• SeaJUG Office Hours

    Logic20/20 Inc

    Have questions about Java? Need help with a project or want a second set of eyes to dig into that tricky issue you’ve been facing? Or are you a total newbie interested in learning Java and don't know where to start? Come hang out with fellow SeaJUG members at Java Office Hours! SeaJUG Office Hours will be hosted once a month in the evening from 6:00-8:00pm. Each Office Hours session will feature volunteer mentors to help answer questions and provide feedback. SeaJUG Office Hours are based upon CJUG (https://www.meetup.com/ChicagoJUG) Office Hours and follow a similar 'coffee and code' style designed to connect people to work on personal projects, provide code reviews, answer questions, and just hang out. This is an open format so feel free to come and go as you please. FAQ: When/Where will office hours be hosted? - SeaJUG Office Hours will be scheduled on a monthly basis and last from 6:00 - 8:00pm. This will be an open format so come and go as you please. Who should attend? - anyone who would like a code review - anyone who would like help with a coding issue - anyone who would like to collaborate on a project - anyone interested in java related technologies - anyone who just wants to hang out I’m interested in becoming an Office Hours Aide. What do I do? - Thanks for volunteering! Please contact Sam at [masked] and introduce yourself. What should I bring? - A laptop and your questions/code/project/friend! Location: Logic 20/[masked] First Ave. S. Suite 310 Seattle, WA 98134 Finding Us: • Please enter through the front revolving door beneath the “1501” as it will stay unlocked and be your best point of entry. • Take the elevators on your right to the 3rd floor. Someone will be there to swipe their badge and give you access to use the elevator. If no one is there, please visit the security desk for help. • If you arrive after 6:30, please send a message to Sam [masked]) and someone will come meet you. Parking: • Street parking is available on the streets parallel to Logic20/20’s building - Paid street parking and marked time limits end at 6pm. • There is a covered garage attached to Home Plate Center with paid parking options. You will be able to exit the garage, regardless of time, as long as you have your ticket and pay at one of the kiosks.

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  • Effective Docker and Kubernetes for Java EE Developers

    There are several key trade-offs to consider while using Docker and Kubernetes with Java EE applications. Examples include: 1) Whether to use thin WARs, fat JARs, or hollow uber-JARs to effectively work with Docker repositories, layering, and caching. 2) Whether to deploy applications within images, through exposed admin ports or as autodeployed mounted external volumes. 3) How Docker networking and Kubernetes cluster deployments align with application server administration, clustering, auto-discovery, and load-balancing. 4) How the CI/CD pipeline of your application can be adapted to Docker and Kubernetes. This entirely slide-less, fast-paced, demo-driven session walks through each of these considerations. SPEAKER: Reza Rehman, Senior Java Technologist, Author, Speaker Reza Rahman is Principal Program Manager for Java on Azure at Microsoft. He works to make sure Java developers are first class citizens at Microsoft and Microsoft is a first class citizen of the Java ecosystem. Reza has been an official Java technologist at Oracle. He is the author of the popular book EJB 3 in Action. Reza has long been a frequent speaker at Java User Groups and conferences worldwide including JavaOne and Devoxx. He has been the lead for the Java EE track at JavaOne as well as a JavaOne Rock Star Speaker award recipient. Reza is an avid contributor to industry journals like JavaLobby/DZone and TheServerSide. He has been a member of the Java EE, EJB and JMS expert groups over the years. Reza implemented the EJB container for the Resin open source Java EE application server. He helps lead the Philadelphia Java User Group. Reza has over a decade of experience with technology leadership, enterprise architecture and consulting. He has been working with Java EE technology since its inception, developing on almost every major application platform ranging from Tomcat to JBoss, GlassFish, WebSphere and WebLogic. Reza has developed enterprise systems for well-known companies like eBay, Motorola, Comcast, Nokia, Prudential, Guardian Life, USAA, Independence Blue Cross, Anthem, CapitalOne and AAA using Java EE and Spring.

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  • The Future of Java and You && Cloud-native event-driven arch with Spring + Azure

    1] The Future of Java and You This session will explore how Java development has been brought into the open over the past decade. Several Java developer efforts have brought open source development processes and new levels of transparency and participation into their communities. The Java Community Process (JCP) program celebrates twenty years of Java standards development in 2018. Since the initiation of efforts to expand the developer participation in the Java community, Java standards development is more open than it ever has been. Learn how to take part in the Java developer community and the upcoming changes to the Java platform – you can participate as an individual, corporation, or nonprofit such as a Java user group (JUG). This session answers questions about why and how to participate in the evolution of the Java platform. You will also learn about the global Adoption programs and how you can participate in contributing to the future of Java. presented by Heather VanCura Chairperson and Director, Java Community Process Program Heather VanCura chairs the JCP Community and Program Office. In her role she is responsible for the leadership of the community. In this role she also is an international speaker, mentor and leader or hack days. Heather oversees the JCP.org web site, JSR management, community building, events, marketing, communications, and growth of the membership. She is also a contributor and leader of the community driven Adopt-a-JSR programs. In 2014, Heather became Spec Lead for JSR 364, Broadening JCP Membership, as part of the ongoing JCP.Next effort. Heather is passionate about Java and developer communities. She enjoys trying new sports and fitness activities in her free time 2] Cloud-native event-driven architecture with Spring and Azure What can you do with serverless systems in the cloud? Plenty, and you can do it at great speed with the cloud-scale. In the session, you’ll learn about the role of serverless technology, the importance of event processing and event-driven architectures for Java developers. Starting with a Spring Cloud Stream and Spring Cloud Function overview, we will show you how Apache Kafka, Pivotal Cloud Foundry, Azure Event Hubs, Azure Functions and Cosmos DB can be used in an event-driven architecture. Followed by this discussion, we will show a live-demo of a solution-architecture that collect data from globally distributed sources, processes the data in real-time in order to derive near-real-time insights. If you want to learn how to build and deliver modern responsive streaming applications at cloud-scale, this session is for you. Don’t miss it! Asir Selvasingh | Principal PM Architect | Microsoft – Java on Azure Asir started his software engineering career in the early days of Java, in 1995, and built enterprise products, applications and open source projects for many years. Now, he is a Principal PM Architect at Microsoft focusing on a full gamut of services and tools for developers to build and scale Java workloads on Azure. He works closely with the community, delivering sessions at Java conferences and fostering strategic relations that enriches the Java ecosystem. In his free-time, Asir loves to tinker with Java apps on Azure, which serves as a creative outlet from his day job. He’s passionate about cooking and photography and enjoys quality family time traveling the world. Richard Seroter | VP of Product Marketing | Pivotal Richard Seroter is the VP of Product Marketing at Pivotal, with a master's degree in Engineering from the University of Colorado. He's also an 11-time Microsoft MVP, trainer for developer-centric training company Pluralsight, speaker, the lead InfoQ editor for cloud computing, and author of multiple books on application integration strategies. Richard maintains a regularly updated blog on topics of architecture and solution design and can be found on Twitter as @rseroter

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  • SeaJUG Office Hours

    Code Fellows

    Have questions about Java? Have a project you'd like to work on? Need a second set of eyes to help debug? Come hang out with fellow SeaJUG members and get answers to your Java questions, help debugging tricky code, and some motivation to work on a personal project! SeaJUG Office Hours will be hosted once a month in the evening from 6:00-9:00pm. Each Office Hours session will feature a volunteer Aide and/or Mentor to help answer questions and provide feedback. SeaJUG Office Hours are based upon CJUG (https://www.meetup.com/ChicagoJUG) Office Hours and follow a similar 'coffee and code' style designed to connect people to work on personal projects, provide code reviews, answer questions, and just hang out. This is an open format so feel free to come and go as you please. FAQ: When/Where will office hours be hosted? - SeaJUG Office Hours will be scheduled on a monthly basis and last from 6:00 - 9:00pm. This will be an open format so come and go as you please. Who should attend? - anyone who would like a code review - anyone who would like help with a coding issue - anyone who would like to collaborate on a project - anyone interested in java related technologies - anyone who just wants to hang out I’m interested in becoming an Office Hours Aide. What do I do? - Thanks for volunteering! Please contact Sam at [masked] and introduce yourself. What should I bring? - A laptop and your questions/code/project/friend! Location: Katherine G. Johnson Event Space Parking: There is on-site parking, street parking, and ample public transportation options Bike parking is available on level 'UP' in the parking garage below the building. Garage access via the northwest corner of 2nd and Broad. Please supply your own lock.

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  • Gil Tene Presents: Java at speed - getting the most out of modern deployments

    The notion of "speed" in modern deployments can be challenging and multifaceted. Running fast, Deploying fast, Starting fast, and Staying fast are somewhat unrelated manifestations of an attribute we might call "speed". We obviously don't like seeing the opposite of any of those, but understanding the things that contribute to each behavior can help spend our time where it matters. In this talk, we will cover the different aspects of speed and dive into the details of each. We will deep dive into examples of optimizations that the latest crop of JVMs are able to apply when running on the latest servers and cloud hardware. We will discuss JIT compilers and other runtime features, and the interplay the they introduce between different aspect of speed. We will touch on the impact of various aspects of speed on service and application behavior and experience, and on some of the metrics that one might focus on when gauging the impact of rolling out software onto modern deployment environments, or when looking to improve or optimize outcomes in such setups. Bio Gil Tene is CTO and co-founder of Azul Systems. He has been involved with virtual machine and runtime technologies for the past 25 years. His pet focus areas include system responsiveness and latency behavior. Gil is a frequent speaker at technology conferences worldwide, and an official JavaOne Rock Star. He pioneered the Continuously Concurrent Compacting Collector (C4) that powers Azul's continuously reactive Java platforms. In past lives, he also designed and built operating systems, network switches, firewalls, and laser based mosquito interception systems. A BIG THANK YOU to Azul Systems for sponsoring food and drinks!

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  • Everyone Presents: Lightning Talks!

    Disney

    CURRENT LINE-UP OF TALKS: Event Sourcing by Eric Jain Docker and the JVM by Jonatan Ivanov Lombok by Sam Berk Implementing a process plug-in for Consul by Konstantin Ignatyev Cool things on Spring by Evan Raynolds Come and join us for Lightning Talks on this Meetup, where we talk between 5 ~ 10 minutes on a variety of topics! It's like a smorgasbord for Java! What would be even better? If you actually come and present! We are looking for more lightning talk topics and presenters so reach out to us [masked]. For those who don't know, Lightning talks is a great way to enter the world of public speaking. It's only 5 minutes, on any topic that you like... You think you don't have anything interesting to talk about? That's not true! What you might see as mundane, or boring (lombok, serialization, string encoding) others might not even know how to go about it! (What's serialization good for? should I just use lombok for everything?). No restriction on the format! Want to use powerpoint, go ahead! Prefer just to talk without slides. That's great!, or you like hand puppets? Well, you wouldn't be the first one who has done that (https://www.flickr.com/photos/8268882@N06/8071388651/). So join us! And better yet, speak! Speaking is also a great way to further your career. This could be the first step to become a world-renown speaker! And speaking gives you so much more in terms of network, job opportunities and know-how. Almost nothing is as transformative for your career as public speaking. So start now! Submit a small talk to [masked] See you then! Freddy Guime

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  • Jamming with a Quantum Computer: A musical journey into quantum computing

    Musical improvisation is the creative activity of composing music "in the moment" while performing it, often in a jam session with other musicians. Although composing and performing music is a creative process, the underlying musical style informs the probabilities of note and rhythmic choices that the musician makes. For example, when improvising in the style of twelve-bar blues, the notes played with the highest frequency of occurrence are typically the five that comprise the corresponding minor pentatonic scale. This idea of musical style being a complex system of probabilities fits perfectly with the probabilistic nature of quantum mechanics, which is a phenomenon leveraged by quantum computing. To implement this idea, James Weaver created an open source application named Quantum Music Composer that makes use of a quantum computer to improvise music in a very simplified version of 17th century counterpoint. In this session, James will give an introduction to quantum computing, cover a bit of music theory, and demonstrate how a quantum computer can compose music and participate in a musical jam session. He will then discuss the development and implementation of the Quantum Music Composer application on IBM quantum computers. SPEAKER BIO James Weaver is a developer, author, and speaker with a passion for quantum computing. He is a Java Champion, and a JavaOne Rockstar. James has written books including Inside Java, Beginning J2EE, the Pro JavaFX series, and Java with Raspberry Pi. As an IBM Quantum Developer Advocate, James speaks internationally at quantum and classical computing conferences. He tweets as @JavaFXpert, and blogs at http://JavaFXpert.com and http://CulturedEar.com

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  • Performance Tuning using jPDM

    Smartsheet City Center

    jPDM is the basis of a performance tuning methodology that is designed to guide you to a biased free diagnosis of performance regressions in Java application. But rather than just talk about it, we'll use it by tuning an application together using jPDM. SPEAKER: Kirk Pepperdine Kirk has been performance tuning Java applications for about 20 years. Frequent speaker at JUGs and conferences worldwide and has been named a JavaONE rockstar numerous times. Kirk authored the original Java performance tuning workshop and jPDM, a performance diagnostic model. This model is the core of the diagnostic engine developed by JClarity, a startup cofounded by Kirk. In 2006 Kirk was named as a Java Champion. More recently he has named as part of the Oracle groundbreakers and InfoQ influencers. Kirk continues to be an ardent support of the Java community cofounding JCrete, a Java unconference and by helping other establish Java (un)conferences worldwide. Thanks to our Sponsor, Smartsheet for hosting!

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  • Reactive Spring

    Expedia

    Microservices and big-data increasingly confront us with the limitations of traditional input/output. In traditional IO, work that is IO-bound dominates threads. This wouldn't be such a big deal if we could add more threads cheaply, but threads are expensive on the JVM, and most other platforms. Even if threads were cheap and infinitely scalable, we'd still be confronted with the faulty nature of networks. Things break, and they often do so in subtle, but non-exceptional ways. Traditional approaches to integration bury the faulty nature of networks behind overly simplifying abstractions. We need something better. Spring Framework 5 is here ! It introduces the Spring developer to a growing world of support for reactive programming across the Spring portfolio, starting with a new Netty-based web runtime, component model and module called Spring WebFlux, and then continuing to Spring Data Kay, Spring Security 5.0, Spring Boot 2.0 and Spring Cloud Finchley. Sure, it sounds like a lot, but don't worry! Join me, your guide, Spring developer advocate Josh Long, and we'll explore the wacky, wonderful world of Reactive Spring together. SPEAKER: Josh Long Josh (@starbuxman) is the Spring Developer Advocate at Pivotal. Josh is a Java Champion, author of 6 books (including O'Reilly's Cloud Native Java: Designing Resilient Systems with Spring Boot, Spring Cloud, and Cloud Foundry and the upcoming Reactive Spring) and numerous best-selling video trainings (including Building Microservices with Spring Boot Livelessons with Spring Boot co-founder Phil Webb), and an open-source contributor (Spring Boot, Spring Integration, Spring Cloud, Activiti and Vaadin).

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  • The Future of Java SE

    Code Fellows

    With the new late binding of features to a release, we no longer have a Java road-map that calls out what features will come out in the next releases. We do have many interesting projects in OpenJDK that Oracle and others in the community are working on “for some future release”. Come get a high-level overview of the most-interesting and most-innovative projects that might deliver features to a version in the near future. We will also discuss how some new practices try to balance the need for evolving the platform with trying to keep older code running on newer versions. Aurelio García-Ribeyro is a Director of Product Management for the Java Platform Group at Oracle He has been involved in the development of the JDK since JDK 7. He is a frequent presenter at JavaOne, Oracle Code One, and with Java User Groups and Oracle Customers. Aurelio's role includes making sure that groups within Oracle that use the JDK are well informed of changes as well as explaining the most relevant features and enhancements in upcoming releases. He has received a JavaOne Rock Star Award. Aurelio joined Oracle in 2010 through the Sun Microsystems acquisition. He joined Sun in 2008. Before moving to California he worked in Workforce Management and Telecommunications in Florida. Aurelio holds a BS in Systems Engineering from Universidad de Lima, and an MBA from MIT Sloan.

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