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Puppy Mill Awareness Meetup (Southeast Michigan) Message Board › Greenwood Pets & Plants (Warren Mi)

Greenwood Pets & Plants (Warren Mi)

Pam
Pamela01
Group Organizer
Clarkston, MI
Post #: 1,496
2 birds seized from Warren pet shop die; treatment of dozens of animals continues

By NORB FRANZ
norb.franz@macombdaily.com; @norbfranz Posted: Friday, 05/17/13 12:01 am
Updated: Friday, 05/17/13 07:26 am

Two cockatiels died and dozens of other animals including birds, reptiles, kittens and a puppy remained in veterinary care Thursday, the day after animal control officers confiscated them from a Warren pet store where the owner was arrested.

Some of the surviving animals taken from Greenwood Pets & Plants by animal control officers were in good condition, but several of the 36 cockatiels were in poor condition — some bleeding and suffering from broken wings and toes. All were in shock, a veterinarian said.

“They’re not out of the woods,” said Dr. Thomas Bankstahl, owner of Parkway Small Animal & Exotic Hospital in Clinton Township, where he and the staff were busy treating the unexpected wave of patients. “It’s a little overwhelming.”

Another veterinarian, Dr. Andrea Golombek, revealed the toe on a claw of one bird was amputated.

Four macaws, including two estimated at more than 10 years old and a couple less than 2 years old, are expected to be OK. A 10-foot, albino Burmese python lay still and appeared well-fed but had a wound requiring treatment.

Bankstahl held an emaciated rooster, one of two taken from the pet store on Nine Mile Road on Wednesday.

“He couldn’t look any worse and still be alive,” he said.

Macomb County animal control officers transported a tortoise, an iguana and two bearded dragon lizards to the Clinton Township facility on Thursday, and 10 rats and 50 “feeder” mice were expected to be delivered from the Macomb County Animal Shelter later in the afternoon.

Meantime, a puppy and 10 kittens remained at the Macomb County Animal Shelter in Mount Clemens.

“Some have upper respiratory infections and are on antibiotics,” Chief Animal Control Officer Jeff Randazzo said.

The animals were taken from the pet store, which reportedly has been in business on Nine Mile Road for more than 35 years, because the facility had no electricity and water service was cut off by the city because water bills totaling about $9,000 were unpaid.

When officers arrived at the store Wednesday afternoon, they found it open for business despite the lack of utility service. They deemed it unsafe for animals and for the public to be inside.

As the animals were removed, some neighbors and customers gathered and offered to care for the animals until the issues are resolved. Some praised owner Dennis Jones as a compassionate business owner but at least one other customer was happy that crates and cages of animals were loaded into trucks.

Police said Jones was belligerent and ran through the three-level building when officers arrived to arrest him. He was removed from the building on a gurney, with a small amount of blood on his arms. He was taken away on a gurney.

Jones remained in custody Thursday, and there were unconfirmed reports that he may be charged with felony cruelty to animals.

Randazzo described the conditions inside the business as “inexcusable” and said the shop had a strong odor of animal waste.

Macomb County Executive Mark Hackel reached out to DTE Energy to have the electricity restored temporarily at the store, where fish remained inside Thursday.

Randazzo said several animal rescue organizations and private individuals have offered help ranging from shelter to donations of food.

“We’re really impressed. There’s been a lot of outreach from the community,” he added.

The confiscation of dozens of animals could spark a new ordinance in Warren.

Mayor James Fouts announced that he will propose new regulations on pet stores located in the city, including licensing and inspections.

“This case was a clear example of animal cruelty by a pet store owner who neglected the animals in his store,” Fouts said. “The conditions in the store were deplorable and inhumane.

“It was a house of horrors for the pets.”

http://www.macombdail...­
Pam
Pamela01
Group Organizer
Clarkston, MI
Post #: 1,497
Warren pet store owner charged with animal cruelty

8:16 PM, May 16, 2013 | 1 Comments

By Christina Hall

Detroit Free Press Staff Writer

They were living in the dark with no food or water, surrounded by feathers and feces.

About 100 animals removed from a Warren pet shop Wednesday remained today in the care of others as store owner Dennis Jones faced a judge on his second count of animal cruelty in less than a year.

The city’s raid on Jones’ store, Greenwood Pets on East 9 Mile, prompted Mayor Jim Fouts to propose new restrictions on pet stores in the city, grandfathering shops already in business but proposing that they be licensed and inspected.

City officials said they raided the store, a long-standing business, after a district court judge ordered the seizure of assets for a $2,100 debt Jones owes an attorney and after learning water and electricity were shut off for failure to pay.

“The conditions in the store were deplorable and inhumane. It was a house of horrors for the pets,” Fouts said.

City officials said roosters and birds were roaming and flying about the building, and a rabbit was in “bad shape.” There were iguanas, a 6-foot-long white python, a puppy and two kittens younger than 8 weeks old, Fouts said, and a 15-year-old boy running the place.

“There were literally chickens running around in the office,” Police Commissioner Jere Green said.

At least one animal — a turtle or tortoise — was dead and possibly a bird, as well. Fouts said the other animals were taken to the Macomb County Animal Shelter at the city’s expense — $27 per animal per day — and an animal hospital in Clinton Township. Power was restored for the fish still in the store.

The mayor said he is planning to propose an ordinance prohibiting the sale of live animals and regulating existing pet stores with licensing and inspections because, he said, the state stopped pet store inspections because of budget restrictions. Fouts has to work out the details with the city attorney but said he hopes to bring the proposal to the City Council at its May 28 meeting. He said he wants to prevent future abuse and mistreatment of animals in pet shops.

When officials arrived at the store Wednesday, Green said, the owner sicced a dog on a code enforcement officer. Police then went inside, eventually finding Jones hiding in the basement.

Jones, 57, was ordered held in the Macomb County Jail on $10,000 bond after his arraignment today on one count of animal cruelty (four to 10 animals), a two-year felony. If he posts bond, he is not to possess any animals, according to Warren’s 37th District Court.

Green said police conducted another search at the store today and found a substance suspected to be marijuana, so additional charges could be pending. He said officials have received several complaints about the store and Jones could face a stiffer animal cruelty charge.

He faces a similar charge in Macomb County Circuit Court for an incident last June. Warren police said that in that case, Jones failed to get medical attention for a pygmy goat. The animal eventually needed emergency surgery for an infection that was so bad it had to be castrated, police said.

A message was left for the attorney representing Jones in the circuit court case.

He has a court date Tuesday in the circuit court case and a May 30 preliminary hearing on the charge filed today.

Contact Christina Hall: chall99@freepress.com

http://www.freep.com/...­
Laura
gwaipo
Eastpointe, MI
Post #: 2
The sign outside of Greenwood now says there will be a fundraiser there this Saturday from 12-5p. I can't believe anyone would try to help this monster.
Pam
Pamela01
Group Organizer
Clarkston, MI
Post #: 1,514


Meetup Members,

Correction, ALLLLL the animals win at Greenwood Pets!- not just the neglected goat.

Dennis Jones, owner of Greenwood Pets (Warren, MI) plead guilty to felony charges of Animal Abandonment and Cruelty on Monday, July 8th at the Macomb County Circuit Court related to the neglected goat (Case 2013-240FH) and the animals that were seized this year (Case 2013-2381FH). Two felonies!

Sentencing will be on August 20th, 2013 at 8:30 a.m. RSVP to attend. http://www.meetup.com...­

TIME TO TAKE ACTION: Please take a few moments to send a hard copy letter to Judge David Viviano who will be following sentencing guidelines. This is the time for us to speak up for the animals and ask for a tough sentencing. My revised sample letter is below. You can make yours short and to the point. Make sure you include the case numbers.


16th Judicial Circuit Court
Macomb County Court Building
40 N. Main St.
Mt. Clemens, MI 48043

July 10, 2013

Honorable Judge David Viviano,

On behalf of Puppy Mill Awareness Meetup, I am writing to you regarding the two cases involving Dennis Jones, owner of Greenwood Pets & Plants (Cases 2013-240FH and 2013-2381FH Animal Abandonment and Cruelty). In light of the extreme cruelty and the suffering that these animals must have endured, I urge you to ensure that these crimes are fully punished—with sentencing conditions upon conviction that include meaningful jail time, psychological counseling and a permanent ban on contact with animals.

According to 2012 reports, Jones failed to provide veterinary care for a young pygmy goat with a urinary blockage which is painful and life threatening. Customers and concerned citizens have been filing complaints for years. Jones is a chronic offender according to multiple investigations by the Michigan Department of Agriculture. The media reported horrifying conditions this year when the animals were seized. In some cases, there were several animals crammed into a single cage. Two cockatiels died and dozens of other animals including birds, reptiles, kittens and a puppy needed veterinary care, some had upper respiratory infections. The toe of a bird was amputated, a python had an open wound and a rooster was emancipated.

Michiganians have no tolerance for animal abuse and want those who commit such acts against animals held accountable. The sheer cruelty involved in the Jones cases is shockingly severe and demands accountability.

Strong, carefully considered sentencing that includes incarceration, psychological treatment, and a ban on pet ownership is the most effective available tool for reducing recidivism and interrupting the cycle of criminal behavior.




Pam Sordyl
Founder Puppy Mill Awareness of SE Michigan
Pam
Pamela01
Group Organizer
Clarkston, MI
Post #: 1,526

Warren pet shop owner pleads no contest to animal cruelty

By NORB FRANZ
Posted: Friday, 08/02/13 06:45 pm

The owner of a Warren pet shop where dozens of animals were removed by animal control officers last spring is scheduled to be sentenced this month after pleading no contest to felony animal cruelty.
Dennis Jones, owner of Greenwood Pets & Plants, could have faced up to two years in jail and a $2,000 fine on the felony charge. In a plea agreement with a judge, Jones, 57, likely will be sentenced to probation when he returns to court on Aug. 20.

Jones also pleaded no contest in a separate case involving alleged mistreatment of a goat and other animals at the store in 2012.

Formally, he is accused of failing to provide adequate care or negligently allowing at least four but less than 10 to suffer unnecessary neglect, torture or pain.

A no-contest plea is not an admission of guilt, but it is treated as such for sentencing purposes.

“Anytime an individual goes to trial, there’s risk involved,” defense attorney Stephen Rabaut said Friday. “After having a full discussion with Mr. Jones, the evidence in the matter about how he was most likely to get a better outcome, he made the decision to enter the no-contest plea.”
Last May, Warren and Macomb County animal control officials removed dozens of animals — including birds, kittens, a puppy, two roosters, an iguana, a tarantula and a 10-foot python — from the landmark business on Nine Mile Road near Schoenherr because the facility lacked electricity and water service because utilities were cut off. Most were mildly to severely under-nourished.

Of the three dozen cockatiels, several were bloodied and some had broken wings and toes. Two died less than 24 hours after being removed.

Around the same time, Jones remained the target of a garnishment effort filed last autumn against Greenwood Pets & Plants by an attorney who had previously represented Jones in an unrelated case. That lawyer, Robert Binkowski, claimed in September 2012 that he was owed more than $2,000 for handling a 2007 civil lawsuit against Jones that resulted in the dismissal of a claim against the pet shop owner.

In late March, 37th District Judge Jennifer Faunce — now a judge in Macomb County Circuit Court — found Greenwood in default and ruled that business property could be seized. Due to issues involving storage of live animals, Faunce ruled that the animals be sold immediately.

Most of the injured and malnourished animals were taken to Parkway Small Animal & Exotic Hospital in Clinton Township. Some of the cockatiels were expected to undergo months of treatment, including a few that faced amputation of toes.

Under Faunce’s order, all the animals were briefly under the legal control of court officer Paul Zalenski.
“The only thing I sold was the remaining tropical fish, which was the cheap fish, because the power was being shut off,” Zalenski said Friday. He said four fish distributors declined to buy the approximately 250 fish for $100 before one dealer agreed.

“The problem was everybody who came to look at them … were afraid if they put the animals into a tank with healthy ones, the risk of (spreading) disease would be too great,” Zalenski said.

Faunce’s order last spring was trumped in late June, when prosecutors initiated a forfeiture case against Jones and his business. Jones agreed on June 24 to relinquish ownership of animals that had been for sale, including: a dog, five rabbits, a dozen cats, an albino Burmese python, three iguanas, the roosters, the tarantula, one tortoise, nine chickens, 31 rats, five dozen mice and several lizards. Under the agreement, Jones essentially surrendered the animals to two veterinary hospitals and the Macomb County Animal Shelter.

Meantime, nine other birds — including four macaws — and a cat were ordered to be placed in homes or with caregivers that could provide adequate care and living conditions, according to court records. Those animals were considered Jones’ pets but could not stay with him because of bail restrictions against him in the animal cruelty case that prevented him from possessing animals.

Rabaut said he thinks any ailments or injuries suffered by animals at Greenwood may have been due to challenging economic conditions faced by the business.

“He is an animal lover and he never meant any harm to any animals,” Rabaut said of Jones. “The bottom line is he thought it in his best interest to resolve this.”

An animal welfare organization that pushed Warren officials to take action against Greenwood had hoped Jones would face more severe punishment.

“We wanted jail time (for him),” said Pam Sordyl, founder of Puppy Mill Awareness of Southeast Michigan. “We’re going to be at sentencing, for sure.”


The sentencing agreement that calls for probation was reached in July with Macomb County Visiting Judge Thomas Brookover. Brookover was filling in for Circuit Judge David Viviano after Viviano was appointed to the Michigan Supreme Court by Gov. Rick Snyder.

Faunce, who had ordered in May that the animals at Greenwood should be sold immediately, was appointed by Snyder last month to fill the vacancy on the Circuit Court bench. She takes over Viviano’s caseload, but Brookover is expected to return to handle the sentencing of Jones.

The current whereabouts of all the animals was not immediately known Friday.

http://www.dailytribu...­
Pam
Pamela01
Group Organizer
Clarkston, MI
Post #: 1,527

ACTION ALERT!
A new judge has been assigned to handle the Greenwood Pets & Plants (Warren, MI) animal cruelty sentencing on August 20th (pls attend-wear your PMA shirts). We are asking members to take a few moments and send a hard copy letter to the new Judge Thomas Brookover who will be following sentencing guidelines for the case involving the neglected goat (Case 2013-240FH) and the animals that were seized this year (Case 2013-2381FH). This is the time we need to speak up for the animals and ask for a tough sentencing. In my new letter to Brookover I am asking him to reconsider the Cobs Agreement for probation only. You can make yours short and to the point also asking for jail time or a long probation with a ban on animals. Make sure you include the case numbers. 

16th Judicial Circuit Court
Macomb County Court Building
40 N. Main St.
Mt. Clemens, MI 48043

August 4, 2013

Honorable Judge Thomas Brookover,

On behalf of Puppy Mill Awareness of Southeast Michigan, I am writing to you regarding the two cases involving Dennis Jones, owner of Greenwood Pets & Plants (Cases 2013-240FH and 2013-2381FH Animal Abandonment and Cruelty). In light of the extreme cruelty and the suffering that these animals must have endured, I urge you to ensure that these crimes are fully punished—with sentencing conditions that include meaningful jail time, psychological counseling and a permanent ban on contact with animals.

Please reconsider the Cobs Agreement for probation only.

According to 2012 reports, Jones failed to provide veterinary care for a young pygmy goat with a urinary blockage which is painful and life threatening. Customers and concerned citizens have been filing complaints for years. Jones is a chronic offender according to multiple investigations by the Michigan Department of Agriculture. The media reported horrifying conditions this year when the animals were seized and some animals died from their injuries and illnesses. There were several animals crammed into a single cage. Two cockatiels died and dozens of other animals including birds, reptiles, kittens and a puppy needed veterinary care, some had upper respiratory infections. The toe of a bird was amputated, a python had an open wound and a rooster was emancipated.

Michiganians have no tolerance for animal abuse and want those who commit such acts against animals held accountable. The sheer cruelty involved in the Jones cases is shockingly severe and demands accountability.

Strong, carefully considered sentencing that includes incarceration, psychological treatment, and a ban on pet ownership is the most effective available tool for reducing recidivism and interrupting the cycle of criminal behavior.




Pam Sordyl
Founder Puppy Mill Awareness of SE Michigan
Pam
Pamela01
Group Organizer
Clarkston, MI
Post #: 1,549

Greenhouse Pets and Plants owner to be sentenced for animal cruelty Tuesday

Related Links
•Pet shop owner charged, animal cruelty
•Pets removed from shop, owner…

WARREN, Mich., (WXYZ) - A former Macomb County pet shop owner is set to be sentenced Tuesday morning in a case of animal cruelty.

Police raided his Greenwood Pets and Plants store in Warren last May. They originally went to the shop to collect a debt Jones owed.

Inside they found more than 100 animals living in horrible conditions. Some of them had been without food and water for days, others were crammed into cages.

Jones' friends say he's a good guy who just got overwhelmed.


Read more: http://www.wxyz.com/d...­
Pam
Pamela01
Group Organizer
Clarkston, MI
Post #: 1,550


Pet store owner gets probation

By NORB FRANZ
norb.franz@macombdaily.com; @norbfranz Posted: Tuesday, 08/20/13 02:33 pm

Greenwood Pets & Plants owner Dennis Jones, right, and his attorney, Stephen Rabaut, listen to a judge during a sentencing hearing. (The Macomb Daily/DAVID N. POSAVETZ)

The owner of a Warren pet store who pleaded no-contest to animal cruelty charges is prohibited from possessing animals for two years, under terms of probation set by a judge on Tuesday.

Dennis Jones, owner of Greenwood Pets & Plants, also was sentenced to six months in jail but Macomb County Circuit Visiting Judge Thomas Brookover held the incarceration in abeyance to determine whether Jones complies with all terms of probation for two years.

The judge ordered Jones, 57, to avoid alcohol, undergo substance abuse counseling, perform 60 hours of community service, and pay court costs.

Jones’ attorney and the Macomb County Prosecutor’s Office still must determine the amount — estimated at approximately $9,000 — that the longtime business owner must pay to the Macomb County Animal Shelter for its cost in caring for the few animals that eventually were returned to him after police removed dozens from the landmark store on Nine Mile Road after the utilities were shut off in May.

RELATED ASSETS
Pet shop owner sentenced
Reaction to sentencing

In an agreement reached with the judge in July, Jones pleaded no-contest to two counts of abandoning/cruelty of four to 10 animals — a felony offense punishable by up to two years in jail and a $2,000 fine — in exchange for a sentence of one year probation. Formally, he was accused of failing to provide adequate care or negligently allowing at least four but less than 10 to suffer unnecessary neglect, torture or pain.

A no-contest plea is not an admission of guilt, but it treated as such for sentencing purposes.

Judge Brookover, who received letters from animal welfare advocates, doubled the length at the sentencing hearing. Jones, who did not address the court before sentencing, could have withdrawn from the “Cobbs agreement,” but did not.

“I don’t think anyone was looking for jail time,” defense attorney Stephen Rabaut said after the hearing. “I don’t’ think (the second year) came as a shock to him.”

The 2-year ban on animal possession may be the most difficult part of the probation for Jones and impacts his ability to make a living, Rabaut said.

Jones took over Greenwood Pets & Plants from his father. But the business suffered during the recession, Rabaut said.

“It’s been very difficult for him. No question. He is an animal lover. At no time did he intend to be cruel to any animal,” the defense lawyer added.

“I think he is looking at having someone else run his business at this time.”

Some birds that were returned to Jones via a third party will now have to be cared for by someone else.

Pam Sordyl, founder of Puppy Mill Awareness of Southeast Michigan, an organization that has fielded complaints about Greenwood Pets & Plants, believes her letter and others led to the slightly stiffer probation.

“Two (years) is a little bit better,” she said outside the courtroom.

The first animal cruelty charge resulted from an anonymous tip in 2012 that a pygmy goat was suffering from a urinary tract blockage. The Warren police animal control division convinced Jones to give up the goat, which was taken to a veterinary facility in Richmond by 4 Paws 1 Heart. The group, which relies on donations, paid slightly over $500 for the medical treatment that saved the animal’s life.

“The goat belonged to him, and he should’ve been responsible,” said Diana Rascano of 4 Paws 1 Heart.

After utilities were shut off in May, Warren and Macomb County animal control officials removed dozens of animals — including several birds, kittens, a puppy, two roosters, an iguana, a tarantula and a 10-foot albino Burmese python — from the building. Many were mildly to severely malnourished.

Of the three dozen cockatiels, several were bloodied and some had broken wings and toes. Two died less than 24 hours after being removed.

Around the same time that the animals were removed, Jones remained the target of a garnishment effort filed last autumn against Greenwood Pets & Plants by an attorney who had previously represented Jones in an unrelated case. In late March, a Warren district judge found Greenwood in default and ruled that business property could be seized. Due to issues involving storage of live animals, District Judge Jennifer Faunce — now a Macomb Circuit Court jurist — ruled that the animals should be sold immediately.

However, Faunce’s order last spring was trumped in late June, when prosecutors initiated a forfeiture case against Jones and his business. Jones agreed on June 24 to relinquish ownership of most of the animals that had been for sale.

Sordyl hopes the prosecution sends a message to pet shop owners motivated by profits.

“Lazy people do this to make money. There’s a huge markup,” she said.
Pam
Pamela01
Group Organizer
Clarkston, MI
Post #: 1,551
POSTING LATE -- out of order. Sorry, I missed this article posted back in May.

Pet store owner faces felony cruelty charge

May 17, 2013
By Brian Louwers
C & G Staff Writer

WARREN – The owner of a longtime neighborhood pet shop in Warren is facing a felony animal cruelty charge after police removed dozens of animals kept in what was described as “deplorable” conditions.

Dennis Jones, 57, of Pontiac, was arraigned before 37th District Court Judge Jennifer Faunce May 16 on one count of animal cruelty, a two-year felony.

Jones was taken into custody by Warren police May 15 after a city zoning inspector contacted animal control officers about Greenwood Pets & Plants, on Nine Mile east of Schoenherr.

Detective Sgt. Stephen Mills said city inspectors were originally sent to the shop to enforce a judgment of property on a civil matter through the 37th District Court, but that police were alerted when the conditions inside the store were observed.

Officials said utility service, including both electricity and water, were apparently shut off for lack of payment.

City officials said water service was cut because the business had an outstanding bill totaling more than $9,000.

Warren animal control officer Lisa Taylor said at least 60 animals were removed from the store and taken to a veterinary clinic for treatment. Animals taken from Greenwood Pets & Plants included iguanas, a six-foot albino python, rabbits and chickens, dogs, cats, kittens and puppies, and many birds.

A turtle was among the animals that didn’t survive, despite being removed from the store where Taylor said there were incidents of “severe overcrowding” and dirty conditions.

Some animals were also reportedly observed without food or water, and the store was darkened without power.

Warren Police Sgt. Larry Garner thanked DTE Energy Co. May 17 for restoring power while officers worked to remove the animals. Efforts remained ongoing to find homes for saltwater and freshwater fish that would have likely perished without electricity to power filtration systems.

Jones told Faunce at his arraignment he was scheduled for trial in Macomb County Circuit Court this month in another case where he faces the same charge.

Warren police said the previous animal cruelty charge was filed last summer after Jones allegedly neglected to seek treatment for a goat with a medical condition.

Jones requested court-appointed legal counsel and Faunce cautioned him about making statements during the hearing.

But speaking about both the new and existing animal cruelty charges, Jones said, “I’ve attended all the hearings and so forth and look forward to defending both our company for 60 years and no such charge as this.”

Several Warren residents in attendance at the arraignment said they’d support Jones.

Jamie Gilson, 37, said she’s lived near the store for two years and that Jones was a kind-hearted shop owner who cares about his animals but was maybe “overwhelmed” by the financial burden of maintaining the store.

Greenwood Pets & Plants was described as a family business that’s operated for at least 35 years.

“It may be somewhat poor conditions but everybody’s got to understand he’s by his self. He’s trying to run the place by his self,” Gilson said. “He don’t want to hire people if he can’t pay them.”

Gilson said supporters would attempt to organize a fund to help defray Jones’ financial burdens and save the store.

“He’s going to try to keep it going. That’s a business his dad built from the ground up,” Gilson said.

Police said Jones was found hiding in a basement area of the store when they arrived to remove the animals May 15. But Jones and his supporters told the court that wasn’t the case.

The situation prompted Warren Mayor Jim Fouts to propose a new ordinance banning the sale of live animals at any new stores in the city.

Fouts said the state no longer inspects pet stores but that licensing and inspection could be conducted locally by the city.

Jones is next scheduled to appear in the 37th District Court for a preliminary examination on the newest animal cruelty charge at 8:45 a.m. May 30.

He was reportedly freed May 16 after supporters posted a $10,000 bond but Faunce ordered him to refrain from possessing animals pending resolution of the case.

You can reach C & G Staff Writer Brian Louwers at or at (586)498-1089.

http://www.candgnews....­
Pam
Pamela01
Group Organizer
Clarkston, MI
Post #: 1,597

Warren Animal Control Officer Commended for
ending pet store neglect at Greenwoods Pets & Plants


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: October 21, 2013
CONTACT: Pam Sordyl, 734-828-1400, pmamichinfo@yahoo.com

WARREN MI - Puppy Mill Awareness of Southeast Michigan, a grassroots group dedicated to public education about the suffering of animals in puppy mills, commends Officer Lisa Taylor of Warren Animal Control for taking the lead in ending chronic animal neglect at Greenwoods Pets & Plants, a retail pet store at 13983 E. 9 Mile Rd. in Warren. On October, 7, 2013 the store’s owner, Dennis Jones, was arrested for violating his probation terms restricting him from possessing animals only a month after being sentenced by Judge David Viviano on animal cruelty charges.

“We are grateful to Officer Taylor for her dedication to the protection of animals in Warren, including those in pet stores,” said Pam Sordyl, founder of Puppy Mill Awareness of Southeast Michigan. “We hope that other Michigan animal control and law enforcement officers will follow her lead in being more proactive in enforcing our state’s animal cruelty and neglect laws.”

On September, 19, 2013, a member of Puppy Mill Awareness observed a loose rooster in the fenced in lot of the store and notified Officer Taylor. This appeared to be the same rooster that was seized earlier by animal control. Upon discovering that a cockatiel bird had also been sold at the store the previous day, Taylor quickly contacted the prosecutor and probation officer who conducted an inspection. They found that many of the birds seized from the store earlier in the year on animal cruelty charges had been returned to the store by those that had completed adoption contracts.

In May of 2013, Officer Taylor was instrumental in having all of the animals seized from the store because of violations of the state’s animal cruelty law. In the store, two cockatiels were found dead, several animals were crammed into a single cage, birds, reptiles, kittens and a puppy required urgent veterinary intervention, and some had upper respiratory infections. In addition, the toe of a bird had to be amputated due to neglect, a python was discovered with an open wound, and a rooster was found emaciated.

Following the recent probation violation investigation, Taylor convinced the owners of the store to sign over the animals to the custody of the city, including more than eight birds, a cat and two roosters. The store is now up for sale.

After the store sold a potbellied pig named “Chumbley” in 2010 to a family that was not allowed to keep him because of restrictions on owning farm animals in Warren city limits, Taylor agreed to keep a closer eye on the store and respond to complaints outside of her assigned area. In 2011, Taylor pursued felony animal cruelty charges against the store after a goat on store property was found to have a serious urinary tract blockage and would have died without prompt veterinary care.

Puppy Mill Awareness encourages the city of Warren to take the protection of animals in pet stores one step further and an adopt a Humane Pet Acquisition ordinance that would prevent the retail sale of cats, dogs, rabbits, long-lived birds and large-reptiles within city limits. We also ask that the city encourage its residents to instead adopt animals at local rescues, sanctuaries and animal shelters instead of buying them from pet stores.

Puppy Mill Awareness of Southeast Michigan is working to end the mass production of dogs in commercial kennels, or "puppy mills.” Our mission is to educate the public about the cruel cycle of commercial dog breeding and the pet store link. Read more at www.meetup.com/puppymillawareness.
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