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Re: [rlccef] FW: Tallahassee Legislative Update-Your Private Property Rights!

From: Laureen T.
Sent on: Wednesday, September 5, 2012 10:06 AM

And then we wonder why the housing crisis is not over and we have more demand then supply, and empty foreclosures  sitting being vandalized instead of being put on the market for repair and sale, instead are   being demolition or bought up by foreign investors in bulk through the Obama foreclosure to rental program, as more land diminishes for future  development . This puts mass amounts of independent  small businesses out of work  all the way from the independent construction workers  all the way to Realtors. Not only that it messes up the real estate Market. It's called  "Markets for a reason". 

Government is not only buying up "so called" conservation land they are sticking their noses in the real estate market since the bubble burst. We still do not have a true market. As the Government bails out wall street.  Then the banks  they bailed out are foreclosing on small business and homeowners while the the tycoons got a free pass . For example . an  office building that cost 450,000 in 2004 is now worth 159,000, then they foreclose on the amount of the original sale (from the purchase in the artificial market that the bubble burst).  Meanwhile they have all but halted the flow of the natural real estate free markets. The housing market effects every aspect of the economy. There are simple solutions to save small businesses and homeowners under water while still allowing the massive amount of vacant foreclosures to be put out into the real estate market. 

Brevard County has more  vacant foreclosures  off the market then on the market. Now The commercial bubble has began and soon many small independent businesses will lose "What they built"...  OK so" we build it " and the Gov't take it away , while they bail out the big wigs on wall street. The Theme sounds good but Government does not create business people do ! 

Local Gov't and homeowner associations think that they are penalizing the banks by adding excessive attorney fees onto late homeowner dues and over charging on everything from utilities to code violations. What Government does not seem to realize or care about it that most Realtors that manage these homes and get them ready for the market the vast majority of the time  Have to pay everyone from construction workers, to outstanding HOA bills , utilities, lawn maintenance, and code violations upfront and out of pocket and sometimes wait 60 days for reimbursement and that is if the bank does not go under. If the bank goes under all that is a loss . Our business alone has suffered over 1 million dollars in these loses of out of pocket expenses since 2005.

Local Government also has special privileges to buy homes and land  through grants and programs. Now please tell me why the government should be involved in the real estate market in such  a huge way  at all.?  We no longer have a free market system and as I speak the middle class is being whipped out and  the dream of sustaining and owning a small business or  home  is a dying American dream .  With the new Obama foreclosure to rental program we will now have more renters then homeowners .  Citizens that have been through a hardship and lost their homes or business because of circumstances beyond their control and a national housing crisis are not able to  get financing ,that's  above and beyond being able to find a job and even if they find a job they cannot quality because their credit is ruined.

Brevard County is now a Hub zone and grant money is following in like water and the local government finds it so easy to get all the grant money they want , CRA's etc, however for a person trying to open a small business or sustain the one they have find it almost impossible to be able to get a  grant , and their are grants available.  

So they  Beautify the libraries, the city halls,build  huge government buildings, more and more big big government   while citizens are using the newly built roads to get the hell out of Florida as fast as they can, because there is no work and no opportunity. Oh and lets not forget that they keep raising mileage rates to give government raises and pay for wasteful programs.

So there you have it citizens that can afford to buy a home can't because there  is more demand then supply (because of government intervention), and people that went through hardship and no longer have a job or can afford to keep their small business open have closed their doors or will be closing their doors and  either be renting on the Obama foreclosure to rental program or moving out of brevard county. 

 . As the county spends thousands of dollars on social programs . Our schools don't have better education they have more counselors because of the financial hardships families are facing, ( families should be responsible for their children the govt does not own our children, we are raising up a generation that believes they need the government to teach them how to be parents and along with that they are learning their morality from the public schools)  Parental rights are being diminished every day . So lets keep building bigger schools, hire more councilors , build more  parks, and implement more social programs ,  because the governments answer is more social programs, Use all that grant money to build more parks , because  the dying middle class can no longer afford  a swing set , pool, and play baseball with the neighborhood kids  in their own back yard .

Financial hardships produce more crime and physiological problems no doubt , but  the governments answer is build bigger jails and put everyone on medication and put you and your children on social programs. Granted some of these programs are needed for single moms that need a career and have to take care of their family while going through school and  Young adults need to go to college and bright futures is a great program, but there is much waste in other areas and traditional values are being thrown out the window. 

With the amount of money we allocate for education in the state of Florida I think some would be well spend allocating funds for vocational schools so when children graduate high school they already have learned a trade. The quality of the education of our children will determine whether they succeed or fail   While not all students are destined for College, all High School graduates MUST be prepared to begin a productive future. Legislative priorities should be adjusted to reevaluate the importance of technical, trade and/or vocational schools. This was on my campaign platform. Cheating on Fcats to earn higher school ratings and using them as a model for a child's future is a most ridiculous way to score students abilities and creativity for a prosperous future . Especially when they are not accurate. 

Our state is more concerned about the ratings of our schools then children's education and future in the real world .  Minnesota has the best schools in the nation, why have we not followed their example.?  What good has the Florida lottery money done for our education ? They bilk that fund also, just like they bilk the  Sadowski fund (monies collected from doc stamps on the deed when you buy a home). That's right in 2012 $8.4 million was given to for Florida Forever and $30 million of Everglades restoration. The Sadowski Affordable Housing Act Trust Fund was swept . Talk about agenda 21 in our own back yard. We don't even own the Florida everglades The Everglades like most national parks and environmental sites are under the World Heritage Centre under UNESCO under the United Nations. 
Great read by kirsann hall if you have not read it yet 
...
 

A prosperous society were parents have jobs and are in control of their family we would not have these problems. 

There are e-z and simple solutions to these problems,  but government intervention just keeps getting int he way .  Demographics are changing, jobs losses and small businesses are going under, children are under the rule of school counselors and social programs, and massive amounts of adults are on medication. and teaching of morality and what is in the best interest of your children is under  assault .  This is what is happening in the real world.

I strongly suggest if grassroots wants to help with the November election to start a campaign to Vote Yes on Amendment 4.  Does anyone even know what amendment 4 is?  I am not about amending the constitution but its been amended so many times with bad laws, maybe its time to pass an amendment to stop out of control government.  We have all pleaded and begged at public meetings to no avail only to be swept aside. The commissioners are getting so use to the complaints they have just become numb to them and don't care. Its just part of the agenda now. I wonder if they think to themselves "Ok 50 citizens will be in to complain today oh boy I have to sit for 8 hours and listen to them piss and moan before we can get moving on the agenda we want to pass. "

I wanted to add to this update on property rights that  a  directive by the governor  was implemented that  basically allows  local government to  sell off much " so called conservation land" , but they are not allowed to use the proceeds for budget short falls. Keep an eye on that . They are already having meetings locally to implement this program and the citizens should show up to all public meetings. 

This year I believe there are  9-12 constitutional amendments that will be  on  November's ballot . Some are good some are bad. 

Below is a brief summary  of amendment 4 , like I said I am not a fan amending the constitution, but I am in favor of this amendment. Its pretty bad when a constitutional amendment is the last and only resort to stop local government from raising mileage rates, control  stop runaway taxation of our small business , over taxing and excessive fees on rents  and excessive fees that benefit the large national corporations and hurt  our small hotels /motel and cripple local  tourism.  To raise mileage rates rather then find solutions to cut the budget is oxymoron to a hurting real estate market and only creates more of an artificial market .

Attached is the state directive by governor Scott on procedures on how conservation land should be sold off . also I attached   two pdf's  I hope they go through as an attachment if not I will try to edit copy and edit paste in a separate email. 

Also below is a brief summary of amendment 4 which will be on the ballot in November. If anyone has any  questions about the constitutional amendments or any of the over 200 bills passed in 2012  .  I will be glad to send you a summary. I spent a good part of my 12 month campaign studying these laws. 


brief  Summary   

CS/CS/CS/CS/CS/HJR 381 – Constitutional Amendment that passed during the 2011 
PROPERTY TAX LIMITATIONS; PROPERTY VALUE DECLINE; REDUCTION FOR NONHOMESTEAD ASSESSMENT INCREASES; DELAY OF SCHEDULED REPEAL.

Non-Homestead Assessment Limitation Reduces the annual growth in assessment limitation on certain non-homestead property from 10 percent to five percent upon voter approval of a constitutionalamendment. The January 1, 2019, sunset of the non-homestead assessment limitation is delayed until 2023.


Prohibition of Increases in Assessed Value Where Market Value Has Declined Allows the Legislature by general law to prohibit increases in the assessed value of homestead property and certain non-homestead property in any year where the market value of the property decreases. 

If created by general law, this provision would prevent what is commonly referred to as “recapture” in any year where the market value of a property decreases. If approved by the voters with the 2012 general election, they will take effect on January 1, 2013.


 Additional Homestead Exemption for “First-Time” Homesteaders Additionally, this measure proposes to allow individuals who are entitled to a homestead exemption. 
(exemption is reduced each year zero to five years or less )

S.6(a), Art. VII of the State Constitution, and have not received a homestead exemption in the previous three years to receive an additional homestead exemption equal to 50 percent of the homestead property’s just value not to exceed the median just value for homestead property in the county where the property at issue is located. This exemption applies only to non-school property taxes. 

The exemption is reduced 20 percent each year and diminishes to zero in five years or less.


 If approved by the voters with the 2012 general election, the provision takes effect on January 1, 2013, and is available for properties purchased on or after January 1, 2012. (Taxes are in arrears)


Ballot language  unless changed  November 2012


CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT ARTICLE VII, SECTIONS 4, 6 ARTICLE XII, SECTIONS 27, 32, 33

PROPERTY TAX LIMITATIONS; PROPERTY VALUE DECLINE; RE- DUCTION FOR NONHOMESTEAD ASSESSMENT INCREASES; DELAY OF SCHEDULED REPEAL.—

(1) This would amend Florida Constitution Article VII, Section 4 (Taxation; assessments) and Section 6 (Homestead exemptions). It also would amend Article XII, Section 27, and add Sections 32 and 33, relating to the Schedule for the amendments.

(2) In certain circumstances, the law requires the assessed value of homestead and specified nonhomestead property to increase when the just value of the property decreases. Therefore, this amendmentprovides that the Legislature may, by general law, provide that the assessment of homestead and specified nonhomestead property may not increase if the just value of that property is less than the just value of the property on the preceding January 1, subject to any adjustment in the assessed value due to changes, additions, reductions, or improvements to such property which are assessed as provided for by general law. This amendment takes effect upon approval by the voters. If approved at a special election held on the date of the 2012 presidential preference primary, it shall operate retroactively to January 1, 2012, or, if approved at the 2012 general election, shall take effect January 1, 2013.

(3) This amendment reduces from 10 percent to 5 percent the limitation on annual changes in assessments of nonhomestead real property. This amendment takes effect upon approval of the voters. If approved at a special election held on the date of the 2012 presidential preference primary, it shall operate retroactively to January 1, 2012, or, if approved at the 2012 general election, takes effect January 1, 2013.

(4) This amendment also authorizes general law to provide, subject to conditions specified in such law, an additional homestead exemption to every person who establishes the right to receive the homestead exemption provided in the Florida Constitution within 1 year after purchasing the homestead property and who has not owned property in the previous 3 calendar years to which the Florida homestead exemption applied. The additional homestead exemption shall apply to all levies except school district levies. The additional exemption is an amount equal to 50 percent of the homestead property’s just value on January 1 of the year the homestead is established. 

The additional homestead exemption may not exceed an amount equal to the median just value of all homestead property within the county where the property at issue is located for the calendar year immediately preceding January 1 of the year the homestead is established. The additional exemption shall apply for the shorter of 5years or the year of sale of the property. The amount of the additional exemption shall be reduced in each subsequent year by an amount equal to 20 percent of the amount of the additional exemption received in the year the homestead was established or by an amount equal to the difference between the just value of the property and the assessed value of the property determined under Article VII, Section 4(d), whichever is greater. 

Not more than one such exemption shall be allowed per homestead property at one time. The additional exemption applies to property purchased on or after January 1, 2011, if approved by the voters at a special election held on the date of the 2012 presidential preference primary, or to property purchased on or after January 1, 2012, If approved by the voters at the 2012 general election. The additional exemption is not available in the sixth and subsequent years after it is first received. The amendment shall take effect upon approval by the voters. If approved at a special election held on the date of the 2012 presidential preference primary, it shall operate retroactively to January 1, 2012, or, if approved at the 2012 general election, takes effect January 1, 2013.


(5) This amendment also delays until 2023, the repeal, currently scheduled to take effect in 2019, of constitutional amendmentsadopted in 2008 which limit annual assessment increases for specified nonhomestead real property. This amendment delays until 2022 the submission of an amendment proposing the abrogation of such repeal to the voters.




Link to governor's directive on land acquisition 

http://www.dep.state.fl.us/secretary/watman/files/001_govs_direction_041411.pdf

On Wed, Sep 5, 2012 at 9:40 AM, Laureen Trent <[address removed]> wrote:

uidelines􏰀for􏰀DEP’s􏰀Review􏰀of􏰀WMDs􏰀Land􏰀Acquisition􏰀/􏰀Surplus􏰀/􏰀Exchange􏰀Proposals􏰀

FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION Guidelines for DEP’s Review of Florida’s Water Management Districts Land Acquisition / Surplus / Exchange

Florida’s economy and environment depend on the health of our water bodies. This is why a top priority of the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) is getting Florida’s water right. Governor Scott directed DEP to work with the water management districts to develop clear, coherent and consistent statewide policies that will allow us to better protect Florida’s water resources.

An important part of protecting Florida’s natural resources is acquiring and managing public lands. Effective land management requires continuous review and examination to make sure the management of a property is on target, effective and meets the core mission of the agency. DEP and other state agencies regularly undergo a review process required by Florida Statutes to help determine the lands the state needs to acquire, what land it already owns, and how that land is most appropriately managed. See §§[masked],[masked],[masked],[masked],[masked],[masked],[masked],[masked],[masked],[masked],[masked],[masked],[masked], and[masked], Florida Statutes.

When looking at land management and potential acquisitions, just as is done when prioritizing any water management projects, the water management districts should focus on their core mission of water supply, water quality, flood control and natural resource protection.

FDEP developed the process provided in this memo after consultation and collaboration with each of the water management districts. It is critical to adhere to the criteria listed below when making land acquisition or disposition decisions, and follow the appropriate review process.

The Division of State Lands will provide a monthly report of all water management district land transactions approved or denied to the Deputy Secretary of Land and Recreation, the Deputy Secretary of Water Policy and Ecosystem Restoration, and the Secretary.

LAND ACQUISITION

Criteria

  • 􏰂  All proposed land acquisitions should benefit the districts’ core mission activities.
    More specifically, the districts’ proposed land acquisitions should achieve at least one of the core

    mission listed above. The significance of the property to the core mission must be justified.

  • 􏰂  In general, the districts should try to achieve the following when acquiring land:

    Purchase of less-than-fee land interests.
    Purchase at less than 90% of the appraised value. The “appraised value” shall be equivalent to

    the maximum amount that may be paid by the district for a parcel to be acquired as determined

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Note: In general, the review process will take approximately two weeks. However, if it involves water policy issues that require additional review and opinion, please allow an additional week.

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Guidelines􏰀for􏰀DEP’s􏰀Review􏰀of􏰀WMDs􏰀Land􏰀Acquisition􏰀/􏰀Surplus􏰀/􏰀Exchange􏰀Proposals􏰀

using the procedures in §[masked], F.A.C., or other procedures that have been officially

approved by the Director of DEP’s Division of State Lands. Seek partnerships, with the goal of 50/50 split.

Review Process

The following review process is established based on the anticipated purchase price:

  • 􏰂  For acquisitions that do not exceed $500,000 and that are to be acquired at or less than 90% of the appraised value: (NOTE: If acquisition is over 90% of appraised value, use the guidelines for $500,000 up to $1 million.). Note that a collection of smaller purchases of adjoining land occurring within a year should be treated as a single purchase for purposes of applying these guidelines.

    1. The district has the authority to proceed to conduct acquisitions based on its Governing Board’s approval without DEP action.

    2. The district will submit the following to DEP’s Division of State Lands, Office of Environmental Services (OES), for documentation of the transaction:

      1. a cover letter signed by the Executive Director that includes: (i) a summary of the

        acquisition; (ii) a description of why the land is needed for core mission purposes; and (iii) either a statement verifying that Governing Board members, district employees or their relatives will not personally benefit from the transaction,􏰀or a description of the conflict of interest and an affidavit declaring that the conflicting party will not be involved in the negotiations;

      2. a completed Request to Acquire Lands for Water Management Purposes For Acquisitions Anticipated Not to Exceed $1,000,000;

      3. maps showing location and aerial views of the acquisition.

    3. If anything in the supporting documents appears abnormal or questionable, the Division of State Lands will contact the district for additional information within 14 days.

  • 􏰂  For acquisitions ranging between $500,000 up to $1 million or those that do not exceed $500,000 but are to be acquired at above 90% of the appraised value:

1. The district submits to DEP’s Division of State Lands, OES for review:

  1. a cover letter signed by the Executive Director that includes: (i) a summary of the

    acquisition; (ii) a description of why the land is needed for core mission purposes; and (iii) a statement verifying that Governing Board members, district employees or their relatives will not personally benefit from the transaction, or a description of the conflict of interest and an affidavit declaring that the conflicting party will not be involved in the negotiations;

  2. a completed Request to Acquire Lands for Water Management Purposes For Acquisitions Anticipated Not to Exceed $1,000,000;

  3. maps showing location and aerial views of the proposed acquisition.

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  1. The Division of State Lands will conduct a review of the proposed acquisition and provide the Deputy Secretary for Land and Recreation its recommendation.

  2. The Deputy Secretary for Land and Recreation will make the recommendation to approve or deny the request to the Secretary and the Deputy Secretary of Water Policy and Ecosystem Restoration.

  3. The Division of State Lands will notify the district of the decision.

  • 􏰂  For acquisitions that exceed $1 million:

    1. The district submits to DEP’s Division of State Lands, OES:

      1. a cover letter signed by the Executive Director that includes: (i) a summary of the

        acquisition; (ii) a description of why the land is needed for core mission purposes; and (iii) a statement verifying that Governing Board members, district employees or their relatives will not personally benefit from the transaction, or a description of the conflict of interest and an affidavit declaring that the conflicting party will not be involved in the negotiations;

      2. a completed Request to Acquire Lands for Water Management Purposes Anticipated to Exceed $1,000,000;

      3. maps showing location and aerial views of the proposed acquisition.

    2. The Division of State Lands will conduct a review of the proposed acquisition and provide the Deputy Secretary for Land and Recreation its recommendation.

    3. The Deputy Secretary for Land and Recreation will make the recommendation to approve or deny the request to the Secretary and the Deputy Secretary of Water Policy and Ecosystem Restoration.

    4. The Division of State Lands will notify the district of the decision.

  • 􏰂  For acquisitions occurring by inverse condemnation:

    1. The district submits to DEP’s Division of State Lands, OES, before filing the inverse condemnation action:

    1. a cover letter signed by the Executive Director that includes: (i) a summary of the

      anticipated acquisition, including any publicly-available assessment of the property’s value; (ii) a description of why the land is needed for core mission purposes; and (iii) a statement verifying that Governing Board members, district employees or their relatives will not personally benefit from the transaction, or a description of the conflict of interest and an affidavit declaring that the conflicting party will not be involved in the negotiations; and

    2. maps showing location and aerial views of the proposed acquisition.

    2. The Division of State Lands will conduct a review of the proposed inverse condemnation action and provide the Deputy Secretary for Land and Recreation its recommendation.

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Guidelines􏰀for􏰀DEP’s􏰀Review􏰀of􏰀WMDs􏰀Land􏰀Acquisition􏰀/􏰀Surplus􏰀/􏰀Exchange􏰀Proposals􏰀

  1. The Deputy Secretary for Land and Recreation will make the recommendation to approve or deny the request to the Secretary and the Deputy Secretary of Water Policy and Ecosystem Restoration.

  2. The Division of State Lands will notify the district of the decision and the district may proceed with the inverse condemnation action.

  3. At the conclusion of the inverse condemnation action, the district shall notify OES by letter of the outcome, to include the price paid by the district for the parcel(s) and the payment of any attorney’s fees, costs or other fees paid to the landowner.

LAND SURPLUS

Criteria

  • 􏰂  Land the district no longer needs to achieve its core mission may be considered for surplus or exchange if it can be determined that land is no longer needed for conservation purposes.

  • 􏰂  The districts should carefully review and examine these properties, giving consideration to avoiding the elimination of significant landscape linkages or conservation corridors, natural or cultural resources, and public recreational opportunities, as well as complying with the no-net-loss of hunting land statute.

    Review Process

􏰂 For all surplus land requests:

  1. The district submits to DEP’s Division of State Lands, OES:

    1. a cover letter signed by the Executive Director that includes: (i) a summary of the

      disposition; (ii) a description of why the land is no longer needed for core mission purposes; and (iii) a statement verifying that: (a) Governing Board members, district employees or their relatives will not personally benefit from the transaction; (b) a description of the conflict of interest and an affidavit declaring that the conflicting party will not be involved in the negotiations; or (c) a statement that the District disposed of the land by sealed competitive bids;

    2. a completed Request to Surplus or Exchange District Lands Form;

    3. a DRAFT of the Resolution the district proposes to present to the Governing Board that

      declares the land is no longer needed for the purpose(s) for which it was acquired;

    4. maps showing location and aerial views of the proposed land to be surplused.

  2. The Division of State Lands conducts a review of the land proposed for surplus, verifying that:

    1. the property is not a critical natural or cultural resource, or part of a landscape linkage or

      conservation corridor;

    2. disposing of the property will have minimal impact on public access or use, including no-net-

      loss of hunting land.

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  1. The Division of State Lands will provide its analysis to the Deputy Secretary for Land and Recreation who will make a recommendation to the Secretary and the Deputy Secretary of Water Policy and Ecosystem Restoration.

  2. The Division of State Lands will notify the district of DEP’s decision.

LAND EXCHANGE

Criteria

  • 􏰂  Whenever possible, the district should first attempt to use land exchanges to obtain lands needed to achieve their core missions.

  • 􏰂  Land exchanges should result in the districts receiving overall equal or greater water resource protection and economic values.

    Review Process

􏰂 For all land exchange requests:

  1. The district submits to DEP’s Division of State Lands, OES:

    1. a cover letter signed by the Executive Director that includes: (i) a summary of the exchange

      describing both the district lands being disposed and the private land being acquired; (ii) a description of why the land being disposed is no longer needed for core mission purposes; and (iii) a statement verifying that Governing Board members, district employees or their relatives will not personally benefit from the transaction, or a description of the conflict of interest and an affidavit declaring that the conflicting party will not be involved in the negotiations;

    2. a completed Request to Surplus or Exchange District Lands Form for the district property being exchanged, as well as the appropriate completed Request to Acquire Lands for Water Management Purposes Form for the property to be acquired;

    3. maps showing location and aerial views of the proposed land to be exchanged and the land to be acquired.

  2. The Division of State Lands conducts a review of the lands proposed for exchange and provides this analysis and a recommendation to the Deputy Secretary for Land and Recreation.

  3. The Deputy Secretary for Land and Recreation will make the decision to approve or deny the exchange and will notify the Secretary and the Deputy Secretary of Water Policy and Ecosystem Restoration.

  4. The Division of State Lands will notify the district of DEP’s decision.

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Pre􏰁Surplus*

WMD staff submits request to OES

•Completes Surplus Request Form •Cover letter signed by Exec. Dir.

summarizing the proposed surplus/

exchange
•Provides maps showing location and

aerial of proposed surplus
• Draft Resolution describing the parcel is

no longer needed for conservation

purposes
•Statement verifying no personal benefit

from the transaction by board members, district employees or their relatives

OES review

•Not a critical linkage or conservation corridor

•No critical natural or cultural resources •No significant impact on public access or

use - no-net-loss of hunting land
•No personal benefit by board or district

staff or their families

Deputy Secretary of Land and Recreation

approves or denies request, and notifies Secretary, Deputy Secretary of Water Policy and Ecosystem Restoration and OES

OES notifies WMD of DEP's decision

If approved by DEP, WMD Governing Board decides whether to proceed with surplus or exchange

Pre􏰁Acquisition

WMD submits request to OES

•Completes appropriate Acquisition Request Form •Cover letter signed by Exec. Dir. describing why

needed for core water mangement purposes •Provides maps showing location and aerial of

proposed acquisition
•Statement verifying no personal benefit from the

transaction by board members, district employees or their relatives

If anticipated cost 􏰃$500,000 and <90% of appraised value, and meets core WMD mission, WMD is given authority to acquire property with the Governing Board's approval without DEP action.

OES review

•Meets core mission for water resource protection, development, supply, restoration or aquifer recharge

•No personal benefit by board or district staff or their families

If anticipated cost >$500,000 and <90% of appraised value (or <$500,00 but 􏰄90% of appraised value), DSL makes recommendation to Deputy Secretary of Land and Recreation

If anticipated cost >$500,000 (or <$500,00 but 􏰄90% of appraised value), Deputy Secretary of Land and Recreation approves or denies request, and notifies Secretary, Deputy Secretary of Water Policy and Ecosystem Restoration and OES

OES notifies WMD of DEP's decision

If approved by DEP, WMD Governing Board, decides whether to proceed with acquisition

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* Exchanges will follow the Surplus Process, but must include information, affidavits and completed forms for both the district’s land being disposed and the new land being acquired in the exchange.





On Tue, Sep 4, 2012 at 4:31 PM, Bob White <[address removed]> wrote:



Subject: Tallahassee Legislative Update-Your Private Property Rights!
From: [address removed]
To: [address removed]
Date: Tue, 4 Sep[masked]:06:24 +0000

JOHN HALLMAN'S LEGISLATIVE UPDATE
                                                            Twitter Facebook MySpace Digg StumbleUpon Delicious



"It is the duty and responsibility of the Florida legislature to protect its citizens from the federal government exceeding their constitutionally limited power and imposing mandates that threaten our liberty and freedom guaranteed in the constitution. "
John Hallman
 
Dear Bob,
 
If you missed my last Tallahassee Legislative Update, please click here!
 
Agenda 21 Update: Private Property Rights under assault in Florida!
 
Currently, federal, state and local government own 9.9 million acres of land in Florida—that’s almost one third of the Sunshine State.  Now, environmental groups have launched a petition campaign for a proposed state constitutional amendment that would earmark $10 billion in taxpayer dollars over 20 years for more land acquisitions and regulations.  I believe environmental extremists view private property owners as enemies of the state. That’s Socialism 101 in practice.
 
The United Nation’s Agenda 21 schemes threaten our Constitutional rights. We must fight back. 
 
I’m writing today to let you know that I am cautiously optimistic that we have a chance in the next state legislative session to preserve private property rights in Florida.  Incoming Florida Senate President Don Gaetz announced on a Fort Walton radio station:
“Personally, I oppose anybody or anything that tramples on the United States sovereignty. And property rights are a pretty strong topic in the Florida Legislature … Expect a bill that shelters private property in Florida from takeover by a United Nations-led world government effort.”
 
Senator Gaetz went onto say that he expects Florida Lawmakers to introduce a bill similar to Alabama’s Senate Bill 477 that has signed into law by their Governor.  Note that Senator Gaetz said he thinks there is a good chance such a bill will come up in the next session and that he expects that bill to receive favorable support.
 
The Alabama legislation reads in part, “The State of Alabama and all political subdivisions may not adopt or implement policy recommendations that deliberately or inadvertently infringe or restrict private property rights without due process, as may be required by policy recommendations originating in, or traceable to ‘Agenda 21.’”  The law includes a brief background on the UN plan hatched at the 1992 “Earth Summit” in Rio de Janeiro. 
 
The people of Alabama acting through their elected representatives — not UN bureaucrats — have the authority to develop the state’s environmental and development policies, the official synopsis of the law explains.  Therefore, infringements on the property rights of citizens linked to “any other international law or ancillary plan of action that contravenes the Constitution of the United States or the Constitution of the State of Alabama” are also prohibited under the new measure.
 
Although I am enthusiastic about Senator Gaetz’ interest, I have learned to not depend on election year promises made by politicians, even well meaning ones … We have been burned too many times.  It is going to be up to us to make this happen. That is why we need to keep the pressure on Senator Gaetz to make sure this bill is filed.  Senator Gaetz will be feeling the heat from powerful special interests that are opposed to private property rights. Even if an Alabama-style bill is filed, there will be attempts to water down this bill until it becomes meaningless.
 
TAKE ACTION
Please call Senator Don Gaetz and ask him to use his leadership position to advance this Alabama-style bill to protect private property rights in the next session. Call Senator Gaetz at his district office:  (850)[masked].

   
Primary election results and the Florida Legislature
 
I think one of the biggest problems in politics is the power of incumbency. Special interest influence, via lobbyists and a spider web of funding networks, keep politicians in their pockets and ensure they are re-elected.  In the past 10 years, according to an examination of state records, only 10 of 505 incumbent lawmakers — less than two percent — have been defeated in bids for re-election.  That works out to be an astonishing re-election rate of 98.9 percent for state senators and 97.8 percent for House members.  I can assure you that among those safe incumbents we have very little support for liberty-enhancing legislation.
 
This election year (2012), there will be 32 incumbent legislators who will be back in Tallahassee who didn’t even face an opposition candidate.  They simply filed for re-election without any opposition.  Once politicians feel secure they will stay in office, they really have no motivation to be responsive to their constituent’s needs. 
 
That is why I am excited to be involved with Liberty Candidate Resource Center and their “Liberty Takeover 2012” plan.  Our goal is to take on the special interest and their hand-picked candidates and level the playing field that will allow real Liberty-minded candidates the resources they need to get elected.  Liberty Candidate Resource Center and our supported candidates made great progress against the special interest in the recent primary election. Please read this report on our primary election success. Primary Election Numbers are in - Liberty WON!

 
Grassroots Lobbying tip of the week
 
One of the most important things we need to always do is to get politicians on record, and usually the best way is by their voting record.  I always try to force a roll call vote, either in committees or on the floor.  The problem is that politicians will do everything they can to avoid being on the record.  Politicians are ruled by ambition and values are subordinated to their ambition.  One of the techniques I use to get politicians on record is a public statement they’ve made either to the press or at a public meeting.  A great example of this is Senator Don Gaetz I mentioned above in the Agenda 21 Update.  We now have Senator Don Gaetz on record supporting a bill to protect private property rights.  We must continually remind Senator Gaetz of his pledge to see this bill filed and supported.  Please call Senator Gaetz right now at (850)[masked] and remind him of his pledge to defend our private property rights. 

If you know anyone who would be interested in recieving these emails please forward them this link http://johnhallman.us5.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=85e6877146ca8bd1caf2f0bdd&id=6320fdddcc to get my updates.
 
With thanks for all you do, I remain yours in the cause of Liberty,
 
John

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Copyright © 2012 John Hallman, All rights reserved.
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