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Re: [newurbanism-101] New Meetup: San Diego Backyard Fruit meetup

From: Tracy D.
Sent on: Tuesday, January 20, 2009 4:13 PM
I have one better...how about planting fruit trees on public property....I'll bet there are places we can do it. Some friends and I are starting Freedom Gardens here in San Diego county, where we will teach the urban poor how to grow their own food, and we have some ideas for who we can get to donate supplies....maybe even some land! Our first meeting will be next Wed. Eve...anyone interested?

On Tue, Jan 20, 2009 at 2:53 PM, Michelle <[address removed]> wrote:
This is great -- Does anyone know if anyone is working on something similar in San Diego?


--- On Sun, 1/18/09, Kate & Tom <[address removed]> wrote:

> From: Kate & Tom <[address removed]>
> Subject: Re: [newurbanism-101] New Meetup: San Diego Backyard Fruit meetup
> To: [address removed]
> Date: Sunday, January 18, 2009, 12:08 PM
> One more - fyi:
>
> http://www.fallenfruit.org/whatisfallenfruit.html
>
> *Fallen Fruit: Public Fruit Jam this Sunday *
> August 1st, 2008 by Kristin A. Smith
>
> What do you get when you mix L.A. sunshine, a collection of
> artists and an
> obscure state law? The Fallen Fruit project.
>
> A few years ago, artist/activist and CalArts professor
> Matias Viegener
> stumbled across a California law stating that any fruit
> that grows on or
> over public land is community property, even if the trunk
> is rooted in a
> private yard. In LA, that means both bounty and variety of
> fruit.
>
> Viegener joined forces with CalArts colleagues and
> collaborators David Burns
> and Austin Young, and the trio set out to find trees that
> spread their
> branches over sidewalks, streets and parking lots. They
> looked for hidden
> fig trees in city parks and gnarled grape vines on fences.
> They found plum
> trees in abandoned lots and olive trees by highways.
>
> Armed with sharpies and recycled paper, they set out to map
> the public fruit
> of their city and thus the Fallen Fruit project was born.
> The group set
> about trying to feed those most in need by distributing the
> maps to
> residents and posting them around the neighborhood. A
> passage from Leviticus
> 19 was their guide: When you reap the harvest of your land,
> you shall not
> reap all the way to the edges of your field, or gather the
> gleanings of your
> harvest. You shall not pick your vineyard bare, or gather
> the fallen fruit
> of your vineyard; you shall leave them for the poor and the
> stranger.
>
> Their website offers a series of LA-based fruit maps and
> suggestions on
> creating one for your own neighborhood. The eventual goal
> is to produce a
> global atlas of public fruit maps.
>
> But the group doesn't rely just on the city's
> existing fruit for the
> project. As a part of their mission, Fallen Fruit
> encourages homeowners to
> plant fruit trees on the perimeter of their property and
> advocates for the
> city to plant more fruit trees in public spaces.
>
> Fallen Fruit also organizes community events to let their
> neighbors get a
> taste of the wild urban bounty. In the early days, they
> rallied friends for
> midnight fruit forages through the concrete jungle, and
> they now host
> daytime events, as well, such as the Public Fruit Jam,
> which will be held
> for the third consecutive year this Sunday, August 3rd.
>
> The Public Fruit Jam invites LA residents to come together
> and make jam with
> fruit harvested and collected from their own yards.
>
> The kinds of jam we make will improvise on the fruit that
> the participants
> provide. The fruit can be fresh or frozen. Fallen Fruit
> will bring public
> fruit. We are looking for radical and experimental jams as
> well, like basil
> guava or lemon pepper jelly. We'll discuss the basics
> of jam and jelly
> making, pectin and bindings, the aesthetics of sweetness,
> as well as the
> communal power of shared food and the liberation of public
> fruit.
>
> If you are in LA or would like to make a trip there this
> weekend, you'll
> find Fallen Fruit jammers at The Machine Project in Echo
> Park, 1200 Alvarado
> Street, from noon to 3pm. And just one month from now, be
> sure to get
> another jam fix at Slow Food Nation's Honey and
> Preserves Pavilion.
>
> Kristin A. Smith is a freelance writer and educator in San
> Francisco. It was
> at the Seattle farmer's market, where she worked for
> years, that she
> cultivated her love of organic food.
>
>
> Kate McDevitt
>
> Assistant Director, United Through Reading -
> www.unitedthroughreading.org
>
> Slow Food Urban San Diego
>
>
>
>
> On Sun, Jan 18, 2009 at 12:03 PM, Kate & Tom
> <[address removed]> wrote:
>
> >  FYI-
> >
> >  Article:Oakland's fruit doesn't fall far from
> the
> > tree:/c/a/2008/08/29/HO1J124S37.DTL
> > Article:Oakland's fruit doesn't fall far from
> the
> > tree:/c/a/2008/08/29/HO1J124S37.DTL
> >
> >
> <http://us.ard.yahoo.com/SIG=158imhrsn/M=600016730.600020501.400149188.400149188/D=ncon/S=2022776206:LREC/Y=PARTNER_US/EXP=1232316114/L=da8f5c0c-e59a-11dd-a255-3f777572b212/B=GQktAGKID0g-/J=1232308914561088/A=1718627676380974414/R=0/X=2/SIG=11qnmgg4e/*http://www.cel.sfsu.edu/sp09infosessions/index.cfm?fm=67>
> >  [image: SFGate] <http://www.sfgate.com/> Back
> to
> Article<http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2008/08/30/HO1J124S37.DTL>
> > [image: SFGate]
> > Oakland's fruit doesn't fall far from the tree
> >
> > Matthew E. Green, Special to The Chronicle
> >
> > Saturday, August 30, 2008
> >  [image: Anne Louise Burdett, Director of Urban Youth
> Harvest,
> lea...]<http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/object/article?f=/c/a/2008/08/30/HO1J124S37.DTL&o=0&type=printable>
> [image:
> > Juan Carlos Morales climbs up a large tree in Oakland
> to
> ...]<http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/object/article?f=/c/a/2008/08/30/HO1J124S37.DTL&o=1&type=printable>
> [image:
> > Max Feld hands over a full bag of pears to
> PUEBLO's
> Morales.]<http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/object/article?f=/c/a/2008/08/30/HO1J124S37.DTL&o=2&type=printable>
> [image:
> > Six-year-olds Luis Lopez (left) and Brian Altheimer
> from
> ...]<http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/object/article?f=/c/a/2008/08/30/HO1J124S37.DTL&o=3&type=printable>
> >
> More...<http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/object/article?f=/c/a/2008/08/30/HO1J124S37.DTL&o=4&type=printable>
> >
> > In the backyard of a house in Oakland's Rockridge
> neighborhood, seven high
> > school kids balance themselves carefully in the boughs
> of a robust apple
> > tree, throwing down ripe fruit to a small ground
> squad.
> >
> > Once the tree is stripped, the crew weighs the bags
> and announces the haul:
> > 63 pounds. It's the third and final yard visit of
> the day, and the group has
> > already gathered more than 150 pounds of ripe apples,
> oranges and lemons.
> >
> > In this part of Urban Youth Harvest, a program of the
> nonprofit People
> > United for a Better Life in Oakland (PUEBLO),
> teenagers and young adults
> > from neighborhoods in East and West Oakland are hired
> for the summer to
> > glean fruit from backyard trees, largely in the
> Dimond, Laurel and Fruitvale
> > neighborhoods, if residents don't have the
> inclination to do so themselves.
> >
> > The harvest is donated to low-income senior centers in
> the neighborhoods in
> > which the youths live. It also goes to local youth and
> community programs,
> > which sell it at below supermarket cost to residents
> who often lack access
> > to fresh produce.
> >
> > In July alone, more than 600 pounds of fruit was
> gleaned from Oakland yards.
> > Harvests have included grapefruit, limes, apricots,
> plums, peaches, figs,
> > walnuts, pomegranates and blackberries. Perhaps most
> striking is that most
> > of the fruit grows year after year with little or no
> human assistance - and
> > about 99 percent of it is never treated with
> pesticides.
> >
> > This year the program hired four youths to pick
> throughout the summer. On
> > the July day that a reporter tagged along, the crew
> included members of the
> > West Oakland urban agriculture nonprofit People's
> Grocery, who help out
> > every few weeks.
> >
> > "As long as I don't have to touch spiders,
> I'm cool," says Jennifer Copto,
> > 15, who lives in East Oakland. "I didn't
> really know that people were
> > growing fruits in Oakland. There are all kinds."
> > Practice increases
> >
> > Gleaning, the age-old practice of collecting harvest
> leftovers, has been
> > adopted by a number of food banks in California and
> other states feeling the
> > pinch of decreasing donations and growing numbers of
> hungry people. The
> > Alameda County Community Food Bank provides roughly
> 250,000 pounds of food
> > to its 300-member agencies throughout the county. It
> feeds 40,000 people a
> > week and estimates that food requests are up at least
> 30 percent from last
> > year.
> >
> > Over the past two years, the food bank has started
> accepting more donations
> > of fresh local produce, and this year it will
> distribute roughly seven times
> > the amount it did in 2005, according to its executive
> director, Suzan
> > Bateson.
> >
> > Anne Burdett, 24, who coordinates the harvesting
> program, has spent the
> > summer guiding her crew throughout Oakland while
> fielding calls from
> > homeowners with more fruit than they know what to do
> with.
> >
> > This year, the operation joined Cycles of Change, a
> local youth bicycle
> > program, and the young harvesters frequently made
> their rounds on two wheels
> > with attached cargo wagons.
> >
> > "I had no idea how much fruit there was and how
> much you can get done with
> > just four or eight kids," Burdett said. "My
> perspective on food has changed.
> > I didn't realize that one tree could yield 200
> pounds of fruit. It gives me
> > a new sense of 'local.' "
> >
> > Burdett says the biggest challenge can be locating
> donors, which is mostly
> > done through neighborhood flyers, community events and
> word of mouth. She
> > hopes there will be enough demand and funding to
> continue the project
> > throughout the year as an after-school job
> opportunity.
> >
> > In collaboration with other Oakland nonprofits,
> Burdett's small team is
> > surveying residents throughout the city on issues
> related to healthy food
> > access while also working to create a database of
> houses that have fruit
> > trees.
> >
> > The grant-funded project also has plans to collaborate
> with UC Berkeley
> > students to map out where available produce is located
> and how much surplus
> > is available each year. A similar undertaking was
> recently completed in Los
> > Angeles by a group of artists; their maps to publicly
> accessible fruit trees
> > in the city are available at FallenFruit.org.
> > From nuisance to nutrition
> >
> > The map project, which started last year, is the
> brainchild of PUEBLO
> > Executive Director Rashidah Grinage. Every summer her
> tree-filled backyard
> > in East Oakland was producing and dropping far more
> fruit than she could
> > handle, even after she made countless pies, jams and
> chutneys.
> >
> > "It's a great service," says Burdett,
> sampling a just-picked apple. "When
> > you've got hundreds of pounds of fruit falling, it
> makes a big mess. People
> > call us desperate. ... Residents can't possibly
> use a lot of it."
> >
> > Fallen fruit quickly rots, can produce foul smells and
> attracts insect and
> > animal pests. Some cities have ordinances identifying
> neglected fruit trees
> > that reach over fences onto the street as a public
> nuisance.
> >
> > Grey Kolevzon, co-director of Cycles of Change, was
> pleasantly surprised by
> > the bounty of the project's summer harvest.
> >
> > "I'm floored," Kolevzon says. "It
> makes you think on a citywide scale. ...
> > What can be done in the long-term future to satisfy
> the needs of Oakland
> > (residents)?"
> >
> > One of the People's Grocery harvesters, a
> 17-year-old Oakland resident who
> > goes by the name Virtuous, says this summer's
> fruit-picking experience has
> > altered his edible outlook.
> >
> > "That's what I'm going to tell my kids
> one day," he says, motioning to the
> > bag of apples. "'You hungry? Go pick a piece
> of fruit from the tree.'"
> >
> >  To see a video of Urban Youth Harvest in action, go
> to *
> > sfgate.com/homeandgarden.*
> >
> > **
> > Local harvests
> >
> > The success of a harvesting collective on the
> Peninsula is a good sign for
> > Urban Youth Harvest. Founded in 2001 by a Silicon
> Valley businesswoman,
> > Village Harvest has more than 200 volunteers who pick
> 80,000 pounds of fruit
> > each year from the backyards of residents, many of
> them elderly, in Santa
> > Clara and San Mateo counties. Most is donated to soup
> kitchens.
> >
> > Another local endeavor, called Forage Oakland: Forage
> San Francisco, is a
> > blog-based bartering project in which residents
> exchange backyard produce,
> > posting what's available on the Web.
> >
> > *- M.G. *
> >
> > **
> >
> > E-mail Matthew E. Green at [address removed].
> >
> >
> http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2008/08/30/HO1J124S37.DTL
> >
> > This article appeared on page *F - 1* of the San
> Francisco Chronicle
> >    San Francisco Chronicle Sections
> >  (c) 2008 Hearst Communications
> Inc.<http://www.sfgate.com/chronicle/info/copyright/>|
> Privacy
> > Policy <http://www.sfgate.com/pages/privacy/> |
> Feedback<http://www.sfgate.com/feedback/>| RSS
> > Feeds <http://www.sfgate.com/rss/> |
> FAQ<http://www.sfgate.com/chronicle/faq.shtml>| Site
> > Index <http://www.sfgate.com/index/> |
> Contact<http://www.sfgate.com/staff/>
> >   [image: Quantcast]
> <http://www.quantcast.com/p-18RwvsI7rqyEk>
> >
> >
> > Kate McDevitt
> >
> > Assistant Director, United Through Reading -
> www.unitedthroughreading.org
> >
> > Slow Food Urban San Diego, Membership & Outreach
> Chair
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > On Sun, Jan 18, 2009 at 11:57 AM, Jenean
> <[address removed]> wrote:
> >
> >> Announcing a new Meetup for The San Diego
> Sustainable Development Meetup
> >> Group!
> >>
> >> What: San Diego Backyard Fruit meetup
> >>
> >> When: January 24,[masked]:00 AM
> >>
> >> Where: Click the link below to find out!
> >>
> >> Meetup Description: Hi Everyone,
> >>
> >> A member of our group, Bill, has started the
> "San Diego Backyard Fruit
> >> Meetup" The first meeting is on Jan 24th at
> 10am in Old Town.
> >>
> >> Discuss fruit tree cultivation in San Diego
> county.
> >>
> >> Suggested topics: fertilizers, selecting
> varieties, soil types, organic
> >> growing, watering systems, exotics, harvesting,
> grafting, pollination,
> >> managing pests, and whatever else group members
> would like to discuss.
> >>
> >> All invited for casual social gathering. Discuss
> plans for outings, any
> >> special topics of interest, and just network with
> fellow fruit growers.
> >>
> >> Please check out Bill's site for more info.
> and to sign up for this group.
> >> http://www.meetup.com/San-Diego-Backyard-Fruit.
> >>
> >> Learn more here:
> >>
> http://newurbanism.meetup.com/101/calendar/9550310/
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> --
> >> Please Note: If you hit "*REPLY*", your
> message will be sent to *everyone
> >> * on this mailing list
> ([address removed])
> >> This message was sent by Jenean
> ([address removed]) from The San
> >> Diego Sustainable Development Meetup
> Group<http://newurbanism.meetup.com/101/>
> >> .
> >> To learn more about Jenean, visit his/her member
> profile<http://newurbanism.meetup.com/101/members/3551523/>
> >> To unsubscribe or to update your mailing list
> settings, click
> here<http://www.meetup.com/account/comm/>
> >>
> >>  Meetup Support: [address removed]
> >> 632 Broadway, New York, NY 10012 USA
> >>
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > --
> > Please Note: If you hit "*REPLY*", your
> message will be sent to *everyone*on this mailing list (
> > [address removed])
> > This message was sent by Kate & Tom
> ([address removed]) from The San
> > Diego Sustainable Development Meetup
> Group<http://newurbanism.meetup.com/101/>
> > .
> > To learn more about Kate & Tom, visit his/her
> member
> profile<http://newurbanism.meetup.com/101/members/5446511/>
> > To unsubscribe or to update your mailing list
> settings, click
> here<http://www.meetup.com/account/comm/>
> >
> >  Meetup Support: [address removed]
> > 632 Broadway, New York, NY 10012 USA
> >



--
Please Note: If you hit "REPLY", your message will be sent to everyone on this mailing list ([address removed])
This message was sent by Michelle ([address removed]) from The San Diego Sustainable Development Meetup Group.
To learn more about Michelle, visit his/her member profile: http://newurbanism.meetup.com/101/members/55791/
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Meetup Support: [address removed]
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--
Peace,
Tracy A Darling MD

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