What we're about

At the San Francisco JUG you get to meet other local Java professionals and talk about code, architecture, innovation, opportunities, and share ideas about real-world problems. Can't make it in person? Join the Zoom and ask questions in the chat! https://pivotal.zoom.us/j/2699571656

Recordings are posted on our YouTube channel! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hybrgeBvDyQ

Our meetings are technically focused and often include expert speakers on Java-related topics.

We welcome both beginners and gurus, both developers and managers, both geeks and professionals.

We typically meet on Wednesdays from 6-8pm of each month and our meetings are FREE and OPEN to the public.

If you are an employer, a recruiter, or simply someone looking for Java employment opportunities, check out Discussions -> Message Board -> Job Listings (http://www.sfjava.org/messages/boards/forum/1298941) (you can track this forum to get email notifications)

Follow us at @sfjug!

Your hosts,

@pieterhumphrey & @direherring

Upcoming events (3)

Performance tuning Twitter services with Graal and Machine Learning

6:00pm - food, beverage and networking 6:30pm - presentation to start at 6:30pm PT. 8:00pm - end Can't make it in person? Join the zoom at 6:30PT! Audio doesn't start until we do, so don't worry if you don't hear anything at first. https://pivotal.zoom.us/j/2699571656 Running Twitter services on Graal has been very successful and saved Twitter a lot of money on datacenter cost. But we would like to run more efficient to reduce cost even more. I mean, who doesn’t? In order to do this we are using our Machine Learning framework called Autotune to tune Graal inlining parameters. This talk will show how much performance improvement we got by autotuning Graal. This builds on top of my previous talk “Twitter’s quest for a wholly Graal runtime” and explores how we can use Machine Learning to further improve performance and as a result save on datacenter cost. Chris Thalinger Staff Software Engineer at Twitter Chris Thalinger is a software engineer working on Java Virtual Machines for over 14 years. His main expertise is in compiler technology with Just-In-Time compilation in particular. Initially being involved with the CACAO and GNU Classpath projects, the focus shifted to OpenJDK as soon as Sun made the JDK open-source. Ever since Chris has worked on the HotSpot JVM at Sun, Oracle and now at Twitter.

Building a Front end Pipeline

Pivotal Labs

6:00pm - food, beverage and networking 6:30pm - presentation to start at 6:30pm PT. 8:00pm - end Can't make it in person? Join the zoom at 6:30PT! Audio doesn't start until we do, so don't worry if you don't hear anything at first. https://pivotal.zoom.us/j/2699571656 Building a Front end Pipeline Back in the day, it used to be so simple. Our projects had a main.js file that contained a few hundred lines and every so often the corporate communication department would ship out some new CSS files. But now things are not quite so easy. With more and more single page apps containing thousands or hundreds of thousands of lines of JavaScript, we’re going to need a bigger boat. In this talk I will explore various options you can deploy on your projects to tame the mass of code that lives on the front end of our applications. From NPM to Gulp to Webpack, this talk will help you establish a front end pipeline. Speaker: Nate Schutta Nathaniel T. Schutta is a software architect focused on cloud computing and building usable applications. A proponent of polyglot programming, Nate has written multiple books and appeared in various videos. Nate is a seasoned speaker regularly presenting at conferences worldwide, No Fluff Just Stuff symposia, meetups, universities, and user groups. In addition to his day job, Nate is an adjunct professor at the University of Minnesota where he teaches students to embrace dynamic languages. Driven to rid the world of bad presentations, Nate coauthored the book Presentation Patterns with Neal Ford and Matthew McCullough. Nate recently published Thinking Architecturally available as a free download from Pivotal.

Fifty Shades of Correctness: World beyond TDD

Pivotal Labs

6:00pm - food, beverage and networking 6:30pm - presentation to start at 6:30pm PT. 8:00pm - end Can't make it in person? Join the zoom at 6:30PT! Audio doesn't start until we do, so don't worry if you don't hear anything at first. https://pivotal.zoom.us/j/2699571656 Last decade of programming languages advancement brought about a healthy synthesis of old and new paradigms. The progress is accompanied by renewed interest in the foundations of computation theory. Heroic attempts are being made to develop explanations more accessible to wider audience. Consequently we as engineers have a broad toolset and knowledge base at our disposal to write correct programs. This talk will explore the notion of Correctness not only as formally defined in CS fundamentals, but also numerous intuitions and associations that software engineering community holds with respect to this concept. Engineers will learn to reason about how design decisions can lead to programs with high level of correctness. We will discuss tools and practical techniques to apply on top of TDD to achieve even higher confidence in the system under test. Example tools and patterns covered: Mutation Testing Property Based Testing Tests and Types equivalence Static vs Dynamic Typing Type Driven Development Speaker: Julian Warszawski is a Vice President Engineer at Goldman Sachs Consumer Finance division. Over his 15 years of professional experience he assumed roles of dev, engineer in test, devops, architect, PM, leader and consultant. He has been involved in multitude of domains, like IoT, Security, Trading, GIS or Virtualization. Financial Technology has a special place among those domains. Fintech projects are bright examples of how complexity affects practical ability to guarantee system correctness. This phenomenon has been Julian's primary interest and was covered in his recent tech talks. See "Models vs Reality: Quest for the Roots of Complexity". Julian has been an active contributor to engineering community as a member and organizer of Java User Group in his home town of Lodz (Poland). He was a part of Bay Area Domain Driven Design group and also shared his insights speaking at conferences like Devoxx, Geecon or InfoTech. The upcoming tech talk will further explore the complexity vs correctness problem and provide valuable mental models to help us improve as engineers.

Past events (146)

The GraalVM Universal Runtime

Pivotal Labs

Photos (926)