one county to hide in!

We are not a big puppy mill state. In fact, we only have 4 USDA licensed commercial breeders and 21 county licensed breeders with over 50 dogs. However, we are a Midwest state – very close to the “Puppy Mill Belt” - sharing borders with states that have over 100 commercial breeders.

This bill will help ensure kennels do not migrate to Michigan as some of these states are implementing new laws of their own.

Just because we do not have a high concentration of mega mills or commercial breeders, we do have our fair share of problems and the public is demanding action.

Even our USDA licensed kennels have serious repeat violations.

These are a real dogs from a puppy mill right here in Michigan that the USDA gave their stamp of approval. This bulldog lives in a barrel on wire floors.





This dog lives in the same USDA kennel ONLY inspected by the USDA. This dog was found with inflammations in his eyes with no veterinary care.

Under the Puppy Protection Act, this kennel would need to make some changes 1) reduce their dogs from 85 to 50, 2) provide solid floors 3) provide exercise 4) seek vet care 5) provide rest between cycles and 6) and have unstacked cages.

We feel this is no way to treat man’s best friend.
We think dogs deserve better.
We think dogs deserve to be treated with dignity, respect and kindness.

Dogs do not want bigger cleaner cages.
They want to be with a family that loves them.

Regulation will help, but we also need the public to help us end the puppy pet trade.

We are asking the public to avoid contributing to cruelty by choosing adoption as the first option. Please visit your local shelter.

Pam
Pamela01
Group Organizer
Clarkston, MI
Post #: 1,199
WSYM (FOX) - Lansing, MI
FOX-47 Morning News Rewind






http://mms.tveyes.com...­

Viewership Report WSYM 02/17/2012 09:44:57 AM: ...3 puppies ---- crammed into cages and forced to live in horrible conditions. they're called 3 "puppy mills" and 3 there are currentyl no 3 regulations against them in 3 michigan. the humane society is hoping to change 3 that,, however,, urging 3 lawmakers to pass legislation that would 3 regulate the facilities. 3 3 3 3 3 unfortunately... when you put animals in these types of 3 conditions, they tend to have behavior problems 3 as well as health issues that create unhealthy litters that work their way into pet stores that then 3 3 3 3 work their way into homes and that's a vicious cycle." 3 these bills would require those dogs get proper treatment,, 3 veterinary care,, food,, and 3 3 3 shelter.
Pam
Pamela01
Group Organizer
Clarkston, MI
Post #: 1,200
On Thursday, February 16, 2012 Puppy Mill Awareness of SE Mich joined the Michigan Humane Society and a bipartisan group of lawmakers at the state Capitol in Lansing to announce the introduction of the Puppy Protection Act.

This 18 min video includes all the speakers: Senator Steven Bieda (D-Warren), Pam Sordyl, Cal Morgan (MHS President), Representative Vicki Barnett (D-Farmington Hills), Senator Rick Jones (R-Lansing), Terry Mackillop (Roscommon County Animal Control)



This critical piece of legislation will crack down on puppy mills and put up a roadblock for any puppy mill that’s looking to locate here in Michigan.

Our state must act to prevent more animal suffering and ensure that Michigan never becomes a hot spot for mass-produced puppies sold for profit. These bills will ensure that large-scale breeders have to provide animals with quality housing, a large enclosure space and sanitary conditions, as well as exercise and veterinary care. The bills will also make sure that these facilities are inspected regularly.

Pam
Pamela01
Group Organizer
Clarkston, MI
Post #: 1,201


Left: Senator Steven Bieda (D-Warren), Pam Sordyl, Cal Morgan (MHS President), Representative Vicki Barnett (D-Farmington Hills), Senator Rick Jones (R-Lansing), Terry Mackillop (Roscommon County Animal Control)


Pam
Pamela01
Group Organizer
Clarkston, MI
Post #: 1,202
FROM CAL MORGAN

Today, I was proud to represent the Michigan Humane Society as we stood with a bipartisan group of lawmakers and animal advocates at the state Capitol in Lansing to announce the introduction of the Puppy Protection Act. This critical piece of legislation will crack down on puppy mills and put up a roadblock for any puppy mill that’s looking to locate here in Michigan. Now, we need your help!

Our state must act to prevent more animal suffering and ensure that Michigan never becomes a hot spot for mass-produced puppies sold for profit. These bills will ensure that large-scale breeders have to provide animals with quality housing, a large enclosure space and sanitary conditions, as well as exercise and veterinary care. The bills will also make sure that these facilities are inspected regularly.

For more than two years, the Michigan Humane Society has worked with animal advocates, breeders, animal control agencies, veterinarians and lawmakers to craft a bill that will provide strong protections for puppies. Now, we’re asking for you to make your voice heard.

Please, contact your state Senator and Representative now, and tell them that Michigan cannot become a haven for puppy mills. Ask them to support the Puppy Protection Act today!
Contact your state Senator
Contact your state Representative

For tips on how to write elected public officials, visit www.michiganhumane.org/write.
Thanks for all you do,

Cal Morgan
President & CEO
Michigan Humane Society
P.S. You can also track the progress of the legislation on our website, or read the two bills: HB 5230, HB 5231.
Pam
Pamela01
Group Organizer
Clarkston, MI
Post #: 1,211
Meetup Members,

Last week, Puppy Mill Awareness of SE Michigan, the Michigan Humane Society and powerhouse lawmakers announced the Puppy Protection Act at the capital!

This critical piece of legislation will crack down on puppy mills and put up a roadblock for any puppy mill that's looking to locate here in Michigan. We will need your help in getting the bills passed.

1. Please share this email with all your dog loving friends.

2. Contact your legislator with a short personalized email or brief phone call.

3. RSVP for Humane Lobby Day April 17th and talk directly with your legislator or staffer.

Our state must act now to ensure that Michigan never becomes a hot spot for mass-produced puppies sold for profit like are close neighbors Ohio and Indiana. Large-scale breeders will have to provide animals with quality housing (no wire floors), a large enclosure space and sanitary conditions, as well as exercise and veterinary care. The bills will also make sure that these facilities are inspected regularly, something many currently avoid by licensing their dogs individually.



Left: Senator Steven Bieda (D-Warren), Pam Sordyl, Cal Morgan (MHS President), Representative Vicki Barnett (D-Farmington Hills), Senator Rick Jones (R-Lansing), Terry Mackillop (Roscommon CountyAnimal Control). More photos: Click here

House Bills Sponsors:
HB 5230 – Vicki Barnett (D-Farmington Hills)
HB 5231 – Wayne Schmidt (R-Traverse City)

Senate Bills Sponsors:
SB 891 – Steven Bieda (D-Warren)
SB 892 – Rick Jones (R-Grand Ledge)

Last action:
HB 5230, 5231: Introduced – 12.14.2011
SB 891, 892: Referred to committee on Agriculture­ – 01.11.2012

What you can do:
Contact your state Senator and Representative, and tell them that Michigan cannot become a haven for puppy mills. Ask them to support the Puppy Protection Act today!
Contact your state Senator
Contact your state Representative

Thank You!


Pam Sordyl
Puppy Mill Awareness of SE Michigan
734-718-7100
Pam
Pamela01
Group Organizer
Clarkston, MI
Post #: 1,212
2/20/2012 Humane Society – Announcing the Puppy Protection Act (2 minutes)






Pam
Pamela01
Group Organizer
Clarkston, MI
Post #: 1,243
Michigan: Support legislation to prevent puppy mills

The Puppy Protection Act (HB 5230 and 5231) is legislation to protect dogs in large-scale breeding facilities. This important bill would establish long overdue guidelines for housing, sanitary conditions, enclosure space, exercise, and veterinary care of dogs used by commercial breeders in Michigan. The bills would also place an upper limit on the number of dogs that may be housed in breeding facilities, to prevent our state from becoming a haven for inhumane puppy mills. The Puppy Protection Act was launched by Michigan Humane Society and is supported by the Michigan Association of Animal Control Officers, Puppy Mill Awareness, (a Michigan-based advocacy group), and the Michigan Veterinary Medical Association.

TAKE ACTION
Please use the form below to send a brief, polite message to your representatives to ask for support for The Puppy Protection Act (HB 5230 and 5231), legislation to protect dogs in large-scale breeding facilities. Remember to personalize your email message below so that your message stands out.


Puppy mills house dogs in shockingly poor conditions. After their fertility wanes, breeding animals are often killed, abandoned or sold cheaply to another mill to try and get "one more litter" out of the dog. The annual result of all this breeding is millions of puppies, many with behavior and/or health problems.

While Michigan is unique in the Midwest because it is not a puppy mill state, regulations and restrictions must be enacted now so that as our neighbors begin to crack down on puppy mills, their owners don't look to our state as a haven to set up shop. We Michiganders care about our dogs; please pass this legislation to ensure their protection!
Pam
Pamela01
Group Organizer
Clarkston, MI
Post #: 1,253
Lawmakers, animal advocates seek legislation to stop puppy mills



By Tiffany Esshaki
C & G Staff Writer

Photo courtesy of Michigan Humane Society

From left, Rep. Vicki Barnett, Michigan Humane Society President and CEO Cal Morgan, Sen. Steve Bieda and Sen. Rick Jones gathered at the Capitol in Lansing Feb. 16 to announce the Puppy Protection Act, which would crack down on large-scale breeders, or puppy mills, in Michigan.

As pet lovers snuggle up with their furry friends, many may not think about where their animals came from before they found them listed online or at a pet store. But the Michigan Humane Society estimates that 99 percent of pet store puppies are bred by large-scale breeders, or puppy mills, some of which are known for their cruel and inhumane treatment of animals to maximize profit.

That’s why animal welfare advocates and lawmakers on both sides of the aisle have joined together to introduce the Puppy Protection Act to the Michigan House and Senate. The bills would crack down on large-scale commercial breeding in the state and ensure that the dogs in those facilities are adequately cared for. Michigan Humane Society spokesman Kevin Hatman said the PPA, which was introduced at a press conference at the Capitol in Lansing Feb. 16, would create strict guidelines on issues concerning medical care, nutrition, exercise, sanitation and other practices that will help animal control officers and police officers monitor breeders and prosecute them when necessary. The regulations would also put limitations on the number of dogs that can be housed in breeding facilities and would effectively exempt smaller or “hobby” breeders.

“This is for the large-scale breeders that value profit over animal welfare. To compare them to reputable breeders that provide quality care for animals, (puppy mills) breed animals to the point of death in inhumane conditions. They don’t provide veterinary care. They give them inadequate food and water, keep them in stacked cages, and they suffer a great deal because of it.”

Hatman said the legislation, which has been in the works for more than two years, is being sponsored by Rep. Vicki Barnett, D-Farmington Hills; Rep. Wayne Schmidt, R-Traverse City; Sen. Steve Bieda, D-Warren; and Sen. Rick Jones, R-Grand Ledge. They, along with the MHS, the Michigan Association of Animal Control Officers, the Michigan Veterinary Association and Michigan-based advocacy group Puppy Mill Awareness, are pushing members of the Michigan House and Senate to pass the legislation, so it can be enforced as soon as possible. According to Michigan State University’s Animal Legal and Historical Center, as of 2011 only 35 states had passed similar laws. Hatman said that since then, many states have either enacted or proposed legislation to regulate large-scale breeders, and he expects Michigan lawmakers will back the measure.

“So far, it’s just been introduced, but we’ve had a lot of people contact their senators and representatives to support it. We’re very hopeful it will move before the end of the year.”

One person who hopes the PPA is passed is Terry MacKillop, director of Roscommon County Animal Control and president of the Michigan Association of Animal Control Officers. He’s seen on more than one occasion how dogs can suffer from conditions at puppy mills.

“It’s very sad. If you have a heart at all, it just rips you apart,” said MacKillop. He said that over the years while investigating puppy mills, he’s seen dogs that were emaciated and fed just enough to keep them alive, dogs that had lost their fur and some that were bow-legged because they were kept in cages, where they weren’t able to fully stand. MacKillop said it’s a common misconception that existing laws for kennel licensing apply to breeders, but the laws don’t target breeders, and if none for breeders are enacted, Michigan could become a haven for puppy mills.

“Right now, a lot of these complaints just fall on deaf ears. With this law, local sheriffs and police officers can go out and inspect the properties, exercise, vet care. There’s no second guessing. It spells it out.”

While lawmakers in Lansing hash out the details of the PPA, people can contact their legislators to share their support for the bills. The MHS website has tips on how advocates can reach out to the Michigan House and Senate by phone or email.

“What I tell people is that all puppy mills do is breed misery,” said MacKillop. “It’s a sad, sad situation. People ask what’s the worst thing I’ve ever seen, and those are probably the toughest.”

For information on how to contact lawmakers regarding the Puppy Protection Act, visit www.MichiganHumane.org.

Pam
Pamela01
Group Organizer
Clarkston, MI
Post #: 1,271
Meetup Members,

Below is the Fact Sheet for the Puppy Protection Act. It includes everything you need to know to speak with your senator and representatives. We will have copies made for you at Lobby Day April 17th, but I wanted you start reading ahead so you are well prepared.

Remember, the registration deadline is tomorrow. RSVP Now!

Fact Sheet
Michigan: Pass the Puppy Protection Act

(Download File)


The Puppy Protection Act (HB 5230-5231 and SB 891-892) is legislation to protect dogs in large-scale breeding facilities. This important bill would establish long overdue guidelines for housing, sanitary conditions, enclosure space, exercise, and veterinary care of dogs used by large-scale breeders in Michigan. The bills would also place an upper limit on the number of intact breeding dogs that may be housed in breeding facilities, to prevent our state from becoming a haven for inhumane puppy mills. The Puppy Protection Act was launched by Michigan Humane Society and is supported by the Michigan Association of Animal Control Officers, Puppy Mill Awareness, (a Michigan-based advocacy group), and the Michigan Veterinary Medical Association.

Stop puppy mills from coming to Michigan: Michigan is not a big puppy mill state. In fact, we only have four USDA licensed commercial breeders and twenty-one county licensed breeders with over 50 dogs. However, we are a Midwest state – very close to the "Puppy Mill Belt" - sharing borders with states that have over 100 commercial breeders. This bill will help ensure kennels do not migrate to Michigan as some of these states are implementing new laws of their own.

Protect animals in large-scale breeding facilities: Some large scale kennel operators have moved to counties with no Animal Control and under-staffed police, avoiding inspections and enforcement. The Puppy Protection Act will close that loophole and won't leave one county to hide in!

Example Case: For the past five years, this Jack Russell has lived with over 130 dogs in a breeding kennel up north hidden in the woods. She is provided minimal food, water and just a door-less carrier to live in. In the winter, the floor of her kennel becomes solid ice, making it painful to walk across and in the she has no shade.




Say No to Commercial Breeding: No animal should be mistreated for any reason, and especially not for profit! One Michigan USDA licensed breeder was cited for housing and veterinary care. This bulldog lives in a barrel on wire floors and another dog was found with untreated inflammations in his eyes.



Under the Puppy Protection Act, this kennel would need to make some changes 1) reduce their intact breeding dogs from 85 to 50, 2) provide solid floors 3) provide exercise 4) seek vet care 5) provide rest between cycles and 6) have unstacked cages.

Limit the number of animals: States are now imposing limits on the number of intact breeding animals that a kennel can posses. It has been shown in numerous cruelty cases that the potential for neglect and inadequate care increases significantly when the number of breeding animals becomes unmanageable. A limit on the number of breeding animals would prevent the introduction of overcrowded, large-scale breeding operations into Michigan as they become more restricted in other sates. Four states have caps limiting the number of intact breeding dogs.



On April 9, 2012 authorities removed over 350 dogs from a breeding kennel in Allegan County that spiraled out of control. This mother nurses under her layers of matted feces. The animals were found soaked in urine, severe dental problems and fleas.


Protect Consumers: No good can come from over-breeding, it merely produces unhealthy puppies that will eventually cost their new owners hundreds or even thousands of dollars, if they live long enough to be sold! Also, a puppy from one of these mills is highly likely to have separation anxiety that can develop from over-breeding the female mothers. The lack of nutrition and an appropriate time frame between litters, causes health issues that trickle down to the unborn puppies. Some owners get rid of dogs because of bad behavior, not understanding the real causes behind the behavior. Hence the filled to capacity animal shelters.


State action is needed: There are 34 states with laws to license or regulate dog and cat breeders. In 2009, a Michigan kennel showed that approximately 230 licensed kennels would fall under this new law. This will ensure that kennels that individually license their dogs (instead of getting the optional kennel license) will need to be licensed and inspected annually.

The full text.
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