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Puppy Mill Awareness Meetup (Southeast Michigan) Message Board › What to Do if You Have Purchased a Sick Puppy

What to Do if You Have Purchased a Sick Puppy

Pam
Pamela01
Group Organizer
Clarkston, MI
Post #: 507
Do you know someone who has purchased a sick dog from a pet store or breeder? Although there are no Michigan Puppy Lemon Laws to protect consumers, there are many things that can be done. Check out the Puppy Mill Awareness’s new Sick Dog Checklist and Complaint Form.

Download (includes “go the extra mile”)

Online Version
Pam
Pamela01
Group Organizer
Clarkston, MI
Post #: 515
Also, The Humane Society of Huron Valley offers a free Behavior Helpline staffed by trained volunteers. Behavior Helpline 734-662-5545

Pam
Pamela01
Group Organizer
Clarkston, MI
Post #: 530
What to do if you purchase a sick puppy from a pet store

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE July 6, 2010
CONTACT: Lynne Schreiber (248) 376-0406


DETROIT —Picture this: your family has eagerly awaited the day when the kids will pick out a puppy and bring home your newest family member. You have names picked out, you buy all the toys, dog food and pet beds. Once home, though, you notice something’s just not quite right with your new pet. A visit to the vet reveals the worst: you bought a sick puppy. What to do?

For every sick puppy reported to the Local Animal Control or Better Business Bureau, there may be five others that go unreported. Some illnesses, such as Coccidia and Guardia – intestinal parasites, both - can be passed to humans, while Luxating Patella – a knee condition - is common and requires costly surgery.

The Puppy Mill Awareness Meetup has developed a guide for Michigan residents who unknowingly purchase a sick puppy from a pet store or breeder. A Complaint Form and Checklist can be viewed and downloaded here:

Complaint Form and Checklist
http://files.meetup.c...­

“Families first need to recognize that their new family member likely arrived sick from the breeder, and may have recourse against both the store and breeder,” says Pam Sordyl, Director of the Puppy Mill Awareness Michigan Meetup. “Southeast Michigan is home to approximately 36 puppy-selling pet stores, many of which ship sick puppies long distances from ‘mega mills’ and never disclose breeder information.”

The checklist guides consumers to the most important organizations overseeing breeders and pet stores, such as the Local Animal Control and the USDA. Most of the complaints can be filed online and the complaint form can be submitted to multiple organizations that track sick puppy purchases, such as the Humane Society of the United States and the Attorney General’s Office. There is even a local number to call for legal advice. The Michigan State Bar Animal Law Section's Animal Legal Lifeline can be reached at 866-211-6257.

Although there are presently no Michigan Puppy Lemon Laws to protect consumers, there are many things consumers can do, from filing complaints to spreading the word and educating consumers so this pattern eventually ceases.




Deb M.
DebMonroe
Pontiac, MI
Post #: 7
Also, The Humane Society of Huron Valley offers a free Behavior Helpline staffed by trained volunteers. Behavior Helpline 734-662-5545


The Michigan Humane Society also provides a Behavior Help Line. Follow this link to leave either a phone message (248.650.0127) or complete a form online at: http://www.michiganhu...­

Deb Monroe
Pam
Pamela01
Group Organizer
Clarkston, MI
Post #: 571
The Daily (Serving Southeastern Oakland County)

PET HEALTHY


Published: Sunday, July 25, 2010

By Maryanne Kocis MacLeod, Daily Tribune Staff Writer

Shortly after Jennifer Sitco of Macomb Township began considering recommendations to have her doe-eyed, 8-month-old Labrador retriever, Howard, put to sleep, the long-legged pup started climbing into her lap and placing his paw protectively on her shoulder.

"He'd never done that before," said Sitco, who has shelled out more than $2,000 on veterinary bills and special dog food since adopting the yellow Lab from a backyard breeder in November. "He snuggles right into you, trying to get as close as possible."

Shortly after Howard came home, the family vet noticed he wasn't gaining weight; then Howard began vomiting and defecating uncontrollably.

After much investigation, Sitco learned that Howard needed a liver shunt.

When she contacted the breeder — who would only accept cash when Howard was purchased — to share news of the puppy's genetic condition, Sitco was told she could get a replacement puppy from the next litter from Howard's mom.

That, according to Chris Osborne, of A True Blue Rescue, is not an appropriate response.

"A reputable breeder would be involved according to the contract signed with the buyer," Osborne explained. "Although responses vary, and may include getting one's money back, etc., at the very least, (the parent dogs) would not be mated again."



Daily Tribune staff photos by Craig Gaffield Animal advocate Chris Osborne and the Sitco family of Macomb Township — front from left, Belle, Osborne, Labrador retriever, Howard, Rocco and Jennifer, and in back, Wally — oppose puppy mills and backyard breeders..

Although Howard did come with "papers," Osborne said they did not illustrate his full blood line or relevant health problems contributing to his condition.

"Ultimately, this female (Howard's mom) needs to stop breeding," Osborne said. "Puppy mill or backyard breeder, neither follows the rules that promote healthy animals," she continued. "And buyers wind up paying top dollar for something they're not getting."

According to Pam Sordyl, Director of the Puppy Mill Awareness Meetup (Southeast Michigan), for every sick puppy reported to the local animal control or Better Business Bureau, up to five others go unreported. Some illnesses, such as coccidia and giardia — intestinal parasites — can be passed to humans, while luxating patella, a knee condition, is common and requires costly surgery to repair.

The Puppy Mill Awareness Meetup has developed a guide for Michigan residents who unwittingly purchase a sick puppy from a pet store or breeder. A complaint form and checklist are available at files.meetup.com/1258100/SickPuppyCheckl­istv8.doc.

"Families ... may have recourse against both the store and breeder," Sordyl said. "Southeast Michigan is home to approximately 36 puppy-selling pet stores, many of which ship sick puppies long distances from 'mega mills' and never disclose breeder information."

The checklist guides consumers to organizations such as the local animal control and the United States Department of Agriculture, which oversee breeders and pet stores.

Most complaints can be filed online and the complaint form submitted to multiple organizations that track sick puppy purchases, i.e. the Humane Society of the United States and the Attorney General's Office.

Locally, experts at the Michigan State Bar Animal Law Section's Animal Legal Lifeline can offer advice at (866) 211-6257.

Although no Michigan puppy lemon laws are in place to protect consumers, Sordyl said, buyers can do their part by filing complaints, spreading the word regarding the Meetup, and otherwise educating their fellow consumers.

Learn more about the Puppy Mill Awareness Meetup at www.meetup.com/detroit-puppy-mill-awaren­ess/about/ and/or puppy mills and pet stores at www.humanesociety.org/issues/puppy_mills­/

Jennifer Sitco, her husband, Walter, and their young children continue to hold out hope that Howard may recover.

Through Jennifer's perseverance, Osborne's support, connections and commitment to the cause, and the generosity of various local charities, a surgery date to repair Howard's damaged liver has been scheduled for mid-August.

If he does not require additional surgery — which is common — Howard's medical team at Michigan State University has given him an 80 percent chance of leading a normal life.

So far, however, the surgery has already been canceled twice; the first time because Howard was not strong enough to sustain surgery, the second time because of an equipment problem.

"Every time we go back to the drawing board, it means more uncertainty and more money for medication and special food," said Sitco, who has two children, ages 6 and 3, and an 11-year-old chocolate Lab named Mojo.

She also works as a waitress and takes classes at Macomb Community College.

"We never know when Howard is going to experience a setback or need new medication, which has happened several times. I'm so frustrated."

"But when I look at Howard, he's so happy and playful," she continued. "If he was in pain, that would be a different story. But I would hate to put him down for financial reasons. Ultimately, I just want him to lead a normal life."

http://www.dailytribu...­
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