More Data than Facebook: Discovering New Particles at the Large Hadron Collider

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Alex Titterton will be giving a talk about muons, his PhD, and the Large Hadron Collider. Guaranteed to be packed with puns.

This event is sponsored by the Jean Golding Institute, and will take place in the Reception Room in the Wills Memorial building.

## Abstract
Since 2008 experiments at CERN's Large Hadron Collider, situated 100 metres beneath the Franco-Swiss border near Geneva, have generated enormous amounts of data from over 10 million billion proton collisions. In this talk I will give an insight into the immense work undertaken behind the scenes at such an experiment in order to measure particle collisions with incredibly high precision, including the handling of over 40 Terabytes of data per second. I also address many of the common misconceptions held about life in a large particle physics collaboration, as well as including tales about Russian tank shells, diplomatic immunity and almost being on Blue Peter

## About Alex
Alex Titterton was born in 1993 in the gorgeous town of Walsall in the West Midlands, spending his entire childhood in a nearby village where not an awful lot happens. Growing up he became interested primarily in mathematics, computers, coffee and old Italian cars, and moved south in order to undertake a masters degree in mathematics and physics at the University of Bristol. In 2015 he started a PhD in particle physics, jointly appointed between the University of Bristol, University of Southampton and the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, and as part of this in 2017 moved to France to work at CERN. For 18 months he had a terrible time, spending the weekdays searching for Supersymmetry and the weekends skiing and driving an old Alfa Romeo around scenic mountain roads. Two blown-up Alfas and a thesis later, he is finally finishing his PhD in Bristol before moving to the ever-greener pastures of work in industry.

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Refreshments will be provided, sponsored by uncommoncorrelation.co.uk