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Isiris
isirisc
New York, NY
Post #: 50
Hi ladies,
The brunch was great! When I got home and showed my husband my gifts, he reminded about how toxic aluminum is (the main ingredient in Alum). That is one reason we don't use aluminum pots for cooking or use regular deoderant, which has aluminum in it. It is absorbed through the skin. They have found that people with Alzheimer's who were autopsied had above normal levels of aluminum in their brain. Here's a excerpt from a page I found on http://www.ochef.com/...­

Alum is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as a food additive, but in large quantities ? well, an ounce or more ? it is toxic to humans. As a result, efforts have been made and are being made to wean us of our alum dependency. The U.S. Department of Agriculture says that if good quality produce and modern canning methods are employed, there is no need to use alum to bolster the crispness of our pickles and cherries. In any event, the department says, even if alum is used to soak the pickles, it should not be used in the final pickling liquid.

As much as I would like expand my knowledge of dying (which so far is only limited to Kool-Aide and food dye) and I graciously thank Dawn for the gift, I'm not going to use the Alum, but if anybody wants it, let me know and I'll bring it to the next meeting. Isn't there other mordants we could use that would be as effective and healthier? I know that vinegar works with food coloring and Kool-Aide. I don't even want to use the chemical dyes. I'm gonna look into natural dyes.

Here are a few sites to look at:
http://www.atsdr.cdc....­
http://www.mercola.co...­
http://www.mercola.co...­
http://www.alternativ...­
Dawn
user 4159308
New York, NY
Post #: 6
Alum is used in natural dyeing. About 2 tablespoons is what I used to mordant 8 ounces of wool to dye with cochineal. I think that 2 tablespoons is a proportionally small amount, but I'd be interested in learning more.
Jillan
user 4608068
Brooklyn, NY
Post #: 8
I'm still unable to find Alum locally. Dawn, would you mind getting some for me, please? I will be at the next meetup. Thanks and let me know how much.

Jillan
Isiris
isirisc
New York, NY
Post #: 51
I'm still unable to find Alum locally. Dawn, would you mind getting some for me, please? I will be at the next meetup. Thanks and let me know how much.

Jillan
Jacquard dyes use vinegar to set the color. I feel a little safer with that (That is, when I start dying with dye!) http://www.jacquardpr...­. Here's another site: http://www.dharmatrad...­
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